Death Image Memory

This doesn't, of course, mean that graphic images of death, injury and suffering were or are absent from the papers and television screens. Indeed, they were and are present and powerfully so. As mentioned in the previous chapter, ...

Death  Image  Memory

This book explores how photography and documentary film have participated in the representation of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda and its aftermath. This in-depth analysis of professional and amateur photography and the work of Rwandan and international filmmakers offers an insight into not only the unique ability of images to engage with death, memory and the need for evidence, but also their helplessness and inadequacy when confronted with the enormity of the event. Focusing on a range of films and photographs, the book tests notions of truth, evidence, record and witnessing – so often associated with documentary practice – in the specific context of Rwanda and the wider representational framework of African conflict and suffering. Death, Image, Memory is an inquiry into the multiple memorial and evidentiary functions of images that transcends the usual investigations into whether photography and documentary film can reliably attest to the occurrence and truth of an event.

Death Memory and Material Culture

Death: Making. Memories. from. Body. to. Image. Paintings, sculpture, clothing, and burial apparatus were integral to early modern English death rituals and were part of a rich and varied visual culture of death (see Llewellyn 1991).

Death  Memory and Material Culture

- How do the living maintain ongoing relationships with the dead in Western societies? - How have the residual belongings of the dead been used to evoke memories? - Why has the body and its material environment remained so important in memory-making? Objects, images, practices, and places remind us of the deaths of others and of our own mortality. At the time of death, embodied persons disappear from view, their relationships with others come under threat and their influence may cease. Emotionally, socially, politically, much is at stake at the time of death. In this context, memories and memory-making can be highly charged, and often provide the dead with a social presence amongst the living. Memories of the dead are a bulwark against the terror of forgetting, as well as an inescapable outcome of a life's ending. Objects in attics, gardens, museums, streets and cemeteries can tell us much about the processes of remembering. This unusual and absorbing book develops perspectives in anthropology and cultural history to reveal the importance of material objects in experiences of grief, mourning and memorializing. Far from being ‘invisible', the authors show how past generations, dead friends and lovers remain manifest - through well-worn garments, letters, photographs, flowers, residual drops of perfume, funerary sculpture. Tracing the rituals, gestures and materials that have been used to shape and preserve memories of personal loss, Hallam and Hockey show how material culture provides the deceased with a powerful presence within the here and now.

Death and Memory in Early Medieval Britain

as H ̈arke suggests, or as indicators of familial divisions, the evidence does suggest that groups with different social/biological relationships had a different treatment in death. Image production in weapon-burials So far we have ...

Death and Memory in Early Medieval Britain

How were the dead remembered in early medieval Britain? Originally published in 2006, this innovative study demonstrates how perceptions of the past and the dead, and hence social identities, were constructed through mortuary practices and commemoration between c. 400–1100 AD. Drawing on archaeological evidence from across Britain, including archaeological discoveries, Howard Williams presents a fresh interpretation of the significance of portable artefacts, the body, structures, monuments and landscapes in early medieval mortuary practices. He argues that materials and spaces were used in ritual performances that served as 'technologies of remembrance', practices that created shared 'social' memories intended to link past, present and future. Through the deployment of material culture, early medieval societies were therefore selectively remembering and forgetting their ancestors and their history. Throwing light on an important aspect of medieval society, this book is essential reading for archaeologists and historians with an interest in the early medieval period.

Dangerous Memory in Nagasaki

The most prominent aspect of the atomic bomb experience which remains with him is these multiple images of death seared in his memory including the piles of dead bodies.33 The images of martyred bodies haunted the Christians in earlier ...

Dangerous Memory in Nagasaki

On 9th August 1945, the US dropped the second atomic bomb on Nagasaki. Of the dead, approximately 8500 were Catholic Christians, representing over sixty percent of the community. In this collective biography, nine Catholic survivors share personal and compelling stories about the aftermath of the bomb and their lives since that day. Examining the Catholic community’s interpretation of the A-bomb, this book not only uses memory to provide a greater understanding of the destruction of the bombing, but also links it to the past experiences of religious persecution, drawing comparisons with the ‘Secret Christian’ groups which survived in the Japanese countryside after the banning of Christianity. Through in-depth interviews, it emerges that the memory of the atomic bomb is viewed through the lens of a community which had experienced suffering and marginalisation for more than 400 years. Furthermore, it argues that their dangerous memory confronts Euro-American-centric narratives of the atomic bombings, whilst also challenging assumptions around a providential bomb. Dangerous Memory in Nagasaki presents the voices of Catholics, many of whom have not spoken of their losses within the framework of their faith before. As such, it will be invaluable to students and scholars of Japanese history, religion and war history.

