Once and for All

The publication of this book restores a missing chapter in the history of twentieth-century American literature

Once and for All

The publication of this book restores a missing chapter in the history of twentieth-century American literature. With his New Directions debut in 1938, the twenty-five-year-old Delmore Schwartz was hailed as a genius and among the most promising writers of his generation. Yet he died in relative obscurity in 1966, wracked by mental illness and substance abuse. Sadly, his literary legacy has been overshadowed by the story of his tragic life. Among poets, Schwartz was a prototype for the confessional movement made famous by his slightly younger friends Robert Lowell and John Berryman. While his stories and novellas about Jewish American experience laid the groundwork for novels by Saul Bellow (whose Humboldt's Gift is based on Schwartz's life) and Philip Roth. Much of Schwartz's writing has been out of print for decades. This volume aims to restore Schwartz to his proper place in the canon of American literature and give new readers access to the breadth of his achievement. Included are selections from the in-print stories and poems, as well as excerpts from his long unavailable epic poem Genesis, a never-completed book-length work on T. S. Eliot, and unpublished poems from his archives.

Delmore Schwartz

Delmore Schwartz, Last & Lost Poems, ed. Robert Phillips (New York: Vanguard Press, 1979), 4. The poem is dated 1954, but it gathers preoccupations from over a decade earlier. 2. Walt Whitman, “Preface 1855—Leaves of Grass, ...

Delmore Schwartz

Taking as its starting point Delmore Schwartz's self-appointment as both a 'poet of the Hudson River' and 'laureate of the Atlantic,' this book comprehensively reassesses the poetic achievement of a critically neglected writer. Runchman reads Schwartz's poetry in relation to its national and international perspectives.

Delmore Schwartz

Grateful acknowledgment for permission to quote copyrighted material is made to New Directions for In Dreams Begin Responsibilities by Delmore Schwartz, copyright © 1938 by New Directions Publishing Corporation; Shenandoah by Delmore ...

Delmore Schwartz

Delmore Schwartz: The Life of an American Poet is based on interviews, letters, and an extraordinary collection of unpublished papers that had never before been examined. Delmore Schwartz was only twenty-four in 1938 when his first book, In Dreams Begin Responsibilities, was published. He received praise from T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Allen Tate, John Crowe Ransom, Wallace Stevens, and William Carlos Williams. For Tate, it was “the only genuine innovation we’ve had since Eliot and Pound.” A decade later, the short-story collection The World Is a Wedding was published; many critics characterized it as the definitive portrait of their generation. In this biography, the first about the man whom John Berryman called “the most underrated poet of the twentieth century,” James Atlas traces Schwartz’s history, from the arrival of his Romanian ancestors in New York, to his youth in Washington Heights, to his career at Harvard as a graduate student in philosophy, and onward to the flowering of his generation in the '40s, when he and the critics, poets, and novelists who were his friends made their reputations. Schwartz’s brilliant satires of his friends and acquaintances, his autobiographical stories, and his letters to his illustrious peers contribute to this vivid portrait of an era—and of that era’s most trenchant chronicler.

Selected Poems 1938 1958

“Every point of view, every kind of knowledge and every kind of experience is limited and ignorant: nevertheless so far as l know, this volume seems to me to be as representative as it could be.—-Delmore Schwartz

Selected Poems  1938 1958

“Every point of view, every kind of knowledge and every kind of experience is limited and ignorant: nevertheless so far as l know, this volume seems to me to be as representative as it could be.—-Delmore Schwartz

Delmore Schwartz

The book is dedicated “ To Mark Van Doren , and to the sacred memory of Delmore Schwartz . ” LOWELL , ROBERT . “ To Delmore Schwartz . ” Life Studies . New York : Farrar , Straus and Cudahy , 1959 , pp . 53–54 .

