The Osterman Weekend

A Novel

The Osterman Weekend

In Zurich . . . in Moscow . . . in Washington, D.C. . . . the machinery has already been set in motion. In a quiet suburb, an odd assortment of men and women gather for a momentous weekend. At stake is nothing less than the very existence of the United States of America—and, with it, the future of the entire free world. Praise for Robert Ludlum and The Osterman Weekend “Shattering . . . [The Osterman Weekend] will cost you the night and the cold hours of the morning.”—The Cincinnati Enquirer “Ludlum stuffs more surprises into his novels than any other six-pack of thriller writers combined.”—The New York Times “Powerhouse momentum . . . as shrill as the siren on the prowl car.”—Kirkus Reviews “A complex scenario of inventive double-crossing.”—Chicago Sun-Times BONUS: This edition includes an excerpt from Robert Ludlum’s The Bourne Identity.

Peckinpah Today

New Essays on the Films of Sam Peckinpah

Peckinpah Today

Normal0falsefalsefalseEN-USX-NONEX-NONE Written exclusively for this collection by today’s leading Peckinpah critics, the nine essays in Peckinpah Today explore the body of work of one of America’s most important filmmakers, revealing new insights into his artistic process and the development of his lasting themes. Edited by Michael Bliss, this book provides groundbreaking criticism of Peckinpah’s work by illuminating new sources, from modified screenplay documents to interviews with screenplay writers and editors. Included is a rare interview with A. S. Fleischman, author of the screenplay for The Deadly Companions, the film that launched Peckinpah’s career in feature films. The collection also contains essays by scholar Stephen Prince and Paul Seydor, editor of the controversial special edition of Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid. In his essay on Straw Dogs, film critic Michael Sragow reveals how Peckinpah and co-scriptwriter David Zelag Goodman transformed a pulp novel into a powerful film. The final essay of the collection surveys Peckinpah’s career, showing the dark turn that the filmmaker’s artistic path took between his first and last films. This comprehensive approach reinforces the book’s dawn-to-dusk approach, resulting in a fascinating picture of a great filmmaker’s work.

Doing it Right

The Best Criticism on Sam Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch

Doing it Right

Warner Bros.'s withdrawal of Peckinpah's cut of the film drew tremendous sympathy for Peckinpah from American and European film critics alike.

Justified Lives

Morality & Narrative in the Films of Sam Peckinpah

Justified Lives

In the first book to critically examine each of the fourteen feature films Sam Peckinpah directed during his career, Michael Bliss stresses the persistent moral and structural elements that permeate Peckinpah’s work. By examining the films in great detail, Bliss makes clear the moral framework of temptation and redemption with which Peckinpah was concerned while revealing the director’s attention to narrative. Bliss shows that each of Peckinpah’s protagonists is involved with attempting, in the words of Ride the High Country’s Steve Judd, "to enter my house justified." The validity of this systematic method is clearly demonstrated in the chapter devoted to The Wild Bunch. By enumerating the doublings and triplings of action and dialogue found in the film, Bliss underscores its symbolic and structural complexity. Beginning the chapters treating Junior Bonner and The Getaway with analyses of their important title sequences, Bliss shows how these frequently disregarded pieces present in miniature the major moral and narrative concerns of the films. In his chapter on The Osterman Weekend, Bliss makes apparent Peckinpahs awareness of and concern with the self-reflexive nature of filmmaking itself. Bliss shows that like John Ford, Peckinpah moved from optimism to pessimism. The films of the director’s early period, from The Deadly Companions to Cable Hogue, support the romantic ideals of adventure and camaraderie and affirm a potential for goodness in America. In his second group of films, which begins with Straw Dogs and ends with Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia, both heroes and hope have vanished. It is only in The Osterman Weekend that Peckinpah appears finally to have renewed his capacity for hope, allowing his career to close in a positive way.

