Dating Deuteronomy

For example, the Decalogue appears twice in the Pentateuch, in Exodus 20:2–17 and in Deuteronomy 5:6–21. The fourth commandment, “Remember the Sabbath Day” (Exod 20:8), explains the Sabbath law as follows: For in six days YHWH made ...

Dating Deuteronomy

The Torah was recognized as a unit before the separation between the kingdoms of Judah and Israel. This book challenges established biblical scholarship derived from two assumptions of the Wellhausen Fallacy: a) Deuteronomy could not have been written before the time of Josiah (650 BCE); b) The existence of a group of redactors in the fifth century BCE or later. The first premise is based on the mistranslation of the biblical text. The second is based on the unlikely assumption that the scribes of the Second Temple era felt free to edit old documents or to ascribe their own writings to Mosaic times. The Samarian version of the Pentateuch is virtually identical to the traditional (Masoretic) text. It is preposterous to assume that the Samarians would accept a fictitious Torah composed by Judean exiles of the Persian period or later as authoritative. Neither Samarians nor Judeans copied the Pentateuch from each other. The biblical text and the Samarian texts are merely different editions of the same document.

Provenance of Deuteronomy Thirty two

However , nothing seems to be incompatable with an early dating . Deuteronomy 32:35 Colon 35aA stresses that Yhwh alone is the subject of vengeance ( opa , 050 ) and not the enemies . Yhwh's vengeance will now strike the enemies ...

Provenance of Deuteronomy Thirty two

A survey of previous literature about the provenance of the song in Deuteronomy 32 and a discussion of its text and poetic structure. The author concludes that the song dates from the pre-exilic period.

Ezekiel and the World of Deuteronomy

The recurrence of links provides cumulative evidence that Ezekiel may have known and used Deuteronomy 4. Dating Deuteronomy 4 The suggestion that Ezekiel knew Deuteronomy 4 might seem to be at odds with the widely held view that the ...

Ezekiel and the World of Deuteronomy

Jason Gile argues that the ideas of Deuteronomy influenced Ezekiel's response to the crisis surrounding the fall of Jerusalem and the Babylonian exile in significant ways, shaping how he saw Israel's past history of rebellion against Yahweh, present situation of divine judgment, and future hope of restoration. By examining Ezekiel's use of Deuteronomy's language and concepts, Gile stresses that the prophet not only accepted distinctive elements of Deuteronomic theology but in some cases drew from specific texts. The main body of this volume describes Deuteronomy's influence on Ezekiel under five main categories: Ezekiel's language and conception of idolatry, the rise and fall of Israel in chapter 16, Ezekiel's view of Israel's history in chapter 20, the scattering of Israel as an image for exile, and the related motif of gathering as an image for return to the land. Gile concludes that Ezekiel's use of its language for his messages of indictment, judgment, and hope shows that the prophet regarded Deuteronomy, along with the Holiness Code, as Yahweh's torah given to Israel in the wilderness.

Deuteronomy

The literary form of Deuteronomy (see below) may also contribute to one's conclusions concerning the date of the book's composition. Although the book of Deuteronomy is substantially from Moses, a small portion of it was added by ...

Deuteronomy

Continuing a Gold Medallion Award-winning legacy, this completely revised edition of The Expositor’s Bible Commentary series puts world-class biblical scholarship in your hands. Based on the original twelve-volume set that has become a staple in college and seminary libraries and pastors’ studies worldwide, this new thirteen-volume edition marshals the most current evangelical scholarship and resources. The thoroughly revised features consist of: • Comprehensive introductions • Short and precise bibliographies • Detailed outlines • Insightful expositions of passages and verses • Overviews of sections of Scripture to illuminate the big picture • Occasional reflections to give more detail on important issues • Notes on textual questions and special problems, placed close to the texts in question • Transliterations and translations of Hebrew and Greek words, enabling readers to understand even the more technical notes • A balanced and respectful approach toward marked differences of opinion

Human Rights in Deuteronomy

However, he paradoxically dated these legal corpora diachronically.20 Another variation appeared in 2002 with E. Otto's Gottes Recht als Menschenrecht: Rechts und literaturhistorische studien zum Deuteronomium that placed Deuteronomy in ...

