D W Winnicott

In addition, quite a number of expository volumes in the English language in recent years have provided useful summaries of Donald Winnicott's extensive body of writings (e.g. Davis & Wallbridge, 1981; Clancier & Kalmanovitch, 1984; ...

D W  Winnicott

A distillation of painstaking research into the life of Donald Winnicott, tracing his life from his childhood in Plymouth, through his career in paediatrics, to his election as President of the British Psycho-Analytic Society. The author makes many interesting links between Winnicott's life and the development of his theories.

D W Winnicott

Social Work Winnicott's war - time experience as consultant psychiatrist to the government evacuation scheme in Oxfordshire was , according to the editors of Deprivation and Delinquency ( Winnicott , 1984 ) , a ' watershed [ for ] ...

D W Winnicott

`The importance of Michael Jacobs′ book lies in his attempt to convey... Winnicott′s profound influence.... Jacobs rightly delights in the creativity and imagination of his subject and illustrates these with numerous quotations and descriptions from Winnicott′s writings.... What is conveyed throughout the book is the essence of Winnicott.... [whose] gift was to make psychoanalytic language, methods and concepts more widely available, accepted and appreciated to a nonpsychoanalytic world′ - British Psychological Society Counselling Psychology Review One of the best-known British psychoanalysts, D W Winnicott attracts the interest of counsellors and psychotherapists far beyond the strict psychoanalytic tradition in which he was trained. He coined many phrases that have entered the discourse of therapy, such as `good enough mother′, `transitional object′ and `facilitating environment′. Winnicott has had a profound impact on research into the mother-baby relationship, and his unorthodox manner and sparkling writing style have attracted enthusiastic acclaim. In this book, Michael Jacobs summarizes Winnicott′s life and explains his major theoretical concepts. He also rigorously evaluates his practice as a clinician - for example, the holding and management of deeply regressed patients. While highlighting Winnicott′s brilliance and creativity, Jacobs is not afraid to scrutinize his contributions more critically. He also discusses criticisms others have made of Winnicott, notably within the psychoanalytic movement. The final chapter assesses the influence of Winnicott′s thinking in other countries as well as in Britain.

The Collected Works of D W Winnicott

Donald Woods Winnicott Lesley Caldwell, Robert Adès, Helen Taylor Robinson, Amal Treacher Kabesh. among the Swedish, American, French and Italian 'Winnicotts'.) The Collected Works has addressed this by presenting an international team ...

The Collected Works of D W  Winnicott


Donald Winnicott Today

Clancier, A. and Kalmanovitch, J. (1987) Winnicott and Paradox (tr. Sheridan, A.) London: Tavistock. Davis, M. and Wallbridge, D. (1981) Boundary and Space: An Introduction to the Work of D.W. Winnicott New York: Brunner Mazel.

Donald Winnicott Today

What in Winnicott’s theoretical matrix was truly revolutionary for psychoanalysis? In this book, the editor and contributors provide a rare in-depth analysis of his original work, and highlight the specifics of his contribution to the concept of early psychic development which revolutionised the theory and practice of psychoanalysis. Including re-publications of selected Winnicott papers to set the scene for the themes and explorations in subsequent chapters, the book examines how Winnicott expanded Freud’s work, and how his discourse with Melanie Klein sharpened his thought and clinical innovations. Divided into 3 sections, it covers: Introductory overviews on the evolution of Winnicott’s theoretical matrix Personal perspectives from eminent psychoanalysts on how Winnicott’s originality inspired their own work Further recent examinations and extensions including new findings from the archives Drawing on her own extensive knowledge of Winnicott and the expertise of the distinguished contributors, Jan Abram shows us how Winnicott’s contribution constitutes a major psychoanalytic advance to the concept of subjectivity. As such, it will be an inspiration to experienced psychoanalysts, psychotherapists and all those interested in human nature and emotional development.

Play and Reflection in Donald Winnicott s Writings

Similarly, André Green championed the work of Donald Winnicott long before most continental psychoanalysts had begun to develop an appreciation for the great English psychoanalyst. Though one may not easily detect overt correspondences ...

