Defoe s Fiction

Unfortunately, it is extremely difficult to reconstruct Defoe's audience, or to make anything other than guesses about its expectations of reading. It seems obvious that Defoe's fiction has to be seen as Modern, popular fiction, ...

Defoe s Fiction

First published in 1985, Defoe’s Fiction explores Defoe’s work by considering it in the context of its genre. The book highlights the difficulty of placing Defoe’s fiction in the most appropriate context due to it being aimed primarily at a popular market, in contrast to the more literary productions of Pope, Swift, or Addison. It also comments on the trend of focusing on Defoe’s irony or emphasising his mimetic power. In doing so, it seeks to explain, rather than judge, Defoe’s achievement by looking at his whole body of work in the context of its genre. Defoe’s Fiction will appeal to those with an interest in Defoe, comparative literature, and the history of literary criticism.

Defoe s Major Fiction

vehicles through which Defoe can explore the threat of the “other” that is particularly acute throughout Robinson ... And indeed this is where occlusions and erasures often occur in Defoe's fictional accounts, as Defoe's characters ...

Defoe   s Major Fiction

This book argues that recent materialist approaches to Defoe are insufficiently attentive to the dominant preoccupations of his fictional oeuvre, which center on moral accountability and self-definition, and addresses Defoe’s characters, narration, aesthetic, and ethical experiments that constitute his innovative achievements in the novel form.

Positioning Daniel Defoe s Non Fiction

Defoe's vertiginous appropriation and discrediting of several forms—epistolary manual, practical instructor, and fictional narration—reflects the way in which the CET plays with paradigms of self-understanding, encouraging a new ...

Positioning Daniel Defoe   s Non Fiction

This volume analyses the form, structure and genre of a selection of non-fictional works by Daniel Defoe. Directing our scholarly gaze away from the much studied novels, the essays explore the rhetorical strategies and generic inventiveness on display in Defoe’s better known non-fictional texts, such as The Shortest Way with the Dissenters and A Tour through the Whole Island of Great Britain, and some of his lesser known publications, such as his Complete English Tradesman and An Essay on the History and Reality of Apparitions. What emerges from the collection is the picture of an author who responded to early eighteenth-century debates and events with outstanding authorial skill and energy, and to whom matters of form and style were of great importance.

Defoe and Fictional Time

... 113, 114, 127—29; and absence of chapters in Defoe's fiction, 114— 15; used to define the reader's expectations, 117; of narrative "future, 120—21; and Defoe's style, 122; and rhythms of similar events in Defoe's fiction, 123; ...

Defoe and Fictional Time

Defoe and Fictional Time shows Defoe's relevance to issues now central to criticism of the novel; relationships between narrative time and clock time, the influence of time concepts shared by writers and their audience, and above all the questions of how fiction shapes the phenomenal time of reading. Paul K. Alkon offers first a study of time in Defoe's fiction, with glances at Richardson, Fielding, and Sterne; and second a theoretical discussion of time in fiction. Arguing that eighteenth-century views of history account for the strange chronologies in Captain Singleton, Colonel Jack, Moll Flanders, and Roxana, Alkon explores Defoe's innovative use of narrative sequences, frequency, spatial form, chronology, settings, tempo, and the reader's cumulative memories of a text. Defoe's Journal of the Plague Year is the first portrayal of a public duration—passing time shared by an entire population during a crisis—ranking Defoe among the most creative writers who have explored the way in which fictional time may influence reading time.

The Novels of Daniel Defoe Part II

Such books were advertised alongside Defoe's Journal in the press and would have been available alongside it in the booksellers' shops.6 Any one of the first readers of Defoe's 'novel' (as we now call it) would naturally take it to be ...

The Novels of Daniel Defoe  Part II

Brings together three parts of "Robinson Crusoe" and examines their relationship. This work contains editorial material that includes a substantial introduction to each novel, explanatory endnotes, textual notes, and a consolidated index.

Realism Myth and History in Defoe s Fiction

Certainly it is a judgment that at least takes into account one important element in Defoe's fiction . But the charm in Defoe's fiction has certain magical qualities as well . Realism was one element in a tendency to build convincing ...

Realism  Myth  and History in Defoe s Fiction


Voices of the Self in Daniel Defoe s Fiction

Actually , a line of flight can serve as a criterion to distinguish between those novels that break from the earlier tradition and those that strike a close resemblance to it . Defoe's five major fictional characters , Crusoe ...

