Dangerous Citizens

Can we map how and in what way she has been made dangerous and, even
more, what sorts of daily realities, lived experiences, memories, thoughts, and
speech acts this construction has produced for her? How it has organized her life,
and ...

Dangerous Citizens

This book simultaneously tells a story—or rather, stories—and a history. The stories are those of Greek Leftists as paradigmatic figures of abjection, given that between 1929 and 1974 tens of thousands of Greek dissidents were detained and tortured in prisons, places of exile, and concentration camps. They were sometimes held for decades, in subhuman conditions of toil and deprivation. The history is that of how the Greek Left was constituted by the Greek state as a zone of danger. Legislation put in place in the early twentieth century postulated this zone. Once the zone was created, there was always the possibility—which came to be a horrific reality after the Greek Civil War of 1946 to 1949—that the state would populate it with its own citizens. Indeed, the Greek state started to do so in 1929, by identifying ever-increasing numbers of citizens as “Leftists” and persecuting them with means extending from indefinite detention to execution. In a striking departure from conventional treatments, Neni Panourgiá places the Civil War in a larger historical context, within ruptures that have marked Greek society for centuries. She begins the story in 1929, when the Greek state set up numerous exile camps on isolated islands in the Greek archipelago. The legal justification for these camps drew upon laws reaching back to 1871—originally directed at controlling “brigands”—that allowed the death penalty for those accused and the banishment of their family members and anyone helping to conceal them. She ends with the 2004 trial of the Revolutionary Organization 17 November. Drawing on years of fieldwork, Panourgiá uses ethnographic interviews, archival material, unpublished personal narratives, and memoirs of political prisoners and dissidents to piece together the various microhistories of a generation, stories that reveal how the modern Greek citizen was created as a fraught political subject. Her book does more than give voice to feelings and experiences suppressed for decades. It establishes a history for the notion of indefinite detention that appeared as a legal innovation with the Bush administration. Part of its roots, Panourgiá shows, lie in the laboratory that Greece provided for neo-colonialism after the Truman Doctrine and under the Marshall Plan.

Dangerous Citizens

This book is a riveting, theoretically astute, and eloquently written account of collaboration, betrayal, and endurance.

Dangerous Citizens

WINNER OF THE 2011 VICTOR TURNER PRIZE, Society for Humanistic Anthropology WINNER OF THE 2011 EDMUND KEELEY BOOK PRIZE, Modern Greek Studies Association HONORABLE MENTION IN ARCHEOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY, 2009 Prose Awards This book simultaneously tells a story-or rather, stories-and a history. The stories are those of Greek Leftists as paradigmatic figures of abjection, given that between 1929 and 1974 tens of thousands of Greek dissidents were detained and tortured in prisons, places of exile, and concentration camps. They were sometimes held for decades, in subhuman conditions of toil and deprivation.The history is that of how the Greek Left was constituted by the Greek state as a zone of danger. Legislation put in place in the early twentieth century postulated this zone. Once the zone was created, there was always the possibility-which came to be a horrific reality after the Greek Civil War of 1946 to 1949-that the state would populate it with its own citizens. Indeed, the Greek state started to do so in 1929, by identifying ever-increasing numbers of citizens as Leftistsand persecuting them with means extending from indefinite detention to execution. In a striking departure from conventional treatments, Neni Panourgi\~ places the Civil War in a larger historical context, within ruptures that have marked Greek society for centuries. She begins the story in 1929, when the Greek state set up numerous exile camps on isolated islands in the Greek archipelago. The legal justification for these camps drew upon laws reaching back to 1871-originally directed at controlling brigands-that allowed the death penalty for those accused and the banishment of their family members and anyone helping to conceal them. She ends with the 2004 trial of the Revolutionary Organization 17 November.Drawing on years of fieldwork, Panourgi\~ uses ethnographic interviews, archival material, unpublished personal narratives, and memoirs of political prisoners and dissidents to piece together the various microhistories of a generation, stories that reveal how the modern Greek citizen was created as a fraught political subject.Her book does more than give voice to feelings and experiences suppressed for decades. It establishes a history for the notion of indefinite detention that appeared as a legal innovation with the Bush administration. Part of its roots, Panourgi\~ shows, lie in the laboratory that Greece provided for neo-colonialism after the Truman Doctrine and under the Marshall Plan.