Play and Reflection in Donald Winnicott s Writings

The third book in the Winnicott Clinic Lecture Series contains a lecture from the author on Winnicott's theory on play. He discusses Winnicott's view on the importance of play and then moves on to presenting his own, somewhat contradictory, view on it. The author provides an innovative and provocative perspective on the subject, inviting people to think independently rather than accepting theories already laid out for them.

The Evolution of Winnicott s Thinking

Winnicott, D. W. (1952). Psychosis in childcare. In: Collected Papers (pp. 219– 228). London: Tavistock. Winnicott, D. W. (1953). Transitional objects and transitional phenomena. In: Playing and Reality (1971). Winnicott, D. W. (1962a).

The Evolution of Winnicott s Thinking

What happens to the thinking of a thinker who refuses a discipleship? This book attempts to answer this question in relation to D. W. Winnicott and the evolution of his thinking. He eschewed a following, privileging the independence of his thinking and fostering the same in others. However Winnicott's thinking exerts a growing influence in areas including psychoanalysis, psychology, and human development. This book looks at the nature of Winnicott's thought and its influence. It first examines the development of Winnicott's thinking through his own life time (first generation) and then continues this exploration by viewing the thinking in members of the group with a strong likelihood of influence from him; his analysands (second generation) and their analysands (third generation).

Winnicott s Theory of the Maturational Processes

Winnicott, D. W. (1984b). The absence of a sense of guilt. In: Deprivation and Delinquency (pp. 106–112). London: Routledge, 1994. Winnicott, D. W. (1984c). Aggression, guilt and reparation. In: Home is Where We Start From (pp. 80–89).

Winnicott s Theory of the Maturational Processes

This book presents the central concepts of Winnicott's theory of the maturational processes, clarifying its premises and providing an organised description of the various stages, with their respective tasks and achievements. This theory, considered by Winnicott as the backbone of his theoretical and clinical work, can be used as a practical guide for the understanding of health phenomena and for the early detection of emotional difficulties. It also provides the framework from which different aspects of the study of human nature can be developed, such as those related to cultural achievements and the entire domain of creativity, as well as the basis on which it is possible to clarify concepts about psychic disorders, on account of their intimate connection with the stages of maturation. Just as Winnicott did, this study will concentrate on the early stages, when the foundation of personality and psychic health is established.

Winnicott s Children

Winnicott, D. W. (1960) 'Ego distortion in terms of True and False Self'. In D. W. Winnicott The Maturational Processes and the Facilitating Environment, London: Hogarth Press [1965]. Winnicott, D. W. (1962) 'The aims of psycho-analytic ...

Winnicott s Children

Winnicott’s Children focuses on the use we make of the thinking and writing of DW Winnicott; how this has enhanced our understanding of children and the settings where we work, and how it has influenced the way in which we do that work. It is a volume by clinicians, concerned about how, as well as why, we engage with particular children in particular ways. The book begins with a scholarly and accessible exposition of the place of Winnicott in his time, in relation to his contemporaries – Melanie Klein, Anna Freud, John Bowlby – and the development of his thinking. The dual focus on the earliest experience of the infant and its consequences plus the ‘how’ of engaging with children – as good-enough mothers or good enough therapists – is picked up in the chapters that follow. The role of play is central to a chapter on supervision; struggling through the doldrums can be part of the adolescent’s experience and that of those who engage with him; the role of psychotherapy in a Winnicottian therapeutic community and an inner city secondary school is explored; and a chapter on radio work links us personally with Winnicott and his desire to talk plainly and helpfully to parents. There is a richness in the collection of subjects in this book, and in the experience of the writers. It will appeal to those who work with children – in child and family mental health settings, schools, hospitals, colleges and social care settings.

Therapeutic Approaches in Work with Traumatised Children and Young People

Winnicott, D.W. (1949) 'Birth memories, birth trauma and anxiety.' In D.W. Winnicott (2002). Winnicott, D.W. (1951) 'Transitional objects and phenomena. ... Winnicott, D.W. (1960a) 'Ego distortion in terms of true and false self.