Voices of the Self in Daniel Defoe s Fiction

The alternative Marxist approach to literary criticism in the present study consists of three «vocal» modes of interpretation: the public voice, the private voice, and the homeless voice of the self. The public voice represents the authorial vision shaped by dominant ideology that covers up the «objective» real, while the private voice corresponds to the authorial conscious or unconscious insertion into radical ideology that turns the «objective» real into the ideological real. However, the homeless voice of the self may obliterate any ties with history and ideology. A representation of the Marxist «particular interest» of the self, the homeless voice echoes in the open space of the text and reaches for the distant real shaped by the reader's interpretive paradigms inside or outside the constraints of the institutional discourse. The alternative Marxist approach values both history and theory in literary criticism, as the interplay between the two may reinforce and supplement each other in their shared interpretive territory of the private voice of the self in the text, although the public voice is more oriented towards history and the homeless voice towards theory. The different voices of the self are exemplified in a critical reading of Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Captain Singleton, Moll Flanders, and Roxana. Such a study profits from both modern critical theory (reader response, postmodernism, and feminist theory, etc.) and historical insights into Defoe's fiction (religious hermeneutics, theology and medicine, and gender issues in the eighteenth century, etc.)

The Novels of Daniel Defoe Part II

In his poverty-stricken childhood and youth, as Defoe's preface has stated, Jack's 'Circumstances form'd him by Necessity ... 9 Maximillian E. Novak, 'The Problem of Necessity in Defoe's Fiction', Philological Quarterly, 40 (1961), pp.

The Novels of Daniel Defoe  Part II

Brings together three parts of "Robinson Crusoe" and examines their relationship. This work contains editorial material that includes a substantial introduction to each novel, explanatory endnotes, textual notes, and a consolidated index.

The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe

The Stoke Newington Edition Daniel Defoe Maximillian E. Novak, Irving N. Rothman, Manuel Schonhorn ... He approached Defoe's fiction in terms of a growing sense of individualism exemplified by the isolation of figures such as Robinson ...

The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe

Robinson Crusoe has been an international best-seller for three hundred years. This edition of the novel with its introduction, line notes, and full bibliographical notes provides a uniquely scholarly presentation of the novel. There has been no other edition like it.

Eighteenth Century Fiction and the Law of Property

Watt's The Rise of the Novel emphasizes Crusoe's accounting habits ( – ). Vickers argues for the influence of the new science on Defoe's prose in Robinson Crusoe in Defoe and the New Science, – .

Eighteenth Century Fiction and the Law of Property

In Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property, Wolfram Schmidgen draws on legal and economic writings to analyse the description of houses, landscapes, and commodities in eighteenth-century fiction. His study argues that such descriptions are important to the British imagination of community. By making visible what it means to own something, they illuminate how competing concepts of property define the boundaries of the individual, of social community, and of political systems. In this way, Schmidgen recovers description as a major feature of eighteenth-century prose, and he makes his case across a wide range of authors, including Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, William Blackstone, Adam Smith, and Ann Radcliffe. The book's most incisive theoretical contribution lies in its careful insistence on the unity of the human and the material: in Schmidgen's argument, persons and things are inescapably entangled. This approach produces fresh insights into the relationship between law, literature, and economics.

Daniel Defoe

Upholding the insights of Ioyce and Woolf, this study argues that Defoe intuitively grasped the recursive and ... The textual richness of Defoe's fiction obliges readers to appreciate the tensions between and in experience and fantasy.

Daniel Defoe

A highly conscious wordsmith, Daniel Defoe used expository styles in his fiction and non-fiction that reflected his ability to perceive material and intellectual phenomena from opposing, but not contradictory perspectives. Moreover, the boundaries of genre within his wide-ranging oeuvre can prove highly fluid. In this study, Robert James Merrett approaches Defoe's body of work using interdisciplinary methods that recognize dialectic in his verbal creativity and cognitive awareness. Examining more than ninety of Defoe's works, Merrett contends that this author's literariness exploits a conscious dialogue that fosters the reciprocity of traditional and progressive authorial procedures. Along the way, he discusses Defoe's lexical and semantic sensibility, his rhetorical and aesthetic theories, his contrarian theology, and more. Merrett proposes that Defoe's contrarian outlook celebrates a view of consciousness that acknowledges the brain's bipartite structure, and in so doing illustrates how cognitive science may be applied to further explorations of narrative art.