Human Rights in Deuteronomy

The humanitarian concerns of the biblical slave laws and their rhetorical techniques rarely receive scholarly attention, especially the two slave laws in Deuteronomy. Previous studies that compared the biblical and the ANE laws focused primarily on their similarities and developed theories of direct borrowing. This ignored the fact that legal transplants were common in ancient societies. This study, in contrast, aims to identify similarities and dissimilarities in order to pursue an understanding of the underlying values promoted within these slave laws and the interests they protected. To do so, certain innovative methodologies were applied. The biblical laws examined present two diverse legal concepts that contrast to the ANE concepts: (1) all agents are regarded as persons and should be treated accordingly, and (2) all legal subjects are seen as free, dignified, and self-determining human beings. In addition, the biblical laws often distinguish an offender’s “criminal intent,” by which a criminal’s rights are also considered. Based on these features, the biblical laws are able to articulate YHWH’s humanitarian concerns and the basic concepts of human rights presented in Deuteronomy.

Deuteronomy and the Hermeneutics of Legal Innovation

Among those dating P before Deuteronomy are Haran, Temples, 132–48; Avi Hurwitz, A Linguistic Study of the Relationship between the Priestly Source and the Book of Ezekiel (Cahr B 20; Paris: J. Gabalda, 1982; Richard Elliott Friedman, ...

Deuteronomy and the Hermeneutics of Legal Innovation

"...[O]ne will not be able to do serious study of Deuteronomy without consulting this book."--The Bible Today. "...this innovative study...will recharge the study of biblical legal literature."--Religious Studies Review.

Deuteronomy

Juha Pakkala (“The Date of the Oldest Edition of Deuteronomy,” ZAW 121 [2009]: 388–401) offers ten arguments for dating Deuteronomy in the Persian period. Most of his arguments fit more naturally in the premonarchic period than in the ...

Deuteronomy

Arranged as a series of sermons, the book of Deuteronomy represents the final major segment of the biography of Moses. The sermons review events described in earlier books and challenges Israel to faithful living in the future. The theological significance of Deuteronomy cannot be overestimated. Few books in the Bible proclaim such a relevant word of grace and gospel to the church today. At its heart, Deuteronomy records the covenantal relationship between God and his people. God graciously has chosen Israel as his covenant partner and has demonstrated his covenantal commitment to them. Moses challenges the Israelites to respond by declaring that Yahweh alone is their God and by demonstrating unwavering loyalty and total love for him through obedience. Daniel Block highlights the unity between the God depicted in Deuteronomy and Jesus Christ. Christians who understand the covenantal character of God and who live under the grace of Christ will resist the temptation to retreat into interior and subjective understandings of the life of faith so common in Western Christianity.

Adopting the Stranger as Kindred in Deuteronomy

framework of deuteronomy, namely, that the dc fosters the incorporation of the gēr within a household and a clan, ... approach to dating deuteronomy, on the basis of economic and social history.120 1.3.4. legal revision Some comments ...

Adopting the Stranger as Kindred in Deuteronomy

Investigate how Deuteronomy incorporates vulnerable, displaced people Deuteronomy addresses social contexts of widespread displacement, an issue affecting 65 million people today. In this book Mark R. Glanville investigates how Deuteronomy fosters the integration of the stranger as kindred into the community of Yahweh. According to Deuteronomy, displaced people are to be enfolded within the household, within the clan, and within the nation. Glanville argues that Deuteronomy demonstrates the immense creativity that communities may invest in enfolding displaced and vulnerable people. Inclusivism is nourished through social law, the law of judicial procedure, communal feasting, and covenant renewal. Deuteronomy’s call to include the stranger as kindred presents contemporary nation-states with an opportunity and a responsibility to reimagine themselves and their disposition toward displaced strangers today. Features: Exploration of the relationship of ancient Israel’s social history to biblical texts An integrative methodology that brings together literary-historical, legal, sociological, comparative, literary, and theological approaches A thorough study of Israelite identity and ethnicity

Deuteronomy 28 and the Aramaic Curse Tradition

Similarly, I suggest that Deuteronomy 28 also makes best sense when placed in close temporal proximity to the scriptural ... For a recent overview of the scholarship concerning the dating of Deuteronomy, see M. Pietsch, Die Kultreform ...

Deuteronomy 28 and the Aramaic Curse Tradition

This study considers the relationship of Deuteronomy 28 to the curse traditions of the ancient Near East. It focuses on the linguistic and cultural means of the transmission of these traditions to the book of Deuteronomy. Laura Quick examines a broad range of materials, including Old Aramaic inscriptions, attempting to show the value of these Northwest Semitic texts as primary sources to reorient our view of an ancient world usually seen through a biblical or Mesopotamian lens. By studying these inscriptions alongside the biblical text, Deuteronomy 28 and the Aramaic Curse Tradition increases our knowledge of the early history and function of the curses in Deuteronomy 28. This has implications for our understanding of the date of the composition of the book of Deuteronomy, and the reasons behind its production. The ritual realm which stands behind the use of curses and the formation of covenants in the biblical world is also explored, arguing that the interplay between orality and literacy is essential to understanding the function and form of the curses in Deuteronomy. This book contributes to our understanding of the book of Deuteronomy and its place within the literary history of ancient Israel and Judah, with implications for the composition of the Pentateuch or Torah as a whole.