Therapeutic Approaches in Work with Traumatised Children and Young People

'This book gives extensive coverage to work by staff at the Cotswold Community, a therapeutic community of working with the psychodynamic principle, from 1994 to 2000. It Covers every aspect of the therapeutic way of working in great detail and gives good examples of practice and theory. It also lays out the principles that underpin way of working within a therapeutic environment.' - Children Now 'Trauma for many, is a fact of life. But is the right kind of human environment, so too is recovery.' - Attributed to Paul van Heeswyck from the foreword 'The text draw on the author's experience and wealth of material from staff discussions. The therapeutic framework is applied to this client group and integrated into all aspects of their care. The additional material on child-adult, staff-dynamics, supervision and management, will be of great interest to a wide range of residential staff, social workers, foster carers, therapists and educationalists caring for or working with emotionally needy children and young people.' - Community Care Based on work carried out by staff at the Cotswold Community over a number of years, Therapeutic Approaches in Work with Traumatized Children and Young People provides a clear and comprehensive link between theory and practice. The author shows how practice in residential child care, fostering and other areas of work with children can be developed in a way that is thoughtful and underpinned by a sound theoretical base. Meeting weekly to discuss and review their therapeutic practice in the light of relevant theoretical approaches, the staff at the Cotswold Community produced an invaluable record of working with emotionally traumatized children. The result, brought together here by Patrick Tomlinson, is an in-depth account of a "thinking culture" which provides continual opportunities to respond to children's needs in innovative ways - these include useful suggestions on a range of key issues including education and play, primary provision, sexuality and aggression.

Object Relations in Psychoanalytic Theory

-LESLIE H. FARBER , " On Jealousy " 7 D. W. Winnicott and Harry Guntrip Klein and Fairbairn were system - builders . Each constructed a broad and novel vision of human experience and difficulties : Klein , in her slowly evolving , piece ...

Object Relations in Psychoanalytic Theory

Examines the theories of Freud, Sullivan, Fromm, Jacobson, and other psychologists regarding interpersonal relationships

Twelve Essays on Winnicott

Donald Winnicott and John Bowlby: Personal and professional perspectives. London: Karnac. Lewin, Bertram D. (1949). Sleep, the mouth and the dream screen. Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 15(4), 419–34. Lowenfeld, M. (1979).

Twelve Essays on Winnicott

One of Britain's leading psychoanalysts and pediatricians, Donald Woods Winnicott (1896 - 1971) was the creative mind behind some of the most enduring theories of the child and of child, adolescent and adult analysis. Winnicott's work is still relevant today for child and adult therapists, psychoanalysts, social workers, teachers, and psychologists, and his papers and clinical observations are routinely studied by trainees in psychoanalysis, psychiatry, and clinical psychology. Brought together into a single volume for the first time, the writings that compose Twelve Essays on Winnicott originally appeared as part of the landmark publication The Collected Works of DW Winnicott (winner in the Historical category of the American Board & Academy of Psychoanalysis Book Prize for best books published in 2016). These twelve works of original scholarship provide a distinctive chronological map to Winnicott's theoretical developments and clinical innovations. The result is a substantial contribution to psychoanalytic theory and practice that will be of interest to clinicians, scholars, and new and lifelong students of the work of Donald W. Winnicott.

Thinking Fragments

D. W. Winnicott , The Maturational Processes and the Facilitating Environment ( New York : International Universities Press , 1965 ) . 49. Winnicott , " Anxiety Associated , " in Winnicott , Through Paediatrics , p . 99 . 50.

Thinking Fragments

Looks at how intellectuals have tried to find answers to the crises in Western culture caused by the rejection of objectivity

Winnicott s Babies and Winnicott s Patients

Winnicott, D. W. (1935). The manic defence. In: Through Paediatrics to Psychoanalysis (pp. 129–144). London: Karnac, 1984. Winnicott, D. W. (1941). The observation of infants in a set situation. In: Through Paediatrics to Psychoanalysis ...

