Darwinian Natural Right

This book shows how Darwinian biology supports an Aristotelian view of ethics as rooted in human nature.

Darwinian Natural Right

This book shows how Darwinian biology supports an Aristotelian view of ethics as rooted in human nature. Defending a conception of “Darwinian natural right” based on the claim that the good is the desirable, the author argues that there are at least twenty natural desires that are universal to all human societies because they are based in human biology. The satisfaction of these natural desires constitutes a universal standard for judging social practice as either fulfilling or frustrating human nature, although prudence is required in judging what is best for particular circumstances. The author studies the familial bonding of parents and children and the conjugal bonding of men and women as illustrating social behavior that conforms to Darwinian natural right. He also studies slavery and psychopathy as illustrating social behavior that contradicts Darwinian natural right. He argues as well that the natural moral sense does not require religious belief, although such belief can sometimes reinforce the dictates of nature.

Darwinian Natural Right

THE ENDS AND KINDS OF LIFE In defending my notion of Darwinian natural right , I have assumed the reality of natural ends and natural kinds . I have assumed that human beings exist as a distinct species or kind of animal with a ...

Darwinian Natural Right

This book shows how Darwinian biology supports an Aristotelian view of ethics as rooted in human nature. Defending a conception of "Darwinian natural right" based on the claim that the good is the desirable, the author argues that there are at least twenty natural desires that are universal to all human societies because they are based in human biology. The satisfaction of these natural desires constitutes a universal standard for judging social practice as either fulfilling or frustrating human nature, although prudence is required in judging what is best for particular circumstances. The author studies the familial bonding of parents and children and the conjugal bonding of men and women as illustrating social behavior that conforms to Darwinian natural right. He also studies slavery and psychopathy as illustrating social behavior that contradicts Darwinian natural right. He argues as well that the natural moral sense does not require religious belief, although such belief can sometimes reinforce the dictates of nature.

Darwinian Conservatism

Arnhart, Larry, Darwinian Natural Right: The Biological Ethics of Human Nature (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1998). Arnhart, Larry, Michael Behe, William Dembski, “Conservatives, Darwin, and Design: An Exchange,” First ...

Darwinian Conservatism

A reprint of Larry Arnhart's essay Darwinian Conservatism with comment and criticism from a variety of contributors.

Philosophy After Darwin

Darwinian Natural Right: The Biological Ethics of Human Nature. Albany: State University of New York Press. ———. 2001. “Thomistic Natural Law as Darwinian Natural Right.” Social Philosophy and Policy 18 (Winter): 1–33.

Philosophy After Darwin

An anthology of essential writings that cover some of the most influential ideas about the philosophical implications of Darwinism, since the publication of "On the Origin of Species".

Liberalism Conservatism and Hayek s Idea of Spontaneous Order

On the human nature of sexual and familial bonding, see Arnhart, Darwinian Natural Right, 89–160; and “Thomistic Natural Law as Darwinian Natural Right.” von Mises, Socialism, pp. 80–87. See Arnhart, “Thomistic Natural Law as Darwinian ...

Liberalism  Conservatism  and Hayek s Idea of Spontaneous Order

For Hayek, spontaneous order - the emergence of complex order as the unintended consequence of individual actions that have no such end in view - is both the origin of the Great Society and its underlying principle. These sometimes critical essays assess Hayek's position and argue that his work can inform contemporary social and political dilemmas.

Inbreeding Incest and the Incest Taboo

When Aristotle spoke of “natural right”—natural standards of right and wrong—he appealed to the biological ... I argue that a Darwinian science of human nature can explain ethics as conforming to what I call “Darwinian natural right.

Inbreeding  Incest  and the Incest Taboo

Why is incest widely prohibited? Why does the scope of the prohibition vary from society to society? Why does incest occur despite the prohibition? What are the consequences? To reexamine these questions, this book brings together contributions from the fields of genetics, behavioral biology, primatology, biological and social anthropology, philosophy, and psychiatry.

Darwin S Racism

If anything was natural (or natural selection, as Darwin would put it), it was the weaker asserting its rights against the stronger party. And when Darwin finally did appear almost two centuries later, whether he intended it this way or ...

Darwin   S Racism

Throughout the 19th century in the British Empire, parallel developments in science and the law were squeezing Aborigines everywhere into nonexistence. Charles Darwin took part in this. Again and again, he expressed his approval of the extermination of the native lower races. The more interesting part of the story is that there were plenty of voices, albeit a minority and mostly forgotten now, who objected on humanitarian grounds (and sometimes scientific grounds as well). Europeans, they said, were becoming polished savages and dehumanizing the Other. Darwin was very aware of this criticism and cared not one whit. As he said in a letter to Charles Lyell, I care not much whether we are looked at as mere savages in a remotely distant future. But he well knew it was not a remote future. He had read several writers who accused Europeans of being the real savages. For a brief moment in his youth in his Diary, he himself dabbled in such criticism, even though he already believed in the inferiority of indigenous peoples. That belief grew firmer as he matured. Darwin did not dispute humanitarians so much as he ignored them. Its a sad story. But oh those humanitarians, how they inspire.