Deuteronomy in the Making

See further the debate between Juha Pakkala (“Date”; “Dating”) and Nathan MacDonald (“Issues”) on the dating of Deuteronomy. 101 Arnold, “Number Switching,” 178; Richelle, “Elusive Scrolls.” 102 Driver, Critical Deuteronomy, li–lii; ...

Deuteronomy in the Making

A number of long-standing theories concerning the production of Deuteronomy are currently being revisited. This volume takes a fresh look at the theory that there was an independent legal collection comprising chs 12-26 that subsequently was set within one or two narrative frames to yield the book, with ongoing redactional changes. Each contributor has been asked to focus on how the “core” might have functioned as a stand-alone document or, if exploring a theme or motif, to take note of commonalities and differences within the “core” and “frames” that might shed light on the theory under review. Some of the articles also revisit the theory of a northern origin of the “core” of the book, while others challenge de Wette’s equation of Deuteronomy with the scroll found during temple repairs under Josiah. With Deuteronomic studies in a state of flux, this is a timely collection by a group of international scholars who use a range of methods and who, in varying degrees, work with or challenge older theories about the book’s origin and growth to approach the central focus from many angles. Readers will find multivalent evidence they can reflect over to decide where they stand on the issue of Deuteronomy as a framed legal “core.”

The Command to Exterminate the Canaanites Deuteronomy 7

The second objection against dating Deuteronomy on the basis of the alleged structure of the book is that it has not been shown that similarity in structure ipso facto stems from a similar date. It is also conceivable that it is ...

The Command to Exterminate the Canaanites  Deuteronomy 7

In The Command to Exterminate the Canaanites: Deuteronomy 7, Arie Versluis analyzes the content and background of the Old Testament command to exterminate the nations of Canaan and discusses the moral and theological questions it evokes.

Deuteronomy

Israel election 10-13 in the revelation at Horeb ( Deut 5.19-27 ) 15-17 , 22 , 30 in the revelation at Sinai ( Deut 4.32–40 ) ... in Deuteronomy 1 , 2 Josiah liturgical reforms 97 , 101 , 116 military reforms 166–7 reforms , and dating of ...

Deuteronomy

This is a major study on the book of Deuteronomy by an acclaimed expert in the field.Paying particular attention to the legal passages in Deuteronomy, Professor RofT seeks to clarify the contents and unity of each section, its literary history, the origin of the single laws and their relation to other kindred laws in other documents of the Pentateuch.Bringing together different methods of biblical study - traditional Jewish interpretation, classical biblical criticism, form criticism, history of tradition and textual criticism - the author argues that the roots of Deuteronomy lie in monarchial Israel and Judah, that the literary climax belongs to the seventh century BCE, and that the final stages of the text are exilic and early post-exilic.

The Book of Deuteronomy

This specific method of dating is known from both biblical and Near Eastern sources . ... Moses is thus a man under orders ; the demand for obedience is a prominent theme throughout Deuteronomy , and in declaring that demand , Moses was ...

The Book of Deuteronomy

Craigie's study on the Book of Deuteronomy is part of The New International Commentary on the Old Testament. Like its companion series on the New Testament, this commentary devotes considerable care to achieving a balance between technical information and homiletic-devotional interpretation.

Festive Meals in Ancient Israel

Deuteronomy's Identity Politics in Their Ancient Near Eastern Context Peter Altmann ... on text-internal methods for dating: ”So there is nothing for it but to date Deuteronomy according to the criterion given by the basic text itself, ...

Festive Meals in Ancient Israel

This study investigates the festive meals in Deuteronomy’s laws in comparison to depictions of meals in other biblical texts, as well as ancient Near Eastern texts and iconography. Its eclectic, interdisciplinary approach includes discussion of the archaeology of meals in the ancient Levant and recent anthropological findings on meals in order to emphasize the centrality of meals for identity formation as well as for political and religious rhetoric in the texts of Deuteronomy.

A Book of Jeremiah

R. H. Kennett , “ The Date of Deuteronomy , ” JTS 7 ( 1906 ) , pp . 481–500 ; J. N. Schofield , “ The Significance of the Prophets for Dating Deuteronomy " in Studies in History and Religion , ed . E. A. Payne ( London , 1942 ) , pp .

A Book of Jeremiah

Thompson's study on the Book of Jeremiah is part of The New International Commentary on the Old Testament. Like its companion series on the New Testament, this commentary devotes considerable care to achieving a balance between technical information and homiletic-devotional interpretation.