Winnicott s Babies and Winnicott s Patients

Winnicott's thinking continues to grow in importance in psychoanalysis today. This book can be described as a clinical primer: by presenting her own personal responses to Winnicott and her initial understanding of his thinking, the author tries to help others develop their own 'Winnicott' to assist with their clinical thinking. This book makes explicit the parallel in Winnicott's thinking between the situation of the baby and the 'nursing couple', and the patient and the 'analytic couple'. There are two helpful baby observation pieces which are aimed at first giving something of the experience of completing a baby observation and then of the reporting of it. In addition to these, there are chapters that treat Winnicott's thinking and the comparison of the original baby with the one who appears in the course of an adult therapy. Winnicott's thinking is first situated historically. Then each of his three stages of dependence are explored in detail: absolute dependence, relative dependence, and going towards independence. These are looked at from the viewpoint of the patient/baby and the mother/therapist in both developmental and clinical situations.

Narcissism and the Self

WINNICOTT, D.W. (1953). Transitional objects and transitional phenomena. International Journal of Psychoanalysis 34:89–97. WINNICOTT, D.W. (1958/1965). Thecapacity to bealone. In: D.W. Winnicott (ed.), The Maturational Processes and ...

Narcissism and the Self

The book examines how coevolved intraspecific aggression and appeasement gestures can give rise to complex social, cultural, and psychopathological phenomena. It argues that the individual's need regulate narcissistic supplies and maintain feelings of safety is the overriding determinant of human conduct and thought in mental health and illness.

After Winnicott

Compilation of Works Based on the Life, Writings and Ideas of D.W. Winnicott Harry Karnac. Psychotherapy, 22:456–458 Kahr, B. (1996c) D.W. Winnicott: A Biographical Portrait London: Karnac Kahr, B. (1999a) Winnicott's Boundaries.

After Winnicott

Harry Karnac began to specialise in psychoanalytic bookselling at the suggestion of Donald Winnicott, a customer at Karnac's bookshop in Gloucester Road during the late 1950s. The two became good friends and Harry's interest in Winnicott and his works has remained strong ever since. This bibliography of over 1200 books, articles and reviews of works by, about, or relating to Winnicott and his work is the result of many years of research, and represents the most complete listing available to date. It is an essential reference work and will be an invaluable aid for scholars, clinicians, analysts, therapists, researchers and anyone interested in the life and work of one of the leading figures in the fields of paediatrics and psychoanalysis.

Madness or Knowing the Unbearable Truth

Edited by: Winnicott, C., Shepherd, R., & Davis, M. London: Karnac, 1989. Winnicott, D. W. (1960a). Ego distortion in terms of true and false self. In: D. W. Winnicott, The Maturational Process and the Facilitating Environment.

Madness or Knowing the Unbearable Truth

The Impossible Choice offers readers a narrative of the relationship between a therapist and her patient who desperately wants to discover her past. With no memory and no way of knowing what was real, her long therapeutic journey was to last 26 years, half her lifetime. Her only reality was the life she lived in the presence of her therapist. The narrative unfolds to reveal a story of horrific events that must be hidden, yet can no longer be kept secret. It sheds light on how chronic long-term traumatisation within a closed family circle can create madness in a vulnerable and lonely child, and helps reader gain an understanding of the enigmatic phenomena of Dissociated Identity Disorder. Having been terrorized into silence, destroying her ability to use language in a house of secrets and lies, the therapy reveals how this patient struggles to come out of her autistic-like state in search of ways to find her past, her ‘self’ and her voice. In this struggle, the reader becomes an audience exposed to the birth of dissociative personae who come forth to tell her story. As language slowly unfolds, she begins to share a first-hand account, albeit in written form, of the most complex psychological forces involved in a victim of incest who simultaneously loves, hates and is terrorized by her lover-father. Through live vignettes it demonstrates how external violence can create inner violence that threatens to annihilate the soul, leaving only a body to survive. The book provides an original contribution to our understanding of the complex psychological forces involved in incest, featuring the patient’s own, coherent written texts, mediated by her therapist. The former’s remarkable insights represent essential reading for all readers involved in policy development for the protection of children at high risk of suffering abuse.

Transcending Taboos

Winnicott, D. W. (1971b). Transitional objects and transitional phenomena. In D.W. Winnicott, Playing and reality (pp. 1–25). New York: Basic Books. (Original work published 1951.) Winnicott, D.W. (1971c).