Encyclopedia of the Novel

KATHERINE A. ARMSTRONG See also Daniel Defoe Further Reading Armstrong, Katherine A., Defoe: Writer as Agent, Victoria, British Columbia: University of Victoria, 1996 Bell, Ian A., Defoe's Fiction, London: Croom Helm, and Totowa, ...

Encyclopedia of the Novel

First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Orphan in Eighteenth Century Fiction

Defoe, Daniel.The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders. 1722. Ed. David Blewett. London: Penguin,1989. ... Readings in theFrench and English Novel, 1733–1782. ... 'Money and characterin Defoe's fiction'.

The Orphan in Eighteenth Century Fiction

The Orphan in Eighteenth-Century Fiction explores how the figure of the orphan was shaped by changing social and historical circumstances. Analysing sixteen major novels from Defoe to Austen, this original study explains the undiminished popularity of literary orphans and reveals their key role in the construction of gendered subjectivity.

Defoe s Writings and Manliness

H. M. Parshley (Harmonds worth: Penguin, 1972) Bell, Ian, Defoe's Fiction (London and Sydney: Croom Helm, 1985) , 'King Crusoe: Locke's Political Theory in Robinson Crusoe', English Studies, 69(1988), 27-36 , 'Crusoe's Women: Or, ...

Defoe   s Writings and Manliness

Defoe's Writings and Manliness is a timely intervention in Defoe studies and in the study of masculinity in eighteenth-century literature more generally. Arguing that Defoe's writings insistently returned to the issues of manliness and its contrary, effeminacy, this book reveals how he drew upon a complex and diverse range of discourses through which masculinity was discussed in the period. It is for this reason that this book crosses over and moves between modern paradigms for the analysis of eighteenth-century masculinity to assess Defoe's men. A combination of Defoe's clarity of vision, a spirit of contrariness and a streak of moral didacticism resulted in an idiosyncratic and restless testing of the forces surrounding his period's ideas of manliness. Defoe's men are men, but they are never unproblematically so: they display a contrariness which indicates that a failure of manliness is never very far away.

Eighteenth Century Fiction and the Reinvention of Wonder

Charles Gildon's indignant response to Crusoe, titled “The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Mr. D----- De F---” (1719), presents Defoe's fiction as just this sort of “Bauble” painted up as a “Miracle.

Eighteenth Century Fiction and the Reinvention of Wonder

A footprint materializes mysteriously on a deserted shore; a giant helmet falls from the sky; a traveler awakens to find his horse dangling from a church steeple. Eighteenth-century fiction brims with moments such as these, in which the prosaic rubs up against the marvelous. While it is a truism that the period's literature is distinguished by its realism and air of probability, Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Reinvention of Wonder argues that wonder is integral to—rather than antithetical to—the developing techniques of novelistic fiction. Positioning its reader on the cusp between recognition and estrangement, between faith and doubt, modern fiction hinges upon wonder. Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Reinvention of Wonder unfolds its new account of fiction's rise through surprising readings of classic early novels—from Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe to Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey—and brings to attention lesser-known works, most notably Rudolf Raspe's Baron Munchausen's Narrative of His Marvellous Travels. In this bold new account, the eighteenth century bears witness not to the world's disenchantment but rather to wonder's relocation from the supernatural realm to the empirical world, providing a reevaluation not only of how we look back at the Enlightenment, but also of how we read today.

The English Novel in History 1700 1780

7 Ian Watt , The Rise of the Novel : Studies in Defoe , Richardson and Fielding , ( Berkeley and Los Angeles , University of California Press , 1957 ) , p . 60 . 8 Daniel Defoe , Colonel fack , ed . Samuel Holt Monk ( London , Oxford ...

The English Novel in History  1700 1780

The English Novel in History 1700-1780 provides students with specific contexts for the early novel in response to a new understanding of eigtheenth-century Britain. It traces the social and moral representations of the period in extended readings of the major novelists, as well as evaluatiing the importance of lesser known ones. John Richetti traces the shifting subject matter of the novel, discussing: * scandalous and amatory fictions * criminal narratives of the early part of the century * the more disciplined, realistic, and didactic strain that appears in the 1740's and 1750's * novels promoting new ideas about the nature of domestic life * novels by women and how they relate to the shift of subject matter This original and useful book revises traditional literary history by considering novels from those years in the context of the transformation of Britain in the eighteenth century.