Legitimizing Human Rights

... we are surely justified in reconsidering the case for a transcendent word as the proper justification for human rights. Bibliography Arnhart, L. 1998. Darwinian Natural Right. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

Legitimizing Human Rights

When does the exercise of an interest constitute a human right? The contributors to Menuge’s edited collection offer a range of secular and religious responses to this fundamental question of the legitimacy of human rights claims. The first section evaluates the plausibility of natural and transcendent foundations for human rights. A further section explores the nature of religious freedom and the vexed question of its proper limits as it arises in the US, European, and global contexts. The final section explores the pragmatic justification of human rights: how do we motivate the recognition and enforcement of human rights in the real world? This topical book should be of interest to a range of academics from disciplines spanning law, philosophy, religion and politics.

The Ethics of Cosmology

Natural Right and the Rediscovery of Design John C. Caiazza ... 38,57 Darwin and the Darwinian Revolution, 56 Darwin's Dangerous Idea, 56 Darwinian Natural Right, 97 Davies, Paul, God and the New Physics, 9 Dawkins, Richard, 38, 43, 46, ...

The Ethics of Cosmology

Within the last one hundred years, the scientific conception of the universe has undergone radical change. As a result a new field has evolved, called "cosmology," that examines the philosophical and scientific nature of the universe. Cosmology conceives of a material universe in which the interior of atoms do not act in the same predictable manner as the objects we can see and in which space is no longer empty volume unaffected by the matter within it. The universe is not a machine that operates with the same set of rules, but rather a living, growing organism. This new cosmology is forcing a consideration of the meaning of life that also calls for a reconsideration of moral law—the doctrine of natural right. Natural law theory is based on a cosmology that is grounded in classical metaphysics. John C. Caiazza uses the term "natural right" rather than "natural law" since his argument for cosmic teleology is based on the cosmology of contemporary science and not that of classical metaphysics. If evolution and development are the key to understanding nature, it is important to get the evolutionary concept of nature right, especially when it involves ethics. The universe can be viewed in two ways. One can admire the intricacy of the cosmological process on the physical, chemical, and astronomical levels. Or, one can look at this process as a result of design or providence. These two options should not preclude each other, Caiazza asserts; we should instead look closely at what science reveals about design. This volume offers an opportunity to reconcile the thinking of those who hold to traditional religious views on the origins of the universe and those who look to scientific explanations.

The Origins and Nature of Sociality

Darwinian Natural Right : The Biological Ethics of Human Nature . Albany : SUNY Press . Arnhart , Larry . 2001. “ Thomistic Natural Law as Darwinian Natural Right . ” Social Philosophy and Policy 18 ( Winter ) : 1-33 .

The Origins and Nature of Sociality

Scientific developments have increasingly been transforming our understanding of the place of human beings in nature. The contributors to this book focus on the current status of research on sociality and the evolution of cooperative and altruistic behaviour in non-human and human primates. They examine questions related to the evolution, cultural viability, and hormonal underpinnings of human sociality in specific detail, and describe patterns of sociality that shed light on human social behaviour.

Vera Lex

Albany : State University of New York Press , 1998 Reviewed by Victoria M. Wulf CUNY , Staten Island > In his book Darwinian Natural Right : The Biological Ethics of Human Nature , Larry Arnhart attempts to blend Aristotelian political ...

Vera Lex


Politics and the Life Sciences

Armed with this biopolitical theory, Arnhart explores several illustrations of how Darwinian natural right can be used to distinguish between social relationships that are in accordance with nature and those that are not.

Politics and the Life Sciences

This book examines the development of biopolitics as an academic perspective within political science. It reviews the work of the leading proponents of this perspective and presents a comprehensive view of biopolitics as a framework to structure political inquiry.

Thomas Hobbes and the Natural Law

Hence, feigned persons turn out to be simply natural persons, albeit natural persons dissembling. ... of Hobbes's argument from the perspective of Darwinian biological science, see Larry Arnhart, Darwinian Natural Right: The Biological ...