Transcending Taboos

Cyberspace is composed of a multitude of different spaces where users can represent themselves in many divergent ways. Why in a video game, is it more acceptable to murder or maim than rape? After all, in each case, it is only pixels that are being assaulted. This book avoids wrestling with the common question of whether the virtual violation of real-world taboos is right or wrong, and instead provides a theoretical framework that helps us understand why such distinctions are typically made, and explores the psychological impact of violating offline taboos within cyberspace. The authors discuss such online areas as: ‘Reality’ sites depicting taboo images Social networking websites and online chatrooms Online dating websites Video game content. This book considers whether there are some interactions that should not be permissible even virtually. It also examines how we might be able to cope with the potential moral freedoms afforded by cyberspace, and who might be vulnerable to such freedoms of action and representation within this virtual space. This book is ideal for researchers and students of internet psychology, philosophy and social policy, as well as therapists, those interested in computer science, law, media and communication studies

Experience on the Edge Theorizing Liminality

Winnicott, D. W. (1968a). Clinical illustrations of 'the use of an object'. In L. Caldwell & H. Taylor Robinson (Eds.), The collected work of D. W. Winnicott: Vol. 8 1967–1968. (Original 1968 (pp. 365–368). Oxford University Press.

Experience on the Edge  Theorizing Liminality

Liminality has become a key concept within the social sciences, with a growing number of publications devoted to it in recent years. The concept is needed to address those aspects of human experience and social life that fall outside of ordered structures. In contrast to the clearly defined roles and routines that define so much of industrial work and economic life, it highlights spaces of transition, indefiniteness, ambiguity, play and creativity. Thus, it is an indispensable concept and a necessary counterweight to the overemphasis on structural influences on human behavior. This book aims to use the concept of liminality to develop a culturally and experientially sensitive psychology. This is accomplished by first setting out an original theoretical framework focused on understanding the ‘liminal sources of cultural experience,’ and second an application of concept to a number of different domains, such as tourism, pilgrimage, aesthetics, children’s play, art therapy, and medical diagnosis. Finally, all these domains are then brought together in a concluding commentary chapter that puts them in relation to an overarching theoretical framework. This book will be useful for graduate students and researchers in cultural psychology, critical psychology, psychosocial psychology, developmental psychology, health psychology, anthropology and the social sciences, cultural studies among others.

Rescuing Psychoanalysis from Freud and Other Essays in Re Vision

Winnicott, C. (1978). D. W. W.: a reflection. In: J. Kanter (Ed.), Face to Face with Children: The Life and Work of Clare Winnicott (pp. 237–253). London: Karnac, 2004. Winnicott, C. (1982). D. W. Winnicott: his life and work.

Rescuing Psychoanalysis from Freud and Other Essays in Re Vision

In his latest groundbreaking book, the author examines the history of psychoanalysis from a resolutely independent perspective. At once spellbinding case histories and meticulously crafted gems of scholarship, Rudnytsky's essays are "re-visions" in that each sheds fresh light on its subject but they are also avowedly "revisionist" in their scepticism towards all forms of psychoanalytic orthodoxy. Beginning with a judicious reappraisal of Freud and ranging in scope from King Lear to contemporary neuroscience, the author treats in depth the lives and work of Ferenczi, Jung, Stekel, Winnicott, Coltart, and Little, each of whom sought to "rescue psychoanalysis" by summoning it to live up to its highest ideals.

Francis of Assisi as Artist of the Spiritual Life

Rosemary Dinnage, "A Bit of Light," in Between Reality and Fantasy: Winnicott's Concepts of Transitional Objects and Phenomena, ed. Simon A. Grolnick and Leonard Barkin (Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson Inc., 1995), 366. 6. D.W. Winnicott ...

Francis of Assisi as Artist of the Spiritual Life

This book applies modern psychological understanding to a historical person. This work focuses on one aspect — Francis' imagination — and an analysis of Francis' writings builds on a survey of modern views of the imagination and the approach of Object Relations Theory.