Memory and Autobiography

So, in the first excerpt quoted here, the irruption of memory carries with it the dazzling certainty of death. The temporality of the image as loss, the subtle slippage of time – from which comes the strong emotional impact of ...

Memory and Autobiography

This book by one of Latin America’s leading cultural theorists examines the place of the subject and the role of biographical and autobiographical genres in contemporary culture. Arfuch argues that the on-going proliferation of private and intimate stories – what she calls the ‘biographical space’ – can be seen as symptomatic of the impersonalizing dynamics of contemporary times. Autobiographical genres, however, harbour an intersubjective dimension. The ‘I’ who speaks wants to be heard by another, and the other who listens discovers in autobiography possible points of identification. Autobiographical genres, including those that border on fiction, therefore become spaces in which the singularity of experience opens onto the collective and its historicity in ways that allow us to reflect on the ethical, political, and aesthetic dimensions not only of self-representation but also of life itself. Opening up debate through juxtaposition and dialogue, Arfuch’s own poetic writing moves freely from the Holocaust to Argentina’s last dictatorship and its traumatic memories, and then to the troubled borderlands between Mexico and the United States to show how artists rescue shards of memory that would otherwise be relegated to the dustbin of history. In so doing, she makes us see not only how challenging it is to represent past traumas and violence but also how vitally necessary it is to do so as a political strategy for combating the tides of forgetting and for finding ways of being in common.

The Book of Memory

image , ” in Gardner's phrase ( we recall the scholastic aphorism , " veritas est adaequatio rei et verbi ” ) ... 964 The memory that is immortal is what he calls “ intellectual memory , ” since the intellect does survive death .

The Book of Memory

New insights into the role of memory in the medieval world are revealed in this wide-ranging study that draws on a range of examples from Dante, Chaucer, & Aquinas to the symbolism of illuminated manuscripts.

Constructions of Death Mourning and Memory Conference October 27 29 2006

Morley , John . Death , Heaven and the Victorians . Pittsburgh : University of Pittsburgh Press , 1971 . Becoming Traffic : The Ghost Bike as a Recollection Image Debra Levine , New York University Leaps . " In any case , the Bergsonian ...

Constructions of Death  Mourning  and Memory Conference  October 27 29  2006


Forming Humanity

... with an uncorrupt intellect, perfect memory, upright will, good conscience, and strength and perfection of body, free of lust, possessing true knowledge of God and not being subject to death.83 With the loss of the image, memory, ...

Forming Humanity

Kant's proclamation of humankind's emergence from "self-incurred immaturity" left his contemporaries with a puzzle: What models should we use to sculpt ourselves if we no longer look to divine grace or received authorities? Deftly uncovering the roots of this question in Rhineland mysticism, Pietist introspection, and the rise of the bildungsroman, Jennifer A. Herdt reveals bildung, or ethical formation, as the key to post-Kantian thought. This was no simple process of secularization, in which human beings took responsibility for something they had earlier left in the hands of God. Rather, theorists of bildung, from Herder through Goethe to Hegel, championed human agency in self-determination while working out the social and political implications of our creation in the image of God. While bildung was invoked to justify racism and colonialism by stigmatizing those deemed resistant to self-cultivation, it also nourished ideals of dialogical encounter and mutual recognition. Herdt reveals how the project of forming humanity lives on in our ongoing efforts to grapple with this complicated legacy.

Losing the Dead

I think this image constitutes my first real memory. For a long time, I didn't know what it referred to. It was simply there – the bed so very high, the unmoving creased face floating in lofty whiteness, unattached to a body.

Losing the Dead

As her mother slipped into the darkness of old age, Lisa Appignanesi began to realise how little she knew of the reality behind the tales she had heard since childhood. She had shunned her parents' stories of war-time Poland, but now she set out to find the truth. In her quest she flew to Warsaw - imagining and revisiting a past she never knew. This is the moving story of the Jews who survived outside the camps, but it is also the author's own voyage of self-discovery - a family memoir of the rites of passage of emigration, childhood, and growing up an outsider in a closed community

Social Media Images and Conflicts

Critical memory is connected to the embodied experience of African Americans not only through the visceral act of witnessing physical struggle and death, but also through re-enactments and collective memory produced through expressive ...