Eventfulness in British Fiction

(Reprint of: Ian A. Bell: Defoe's Fiction. Totowa: Barnes & Noble 1985, 115î52), 403–36. Blewitt, David (1989). “Introduction”, in Defoe, Daniel (1989). The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders (London: Penguin Classics) ...

Eventfulness in British Fiction

An event, defined as the decisive turn, the surprising point in the plot of a narrative, constitutes its tellability, the motivation for reading it. This book describes a framework for a narratological definition of eventfulness and its dependence on the historical, socio-cultural and literary context. A series of fifteen analyses of British novels and tales, from late medieval and early modern times to the late 20th century, demonstrates how this concept can be put into practice for a new, specifically contextual interpretation of the central relevance of these texts. The examples include Chaucer’s “Miller’s Tale”, Behn’s “Oroonoko”, Defoe’s “Moll Flanders”, Richardson’s “Pamela”, Fielding’s “Tom Jones”, Dickens’s “Great Expectations”, Hardy's “On the Western Circuit”, James’s “The Beast in the Jungle”, Joyce’s “Grace”, Conrad’s “Shadow-Line”, Woolf’s “Unwritten Novel”, Lawrence’s “Fanny and Annie”, Mansfield’s “At the Bay”, Fowles’s “Enigma” and Swift’s “Last Orders”. This selection is focused on the transitional period from 19th-century realism to 20th-century modernism because during these decades traditional concepts of what counts as an event were variously problematized; therefore, these texts provide a particularly interesting field for testing the analytical capacity of the term of eventfulness.

The Life of Daniel Defoe

Alkon, Paul K. Defoe and Fictional Time. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 1979. Alter, Robert. Rogue's Progress: Studies in the Picaresque Novel. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1964. Backscheider, Paula R. A Being More ...

The Life of Daniel Defoe

The Life of Daniel Defoe examines the entire range of Defoe’s writing in the context of what is known about his life and opinions. Features extended and detailed commentaries on Defoe’s political, religious, moral, and economic journalism, as well as on all of his narrative fictions, including Robinson Crusoe Places emphasis on Defoe’s distinctive style and rhetoric Situates his work within the precise historical circumstances of the eighteenth-century in which Defoe was an important and active participant Now available in paperback

The Boundaries of Fiction

History and the Eighteenth-century British Novel Everett Zimmerman ... 14 Maximillian E. Novak , Realism , Myth , and History in Defoe's Fiction ( Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press , 1983 ) , aptly describes Defoe's as “ a fiction ...

The Boundaries of Fiction

Focusing on canonical works by Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Laurence Sterne, and others, this book explains the relationship between British fiction and historical writing when both were struggling to attain status and authority. History was at once powerful and vulnerable in the empiricist climate of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century England, suspect because of its reliance on testimony, yet essential if empiricism were ever to move beyond natural philosophy. The Boundaries of Fiction shows how, in this time of historiographical instability, the British novel exploited analogies to history. Titles incorporating the term ?history,? pseudo-editors presenting pseudo-documentary ?evidence,? and narrative theorizing about historical truth were some of the means used to distinguish novels from the fictions of poetry and other literary forms. These efforts, Everett Zimmerman maintains, amounted to a critique of history's limits and pointed to the novel's power to transcend them. He offers rich analyses of texts central to the tradition of the novel, chiefly Clarissa, Tom Jones, and Tristram Shandy, and concludes with discussions of Sir Walter Scott's development of the historical novel and David Hume's philosophy of history. Along the way, Zimmerman refers to such other important historical figures as John Locke, Richard Bentley, William Wotton, and Edward Gibbon and engages contemporary thinkers, including Paul Ricoeur and Michel Foucault, who have addressed the philosophical and methodological issues of historical evidence and narrative.

A Companion to Sensation Fiction

According to Ian Watt'sinfluential history,The Rise ofthe Novel (1957), “[Defoe's] fiction is the first whichpresents us with apicture both oftheindividual life inits larger perspective as... historical... and in its closerview ...

A Companion to Sensation Fiction

This comprehensive collection offers a complete introduction to one of the most popular literary forms of the Victorian period, its key authors and works, its major themes, and its lasting legacy. Places key authors and novels in their cultural and historical context Includes studies of major topics such as race, gender, melodrama, theatre, poetry, realism in fiction, and connections to other art forms Contributions from top international scholars approach an important literary genre from a range of perspectives Offers both a pre and post-history of the genre to situate it in the larger tradition of Victorian publishing and literature Incorporates coverage of traditional research and cutting-edge contemporary scholarship