Death March

Death March

This practical handbook on software project success and survival explains how to confront five important issues involved in all software projects--people, politics, process, project management, and tools.

Bataan Death March

A Survivor's Account

Bataan Death March

The hopeless yet determined resistance of American and Filipino forces against the Japanese invasion has made Bataan and Corregidor symbols of pride, but Bataan has a notorious darker side. After the U.S.-Filipino remnants surrendered to a far stronger force, they unwittingly placed themselves at the mercy of a foe who considered itself unimpaired by the Geneva Convention. The already ill and hungry survivors, including many wounded, were forced to march at gunpoint many miles to a harsh and oppressive POW c& many were murdered or died on the way in a nightmare of wanton cruelty that has made the term "Death March" synonymous with the Bataan peninsula. Among the prisoners was army pilot William E. Dyess. With a few others, Dyess escaped from his POW camp and was among the very first to bring reports of the horrors back to a shocked United States. His story galvanized the nation and remains one of the most powerful personal narratives of American fighting men. Stanley L. Falk provides a scene-setting introduction for this Bison Books edition. William E. Dyess was born in Albany, Texas. As a young army air forces pilot he was shipped to Manila in the spring of 1941. Shortly after his escape and return to the United States, Colonel Dyess was killed while testing a new airplane. He did not survive long enough to learn that he had been awarded a Congressional Medal of Honor.

The Bataan Death March

World War II Prisoners in the Pacific

The Bataan Death March

Describes the forced march of 70,000 Filipino and American prisoners of war captured by the Japanese in the Philippines during World War II.

Bataan Death March

A Soldier's Story

Bataan Death March


Death March Escape

The Remarkable Story of a Man Who Twice Escaped the Nazi Holocaust

Death March Escape

In June 1944, the Nazis locked eighteen-year-old Dave Hersch into a railroad boxcar and shipped him from his hometown of Dej, Hungary, to Mauthausen Concentration Camp, the harshest, cruellest camp in the Reich. After ten months in the granite mines of Mauthausens nearby sub-camp, Gusen, he weighed less than 80lbs, nothing but skin and bones.Somehow surviving the relentless horrors of these two brutal camps, as Allied forces drew near Dave was forced to join a death march to Gunskirchen Concentration Camp, over thirty miles away. Soon after the start of the march, and more dead than alive, Dave summoned a burst of energy he did not know he had and escaped. Quickly recaptured, he managed to avoid being killed by the guards. Put on another death march a few days later, he achieved the impossible: he escaped again.Dave often told his story of survival and escape, and his son, Jack, thought he knew it well. But years after his fathers death, he came across a photograph of his father on, of all places, the Mauthausen Memorials website. It was an image he had never seen before and it propelled him on an intensely personal journey of discovery.Using only his fathers words for guidance, Jack takes us along as he flies to Europe to learn the secrets behind the photograph, secrets his father never told of his time in the camps. Beginning in the verdant hills of his fathers Hungarian hometown, we travel with Jack to the foreboding rock mines of Mauthausen and Gusen concentration camps, to the dust-choked roads and intersections of the death marches, and, finally, to the makeshift hiding places of his fathers rescuers. We accompany Jacks every step as he describes the unimaginable: what his father must have seen and felt while struggling to survive in the most abominable places on earth.In a warm and emotionally engaging story, Jack digs deeply into both his fathers life and his own, revisiting and reflecting on his fathers time at the hands of the Nazis during the last year of the Second World War, when more than mere survival was at stake the fate of humanity itself hung in the balance.

Death March

Bomb Squad NYC: Incident 2

Death March

A tip from the CIA puts all New York law enforcement on high alert just days before the city’s Thanksgiving Day parade. Then, mysteriously, small bombs begin exploding around the Five Boroughs, stretching the NYPD Bomb Squad thin—just when the main terrorist threat promises a scale of death and destruction beyond anything New York has ever seen. A day before the parade, Sergeant Sandy Kahn races to meet a tipster in Queens—the girlfriend of a man who left ominous clues before going missing. Is he the bomber? The decoy? A dead end? With the rest of his squad fully deployed along the two-and-a-half-mile parade route, Kahn, the ultimate team player, has to go solo. Racing against the clock, he uncovers a plot of diabolical simplicity and stunning destructive potential. But millions already line the streets of Manhattan, the first marching bands have reached the VIP viewing stand, and floats are bouncing down the avenue. Can Kahn stop the plotters before the world’s most famous parade turns into a scene of cataclysmic slaughter?

Death March

The Stonetellers, Volume Two

Death March

Jean Rabe's long-anticipated return to Krynn continues! Escaping from the slave pens of a Dark Knight mining camp was no easy feat, but what awaits Direfang, a former hobgoblin slave who has become the reluctant general of a growing goblin army is every bit as perilous. From the cruel ogre mountains to the shores of Newsea, Direfang, Mudwort the shaman, and the Dark Knight wizard Grallik fight the natural and unnatural forces that seek to destroy them. Direfang is tested to his limits by once-friends and powerful foes as he undertakes a death march to the Qualinesti Forest. His eyes on independence, Direfang refuses to surrender, and pledges his life for a chance to be free, even as he learns that freedom is a deadly prize.

Before the Death March

Before the Death March

Before the Death March is the sequel to Intervention by Michael Widmer. The GT Intervention Team entrusted by the president and vice president to stop mass shootings is back, and now their focus will experience an increase in the types of mass killers they will be facing. The information being gathered by the government has reached epic proportions, and the long-term focus continues to be the justification leaders use to continue the monitoring of “prospects” in an effort to stop the mass killings that plague the country. Who is safe from the invasion of personal privacy? And what will be the long-term solution? The story contains fictional characters from Intervention taking on the killers picked by the system. As the system grows, the number of teams increases as well. Though the cases are fictional, the type of crimes they address threatens all of us in real life, crimes that fade with the intervals in between incidents. At the end of the story, the author discusses solutions and the need to address more than just gun control, mental health, and lengthy investigations into why.

Inside the Bataan Death March

Defeat, Travail and Memory

Inside the Bataan Death March

For two weeks during the spring of 1942, the Bataan Death March—one of the most widely condemned atrocities of World War II—unfolded. The prevailing interpretation of this event is simple: American prisoners of war suffered cruel treatment at the hands of their Japanese captors while Filipinos, sympathetic to the Americans, looked on. Most survivors of the march wrote about their experiences decades after the war and a number of factors distorted their accounts. The crucial aspect of memory is central to this study—how it is constructed, by whom and for what purpose. This book questions the prevailing interpretation, reconsiders the actions of all three groups in their cultural contexts and suggests a far greater complexity. Among the conclusions is that violence on the march was largely the result of a clash of cultures—undisciplined, individualistic Americans encountered Japanese who valued order and form, while Filipinos were active, even ambitious, participants in the drama.