Thomas Hobbes and the Natural Law

Has Hobbesian moral and political theory been fundamentally misinterpreted by most of his readers? Since the criticism of John Bramhall, Hobbes has generally been regarded as advancing a moral and political theory that is antithetical to classical natural law theory. Kody Cooper challenges this traditional interpretation of Hobbes in Thomas Hobbes and the Natural Law. Hobbes affirms two essential theses of classical natural law theory: the capacity of practical reason to grasp intelligible goods or reasons for action and the legally binding character of the practical requirements essential to the pursuit of human flourishing. Hobbes’s novel contribution lies principally in his formulation of a thin theory of the good. This book seeks to prove that Hobbes has more in common with the Aristotelian-Thomistic tradition of natural law philosophy than has been recognized. According to Cooper, Hobbes affirms a realistic philosophy as well as biblical revelation as the ground of his philosophical-theological anthropology and his moral and civil science. In addition, Cooper contends that Hobbes's thought, although transformative in important ways, also has important structural continuities with the Aristotelian-Thomistic tradition of practical reason, theology, social ontology, and law. What emerges from this study is a nuanced assessment of Hobbes’s place in the natural law tradition as a formulator of natural law liberalism. This book will appeal to political theorists and philosophers and be of particular interest to Hobbes scholars and natural law theorists.

Darwinian Evolution and Classical Liberalism

Darwinian Evolution and Classical Liberalism brings together a collection of new essays that examine the multifaceted ferment between Darwinian biology and classical liberalism.

Darwinian Evolution and Classical Liberalism

Darwinian Evolution and Classical Liberalism brings together a collection of new essays that examine the multifaceted ferment between Darwinian biology and classical liberalism.

Darwinian Populations and Natural Selection

In 1859 Darwin described a deceptively simple mechanism that he called "natural selection," a combination of variation, inheritance, and reproductive success.

Darwinian Populations and Natural Selection

In 1859 Darwin described a deceptively simple mechanism that he called "natural selection," a combination of variation, inheritance, and reproductive success. He argued that this mechanism was the key to explaining the most puzzling features of the natural world. The exact nature of the Darwinian process has been controversial ever since. Draws on new developments in biology, philosophy of science, and other fields to give a new analysis and extension of Darwin's idea. The central concept used is that of a "Darwinian population," a collection of things with the capacity to undergo change by natural selection. From this starting point, new analyses of the role of genes in evolution, the application of Darwinian ideas to cultural change, and "evolutionary transitions" that produce complex organisms and societies are developed.

Darwin and Hegel

Hobbes , like Thrasymachus in Plato's Republic , makes all laws ( legal and moral ) dependent on the will of a sovereign ; in the phraseology of his own theory he allows no natural rights ( with the inconsistent exception of the right ...

Darwin and Hegel

This late 19th-century work is a study of the theories of Charles Darwin, Hegel, Plato, Locke and others.

God and Morality

The example I have in mind is Larry Arnhart's book Darwinian Natural Right.117 This book is an example of how the new discipline of evolutionary psychology (a revised version of what was called “sociobiology” in the 1980s) has been ...

God and Morality

God and Morality evaluates the ethical theories of four principle philosophers, Aristotle, Duns Scotus, Kant, and R.M. Hare. Uses their thinking as the basis for telling the story of the history and development of ethical thought more broadly Focuses specifically on their writings on virtue, will, duty, and consequence Concentrates on the theistic beliefs to highlight continuity of philosophical thought

Charles Darwin s Natural Selection

Being the Second Part of His Big Species Book Written from 1856 to 1858 Charles Darwin R. C. Stauffer, Sydney Smith, Stan P. Rachootin. facets & lenses . ... Have we any right to suppose that the Creator works by the same means as man ?

Charles Darwin s Natural Selection

An original, unpublished manuscript written before the Origin of Species which contains the references to journal articles and books that Darwin used in formulating his controversial ideas. This volume has been edited and annotated and includes a cross-indexing to the Origin.

Civil Society and Government

For example , Larry Arnhart argues that natural law political theory can be given a modern scientific foundation , in Darwinian Natural Right : The Biological Ethics of Human Nature ( Albany : State University of New York Press , 1998 ) ...

Civil Society and Government

Publisher Description

Christian Apologetics

In The Origin of Species, Darwin himself speaks of “laws impressed on matter by the Creator” and of life “having been ... See Larry Arnhart, Darwinian Natural Right: The Biological Ethics of Human Nature (Albany: State University of New ...

Christian Apologetics

For the first time in over one hundred years, the significant writings of history’s most notable Christian apologists are available in one ebook. The Anthology of Christian Apologetics seeks to represent a broad Christian spectrum, ranging from those as early as Saint Paul and Saint Augustine, Saint Teresa of Avila and Blaise Pascal, to more recent and present day apologists such as C. S. Lewis, Alvin Plantinga, William Lane Craig, Richard Swinburne, and Pope Benedict XVI. Over fifty entries address key issues in the history of Christian apologetics. Introductions provide general overviews and guides to the topical arrangements of these issues. Photographs of the major apologists enliven the work and concise section headings clearly organize the material. Discussion questions, annotated reading lists, a bibliography, and author and subject indexes contribute to the suitability of this anthology as a textbook or supplemental reader. People interested in Christian thought, history, apologetics, philosophy, theology, or religion will find that the scope and depth of this anthology makes it an authoritative reference for key persons, concepts, issues, and approaches in the history of Christian apologetics.