Social Media Images and Conflicts

This collection considers how digital images and social media reconfigure the way conflicts are played out, represented and perceived around the globe. Devoted to developing original theoretical frameworks and empirical insights, the volume addresses the role of user images and social media in relation to urgent subjects such as public opinion and emotion, solidarity, evidence and verification, censorship and fake news, which are all central to the ways current conflicts are represented and unfold. Essays include a unique range of case studies from different regional and political contexts (Middle East, Europe, Asia, North America) and in connection with different conflict types (war, terror, riots, everyday resistance, etc.). They also consider performative genres such as memes, selfies and appropriations as well as images conforming to the realism and authenticity of conventional photojournalism. In this way, the collection responds to the challenges of swiftly evolving image genres as well as to the continually shifting policies and algorithms of commercial digital platforms. Together, the essays offer innovative theories and exemplary case studies as a resource for teaching and research in media, journalism and communication programmes. It is also relevant to students, teachers and researchers within sociology, political science, anthropology and related fields.

Sociological Abstracts

collective memory shaping , historical preservation role ; illustrative examples ; GB , US ; 9700291 collective memory ... collective national memory erasure ; 9718407 death images , physical / symbolic meanings , death care industry ...

Sociological Abstracts


Images in Mind

visible symbol for the new persona assumed by the dead , " and most emphatically for that part of his new persona that existed in the world of the living , that is , his memory . " 31 Following the lead of the monument that physically ...

Images in Mind

In archaic and classical Greece, statues played a constant role in people's religious, political, economic, aesthetic, and mental lives. Evidence of many kinds demonstrates that ancient Greeks thought about--and interacted with--statues in ways very different from our own. This book recovers ancient thinking about statues by approaching them through contemporary literary sources. It not only shows that ancient viewers conceived of images as more operative than aesthetic, but additionally reveals how poets and philosophers found in sculpture a practice ''good to think with.'' Deborah Tarn Steiner considers how Greek authors used images to ponder the relation of a copy to an original and of external appearance to inner reality. For these writers, a sculpture could straddle life and death, encode desire, or occasion reflection on their own act of producing a text. Many of the same sources also reveal how thinking about statues was reflected in the objects' everyday treatment. Viewing representations of gods and heroes as vessels hosting a living force, worshippers ritually washed, clothed, and fed them in order to elicit the numinous presence within. By reading the plastic and verbal sources together, this book offers new insights into classical texts while illuminating the practices surrounding the design, manufacture, and deployment of ancient images. Its argument that images are properly objects of cultural and social--rather than purely aesthetic--study will attract art historians, cultural historians, and anthropologists, as well as classicists.

Monstrous Imaginaries

... of death and inaction in Hellboy, that is paramount. The depiction of memories in The Crow, their fading in and out of reality, plays with the notion that what is captured in an image is already part of the past, a ghost as it were.

Monstrous Imaginaries

Monsters seem inevitably linked to humans and not always as mere opposites. Maaheen Ahmed examines good monsters in comics to show how Romantic themes from the eighteenth and the nineteenth centuries persist in today’s popular culture. Comics monsters, questioning the distinction between human and monster, self and other, are valuable conduits of Romantic inclinations. Engaging with Romanticism and the many monsters created by Romantic writers and artists such as Mary Shelley, Victor Hugo, and Goya, Ahmed maps the heritage, functions, and effects of monsters in contemporary comics and graphic novels. She highlights the persistence of recurrent Romantic features through monstrous protagonists in English- and French-language comics and draws out their implications. Aspects covered include the dark Romantic predilection for ruins and the sordid, the solitary protagonist and his quest, nostalgia, the prominence of the spectacle as well as excessive emotions, and above all, the monster’s ambiguity and rebelliousness. Ahmed highlights each Romantic theme through close readings of well-known but often overlooked comics, including Enki Bilal's Monstre tetralogy, Jim O'Barr's The Crow, and Emil Ferris’s My Favorite Thing Is Monsters, as well as the iconic comics series Alan Moore's Swamp Thing and Mike Mignola's Hellboy. In blurring the otherness of the monster, these protagonists retain the exaggeration and uncontrollability of all monsters while incorporating Romantic characteristics.

Charles Dickens and the Image of Women

Significantly, the death images occur in the old decayed brewery, itself symbolizing the decay of good husbandry, ... to me as a brilliant and beautiful woman might, "that I have no heart — if that has anything to do with my memory.