An Address to the Citizens Inhabitants of Canterbury on the dangerous assumption of privilege by the House of Commons particulary directed to those who attended the Public Meeting on Monday the 14th of May 1810 By an Inhabitant Signed Candidus

AN ADDRESS TO THE CITIZENS & INHABITANTS OF CANTERBURY , on the
dangerous ASSUMPTION OF PRIVILEGE BY THE HOUSE OF COMMONS ,
Particularly directed to those who attended the PUBLIC MEETING , on MONDAY
THE ...

An Address to the Citizens   Inhabitants of Canterbury  on the dangerous assumption of privilege by the House of Commons  particulary directed to those who attended the Public Meeting on Monday the 14th of May  1810  By an Inhabitant   Signed  Candidus


The Citizens Prisons Produce

As might be expected , officers working in Level I prisons consider almost half of
the inmates they work with ( 45 % ) to be ' not dangerous ' by officers , and only a
small percentage ( 18 % ) of inmates at this security level to be ' very dangerous ...

The Citizens Prisons Produce


Citizen Power

There is absolutely no evidence that mental patients are more dangerous than
average citizens , and plenty of evidence that they are less dangerous . Some
mentally ill are dangerous , of course , but the important point , says Ennis , “ is
that a ...

Citizen Power


Reports to the California Citizens Commission on Tort Reform Government liability

By contrast , given the provisions in the 1963 Act , if a state highway is designed
in a way that makes the highway unduly dangerous for speeding cars , the state
is free of liability notwithstanding the foreseeability of speeding , since speeding ...

Reports to the California Citizens  Commission on Tort Reform  Government liability


The Dangerous Flammable Fabrics

This text places an emphasis on the value of a warning label, which should be mandated on all new clothing to reduce the flammable fabric injuries and fatalities each year.

The Dangerous Flammable Fabrics

Unlocking the secret behind successful Spas... The perfect resoure for the new Spa Managers, Spa DIrectors and the entrepreneur therapist. As you discover and unlock the keys to becoming successful in the spa industry you will feel inspired to grow your business. In this informative resource, Spa Secrets of SUccess gives comprehensive understanding to: * Return on Investment * How to Select Products for Your Spa * Stepping into Spa Director Shoes * Meeting Guest Expectation * Step-by-step to Opening Doors * Developing Your Culture * Building a Team ...and many more that will inspire you to reach for new levels in the industry. Included are key Tools that you will need to get started and the keys that will unlock your true potential.

Tennessee the Dangerous Example Watauga to 1849

In order , therefore , to reclaim such citizens , who by specious pretenses and the
acts of designing men , have been seduced from their allegiance , to restrain
others from following their example who are wavering , and to confirm the ...

Tennessee  the Dangerous Example  Watauga to 1849


Dangerous Liaisons

Also important to note is that at the end of the narrative , Maria Fe no longer
counts on marriage , thus negating the function of woman as producers of
citizens according to conventional nationalist discourse . She has more work to
accomplish ...

Dangerous Liaisons


American Citizenship as Distinguished from Alien Status

And he hears these same " practical ” men condemn the dissenters as "
dangerous citizens , " " trouble makers , ” " impractical idealists " or " persons who
are undermining the confidence of the people in our institutions . ” And the youth
either ...

American Citizenship as Distinguished from Alien Status


Black Yellow Dogs

Their leadership tends to commit them to the Democratic Party. They vote without regard to Candidates or issues. This book is designed to encourage them to vote "principle" not "party.

Black Yellow Dogs

Black Yellow Dogs was written specifically to address the failure of the African American community to vote according to principle. Their leadership tends to commit them to the Democratic Party. They vote without regard to Candidates or issues. This book is designed to encourage them to vote "principle" not "party." The book is also written to help bridge the gap between conservatives and Blacks, who are natural allies, and to dispel some of the myths that each group holds about the other.

Citizens in the Making

Dangerous Places on the Way to School . ( a ) In the space below draw a line
showing the road or street you must take going to school . ( b ) Mark with a cross -
line the streets or roads you must cross . cros OSS . ( c ) Mark with an “ X ” all of
the ...

Citizens in the Making


Policewomen on Patrol Methodology and tables

If for example Citizen # 1 was just upset and Citizen # 2 was angry but not
dangerous , Citizen # 1 would not be ... We are interested in who the citizens
were angry or violent toward ; it is possible that a citizen will not be directing his
or her ...