Dating the Old Testament

These features favor a historical account rather than a historical novel with a message, and are mildly supportive of an early date. The sandal handover in 4:7 is clearly related to the levirate marriage law in Deuteronomy 25.

Dating the Old Testament

Dating the Old Testament addresses the subject of when the books of the Bible were written. It explains why the books of Genesis through Deuteronomy are a literary unity, and how the Egyptian background for these books support a date of writing during the exodus generation. It provides a detailed critique of the Documentary Hypothesis, the theory that Genesis through Joshua were created from four different sources usually labelled J, E, D, and P. It provides extensive evidence that all of Isaiah was written by Isaiah himself, and shows why Isaiah may have had a role in the collection and publication of other Old Testament books. It describes why the book of Daniel should be considered a product of the early Persian era and not the much later Maccabean period. The book contains a discussion of how the Hebrew language changed during the Old Testament era, and how this can be used to help date the books of the Old Testament.

Deuteronomy and the Meaning of Monotheism

Dating of the Song As a result of the universal recognition of the Song's independence , scholarly research has been largely concerned with questions about the date of the Song's composition and its meaning in this context.85 The dating ...

Deuteronomy and the Meaning of  Monotheism

Nathan MacDonald examines the term 'monotheism' and its appropriateness as a category for analysing the Old Testament. He traces the use of 'monotheism' since its coinage in 1660 and argues that its use in Old Testament scholarship frequently reflects a narrowed, intellectualistic conception of religion."Finally, MacDonald's volume is a valuable contribution to the discussion because it is also a fine example of biblical theology, a truly insightful exposition of some of the significant themes in the book of Deuteronomy, accompanied by a fine, detailed exposition of crucial passages in the book. [...] This book is highly recommended for all who are interested in the debate concerning biblical monotheism and the larger study of Israel's religious identity."Robert Gnuse in Biblica, Vol. 86 (2005), No. 4, 558-560"This is one of the most significant and exciting books of biblical theology I have read for some time, illustrating how the Bible can come to life when critical attention is paid to the contemporary context of its interpretation."Philip Jenson in Themelios, Vol. 29 (2004), No. 2, 56-57

Linguistic Dating of Biblical Texts

In short, Poizin«s expertise in the linguistic chronology of BH does not sway him from dating Deuteronomy¥Kings, written in EBH, to the exilic period. We stated above that transitional BH is considered by some scholars to be ...

Linguistic Dating of Biblical Texts

First Published in 2014. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an Informa company.

Ritual in Deuteronomy

Regardless of the date of the final literary form of Deuteronomy, the connection between Deut 27 and 28 makes the most sense in the sociohistorical context of the late Iron Age. Among the ritual instructions for the covenant enactment ...

Ritual in Deuteronomy

Ritual in Deuteronomy explores the symbolic world of Deuteronomy’s ritual covenant and curses through a lens of religious studies and anthropology, drawing on previously unexamined Mesopotamian material. This book focuses on the ritual material in Deuteronomy including commands regarding sacrifice, prayer objects, and especially the dramatic ritual enactment of the covenant including curses. The book’s most unique feature is an entirely new comparative study of Deut 27–30 with two ritual texts from Mesopotamia. No studies to date have undertaken a comparison of Deut 27–30 with ancient Near Eastern ritual texts outside of the treaty oath tradition. This fresh comparison illuminates how the ritual life of ancient Israel shaped the literary form of Deuteronomy and concludes that the performance of oaths was a social strategy, addressing contemporary anxieties and reinforcing systems of cultural power. This book offers a fascinating comparative study which will be of interest to undergraduate and graduate students in biblical studies, classical Hebrew, theology, and ancient Near Eastern studies. The book’s more technical aspects will also appeal to scholars of the Pentateuch, Deuteronomy, Biblical Law, Ancient Near Eastern History, Mesopotamian Studies, and Classics.

Deuteronomy and the Emergence of Textual Authority in Jeremiah

Otto's second argument for Deut 4 : 29's allusion to Jer 29 : 13–14aa rests on his identification of a contrast between the Deuteronomistic ... Ideas do not develop in such a linear fashion as to allow this method of relative dating .

Deuteronomy and the Emergence of Textual Authority in Jeremiah

Was there a shift in the perspective on Deuteronomy's authority in Jeremiah? Nathan Mastnjak analyzes the various ways that the book of Jeremiah interpreted Deuteronomy. By examining the nature of literary allusion and textual authority, he traces a development in the perspective on Deuteronomy from the earliest traditions in Jeremiah to the latest. - back of book.