Music Composition for Film and Television

Music Composition for Film and Television

(Berklee Guide). Learn film-scoring techniques from one of the great film/television composers of our time. Lalo Schifrin shares his insights into the intimate relationship between music and drama. The book is illustrated with extended excerpts from his most iconic scores such as Mission: Impossible , Cool Hand Luke , Bullitt and many others and peppered with anecdotes from inside the Hollywood studios. Schifrin reveals the technical details of his own working approach, which has earned him six Oscar nominations, 21 Grammy nominations (with four awards), and credits on hundreds of major productions. Includes the full score of Schifrin's Fanfare for Screenplay and Orchestra , a treasure-trove of unfettered dramatic sound painting, commissioned by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, and a great thesis on the emblematic language of film music.

The Cinema of George A. Romero

Knight of the Living Dead

The Cinema of George A. Romero

In this comprehensive portrait of horror's definitive director, Tony Williams ties George A. Romero's films to the development of literary naturalism and American culture, expanding the artist's creative footprint beyond his mastery of the "splatter movie" genre. Williams locates Romero's influences in the work of Emile Zola, the Entertainment Comics of the 1950s, and the novels of Stephen King, revealing the interdisciplinary depth of his seminal films Night of the Living Dead (1968), Creepshow (1982), Monkey Shines (1988), and The Dark Half (1992). For this second edition, Williams reads Romero's Bruiser (2000) against his more recent Land of the Dead (2005) and takes a fresh look at Diary of the Dead (2007) and Survival of the Dead (2009), two overlooked films that feature Romero's greatest achievements yet.

The Cassandra Compact

The Cassandra Compact

A brilliant Covert-One novel from 'the real Titan of the genre' GQ Yuri Danko, an officer in the medical division of Russia's security service, is murdered in a spray of assassin's bullets. Now Covert-One's Jon Smith has Danko's classified papers, and he's unearthed a terrifying global conspiracy. A Serb terrorist has been despatched from Russia to smuggle hazardous vials of a deadly bacteria into the United States. His mission: to deliver them to an unknown US government agent. Then both men are murdered, and the deadly bacteria is stolen...It's up to Lt Col. Smith to find the madman who possesses it, before he holds a defenseless world hostage with the power to render the human race extinct.

The Chancellor Manuscript

A Novel

The Chancellor Manuscript

Did J. Edgar Hoover die a natural death? Or was he murdered? When a group of high-minded and high-placed intellectuals known as Inver Brass detect a monstrous threat to the country in Hoover’s unethical use of his scandal-ridden private files, they decide to do away with him—quietly, efficiently, with no hint of impropriety. Then bestselling thriller writer Peter Chancellor stumbles onto information that makes his previous books look like harmless fairy tales. Now Chancellor and Inver Brass are on a deadly collision course, spiraling across the globe in an ever-widening arc of violence and terror. All roads lead to a showdown that will rip the nation’s capital apart—leaving only one damning document to survive. Praise for Robert Ludlum and The Chancellor Manuscript “[The Chancellor Manuscript] exerts a riveting appeal, as it seems to justify our worst nightmares of what really goes on in the so-called intelligence community in Washington.”—The New York Times Book Review “Ludlum stuffs more surprises into his novels than any other six-pack of thriller writers combined.”—The New York Times “Powerhouse momentum . . . as shrill as the siren on the prowl car.”—Kirkus Reviews “A complex scenario of inventive double-crossing.”—Chicago Sun-Times BONUS: This edition includes an excerpt from Robert Ludlum’s The Bourne Identity.

The Gemini Contenders

The Gemini Contenders

Pandora's Box is about to be opened...A brilliant, fast-paced thriller from the internationally bestselling author of the Bourne series. December 1939. A train winds its way through Italy towards the Alps wth a cargo too precious to destroy, too awful to reveal. On board is an iron box. Its sinister contents - documents concealed for centuries - could rip apart the Christian world and set religion against religion, an entire people against another. Now, as the Nazi threat marches closer, good men and evil are drawn into a violent and deadly hunt. The richest aristocrat in Italy is responsible for the documents' safety, but he's been marked for death by the Nazis. Some people want the secrets told. Some people want to plunge the world into a catastrophic holy war...