Charles Dickens and the Image of Women

How successful is Dickens in his portrayal of women? Dickens has been represented (along with William Blake and D.H. Lawrence) as one who championed the life of the emotions often associated with the "feminine." Yet some of his most important heroines are totally submissive and docile. Dickens, of course, had to accept the conventions of his time. It is obvious, argues Holbrook, that Dickens idealized the father-daughter relationship, and indeed, any such relationship that was unsexual, like that of Tom Pinch and his sister—but why? Why, for example, is the image of woman so often associated with death, as in Great Expectations? Dickens's own struggles over relationships with women have been documented, but much less has been said about the unconscious elements behind these problems. Using recent developements in psychoanalytic object-relations theory, David Holbrook offers new insight into the way in which the novels of Dickens—particularly Bleak House, Little Dorrit, and Great Expectations—both uphold emotional needs and at the same time represent the limits of his view of women and that of his time.

Performing Memories

The work done by WardĊszkiewicz in Hear My Cry is an astounding attempt to save the memory of an event through montage ... the history of Ryszard Siwiec, history extracted from the seven seconds of footage that remained after his death.

Performing Memories

What is memory today? How can it be approached? Why does the contemporary world seem to be more and more haunted by different types of memories still asking for elaboration? Which artistic experiences have explored and defined memory in meaningful ways? How do technologies and the media have changed it? These are just some of the questions developed in this collection of essays analysing memory and memory shapes, which explores the different ways in which past time and its elaboration have been, and still are, elaborated, discussed, written or filmed, and contested, but also shared. By gathering together scholars from different fields of investigation, this book explores the cultural, social and artistic tensions in representing the past and the present, in understanding our legacies, and in approaching historical time and experience. Through the analysis of different representations of memory, and the investigation of literature, anthropology, myth and storytelling, a space of theories and discourses about the symbolic and cultural spaces of memory representation is developed.

Proceedings of the Natural Science Association of Staten Island

Sacred to the memory of Jacob Burbanck, who died Sept. 14, 1854, AE 83 y'rs, 5 mo's & 5 d's No terror has death or the grave To those who believe in the Lord, Who know the Redeemer can save; And lean on the faith of his word.

Proceedings of the Natural Science Association of Staten Island


Between Image and Identity

In Nietzschean terms, shadows projected on caves linger in the collective unconscious long after an ideology is unfounded, and constitute a site of archaic memory. Djebar's cave-shadows also symbolize the inevitable death that ...

Between Image and Identity

This book addresses the 'autobiographical' literature, visual, and performance art of postcolonial women from Maghreb and Southeast Asia including Leila Sebbar, Assia Djebar, and Theresa Hak Kyung Cha. Karina Eileraas critically examines how contemporary postcolonial artists participate in the violence of representation in order to re-imagine the relationship between image and identity.

A Treasury of English Sonnets

Drummond , who as usual may have had a verse of Sir Philip's in his memory ( Arcadia , Lib . 3 , p . 260 , ed . 1598 ) : ' A dull desire to kisse the image of our death , ' repeats the expression ( Poems , 1616 , sig .

A Treasury of English Sonnets


Skin Meaning and Symbolism in Pet Memorials

... established is a link in the metamorphosis between image, memory, and narrative creation. Where once we held, carried, or wore an image or death memento upon the body as a tangible link to the intangible, we now wear it within us.

Skin  Meaning  and Symbolism in Pet Memorials

This book looks at changes to the ways Western culture memorialises the dead. Specifically, it considers the changing relationship between people and domestic animals. Rather than focusing on how these bonds have changed in day to day life, it examines these relationships by considering how, after death, these animals are remembered.

Rhetorical Agendas

Although Beckwith was responsible for the death of Evers, he was not solely responsible for the injustices done to ... (Thomas A01).2 Images of violence against African Americans were not relegated to memories of the 1960s either.

Rhetorical Agendas

This edited collection offers a broad consideration of contemporary rhetorical scholarship, tied to political, ethical, and spiritual themes. Originating from the 2004 conference of the Rhetoric Society of America, the contents of this volume reflects the conference themes of rhetorical agendas in current theory and research. The volume starts off with transcripts of the talks presented by the conference's featured speakers. The essays that follow are organized around five key topics: history, theory, pedagogy, publics, and gender. These chapters address subjects ranging from religious identity to civil rights; from weapons of mass destruction to literacy testing and electronic texts, reflecting the wide array of areas under study across the rhetoric discipline. With contributions from well-known scholars as well as newcomers, the breadth and diversity of this collection make a significant contribution to rhetorical scholarship, and will stimulate additional work. As such, the volume will be of interest to scholars and students in rhetoric studies in speech communication, English, and related disciplines.