Policewomen on Patrol  Methodology and tables

Comparison of 80 female police and 80 male recruits during the first four months of patrol duty. In early 1972, police Chief Jerry V. Wilson of Washington, DC began to hire and assign to regular police patrol duties a substantial number of women. This report also noted the performance of 27 policewomen who were reassigned to patrol duties. The instruments used to measure effectiveness were official records, ratings, accounts of observers riding in patrol cars, anonymous police attitude surveys, and interviews with members of the public who had received services from the police. It was found that the women had substantially the same assignments as the men, but were assigned more senior partners. New women and new men made approximately the same number of arrests and were rated about the same in general patrol skills on Chief Wilson's survey. Unsigned surveys, however, showed negative attitudes toward policewomen on the part of patrolmen, both before and after assignment of women to patrol, and a rating of 'less competent' by captains, lieutenants, and sergeants. Police service given by both men and women was equally acceptable to citizens who rated both groups highly for their attitudes, respect for citizens, and their ability to handle a variety of situations. In the four months treated by the report, the new officers had been involved in few situations involving violence or potential violence. In those few situations there was little difference between men and women.

Citizens in the Making Through a Program of Pupil Activity

SECOND PERIOD . - Problem 5 . Dangerous Places on the Way to School . ( a )
In the space below draw a line showing the road or street you must take going to
school . 100l . ( b ) Mark with a cross - line the streets or roads you must cross .

Citizens in the Making Through a Program of Pupil Activity


Skin Scuba Diver s Digest

Characteristics And Expected Behavior Of Some Of The Potentially Dangerous
Citizens Of The Liquid World UNDERWATER INHABITANTS White , mako and
tiger sharks share similar configurations . Chapter VOLUMES HAVE BEEN filled
 ...

Skin   Scuba Diver s Digest


Annual Report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners for the Year Ending

... French , D . A . , road supervisor , Rowan , v . B . , C . R . & N . , petition for . .
1892 Funk , J . H . Iowa Falls , v . Ill . Cent . , dangerous and dark street crossing .
1896 Gafford , Joseph , Burlington , v . Citizens of Murray , dangerous obstruction
.

Annual Report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners for the Year Ending


The Dangerous and the Endangered

The streets still seem dangerous , whether they are or not . Many citizens firmly
believe that violent men , women , and children roam the cities , unrestrained and
flouting all efforts to restrain them . The crime problem lends itself to the proposal
 ...

The Dangerous and the Endangered


Unarmed and Dangerous

The unique data and analysis in this book will inform discussions of police use of force for researchers, policymakers, and students involved in criminal justice, public policy, and policing.

Unarmed and Dangerous

There is tremendous controversy across the United States (and beyond) when a police officer uses deadly force against an unarmed citizen, but often the conversation is devoid of contextual details. These details matter greatly as a matter of law and organizational legitimacy. In this short book, authors Jon Shane and Zoë Swenson offer a comprehensive analysis of the first study to use publicly available data to reveal the context in which an officer used deadly force against an unarmed citizen. Although any police shooting, even a justified shooting, is not a desired outcome—often termed "lawful but awful" in policing circles—it is not necessarily a crime. The results of this study lend support to the notion that being unarmed does not mean "not dangerous," in some ways explaining why most police officers are not indicted when such a shooting occurs. The study’s findings show that when police officers used deadly force during an encounter with an unarmed citizen, the officer or a third person was facing imminent threat of death or serious injury in the vast majority of situations. Moreover, when police officers used force, their actions were almost always consistent with the accepted legal and policy principles that govern law enforcement in the overwhelming proportion of encounters (as measured by indictments). Noting the dearth of official data on the context of police shooting fatalities, Shane and Swenson call for the U.S. government to compile comprehensive data so researchers and practitioners can learn from deadly force encounters and improve practices. They further recommend that future research on police shootings should examine the patterns and micro-interactions between the officer, citizen, and environment in relation to the prevailing law. The unique data and analysis in this book will inform discussions of police use of force for researchers, policymakers, and students involved in criminal justice, public policy, and policing.

Controlling the Dangerous Classes

It was probably also the case where many citizens refused to go along with the
repressive laws laid down by the rulers . Many jurors showed disrespect toward
authorities , such as judges , while many a citizen simply chose to ignore the ...

Controlling the Dangerous Classes

This book covers the history of criminal justice from a critical perspective and explores the historical biases of the criminal justice system. The overall theme of this book is that both the making of laws and the interpretation and application of these laws throughout the history of the criminal justice system has, historically, been class, gender, and racially biased. Moreover, one of the major functions of the criminal justice system has been to control those from the most disadvantaged sectors of the population, that is, the "dangerous classes." This theme is explored using a historical model, tracing the development of criminal law through the development of the police institution, the juvenile justice system, and the prison system. For anyone interested in the history of criminal justice.