Delmore Schwartz


Letters of Delmore Schwartz

Delmore Schwartz Robert S. Phillips. There is a good story about D. H. Lawrence by K. Boyle in B.A.S.S. ( Best American Short Stories ) of 1931 . You are becoming a valuable myth in my postures before the intellectuals .

Letters of Delmore Schwartz

An intimate account of the sudden rise to literary fame and long, inexorable decline of Delmore Schwartz, a complex and deeply troubled man who was keenly aware of his own inner contradictions, as revealed by his correspondence

American and British Poetry

Delmore Schwartz : Middle Poems , " Concerning Poetry 2 ( 2 ) , Fall 1969 , 25-26 . " The self is unlike music " Lila LEE VALENTI . “ The Apprenticeship of Delmore Schwartz , " Twentieth Century Literature 20 ( 3 ) , July 1974 , 205 .

American and British Poetry


I Brake for Delmore Schwartz

" -Ivan Gold, New York Times Book Review "Here is an imaginative and engaging writer who breaks all the conventions of contemporary fiction with a certain devilish relish.

I Brake for Delmore Schwartz

"Grayson is a born storyteller and standup talker Highly recommended." -Library Journal "Grayson's stories are full on insanity, nutty therapists, cancerous relatives, broken homes, fiction workshops, youthful theatricals at Catskill bungalow colonies and the morbid wizardry of telephone answering machines." -Ivan Gold, New York Times Book Review "Here is an imaginative and engaging writer who breaks all the conventions of contemporary fiction with a certain devilish relish." -Robin Hemley, Another Chicago Magazine "Disingenuous confessions of the writer's ineptitude are suffused with the appealing confessional anxiety of a small-time writer scrabbling against odds." -Jaimy Gordon, American Book Review

Last Lost Poems

" "This posthumous collection will perhaps help to re-establish Delmore Schwartz as one of the major twentieth-century American poets." -John Ashbery "Delmore's genius survives in the sound of his words, in his hypnotizing lines.

Last   Lost Poems

With some changes in the contents-most notably the addition of sixteen recently discovered poems-Last & Lost Poems is a paperbound version of the highly praised 1979 Vanguard Press publication. That book disclosed that between 1958 and 1966, despite his disintegrating life, Delmore Schwartz was indeed working and producing poems full of the special magic that had propelled him early on into the literary limelight. Commenting on it, Richard Wilbur hailed Last & Lost Poems as "a valuable book... Schwartz sounds like no other voice in our time--rhapsodic yet philosophic; self-conscious; self-forgetting; unguarded; rejoicing or insisting on obligation to rejoice... Wonderfully free and energetic." "This posthumous collection will perhaps help to re-establish Delmore Schwartz as one of the major twentieth-century American poets." -John Ashbery "Delmore's genius survives in the sound of his words, in his hypnotizing lines." -Jonathan Galassi, The New York Review of Books "The greatest man I ever met." -Lou Reed

Voices Visions

In his criticism , as Louis Simpson has noted , Schwartz was elegant , incisive , and perceptive until the end . Reading The Selected Essays of Delmore Schwartz ( 1970 ) , however , does suggest reasons other than ...

Voices   Visions

A selection of essays and reviews published over the past twenty-five years in the Berkshire Eagle, Chicago Review, the Chicago Tribune, Magill's Literary Annual, The World & I, and other journals and collections, Voices and Visions offers engaging discussions of a wide range of modern and contemporary American and European writers.

Letters of Delmore Schwartz

An intimate account of the sudden rise to literary fame and long, inexorable decline of Delmore Schwartz, a complex and deeply troubled man who was keenly aware of his own inner contradictions, as revealed by his correspondence

Letters of Delmore Schwartz

An intimate account of the sudden rise to literary fame and long, inexorable decline of Delmore Schwartz, a complex and deeply troubled man who was keenly aware of his own inner contradictions, as revealed by his correspondence

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

Successful Love and Other Stories (1961) Selected Essays of Delmore Schwartz (1970; edited by Donald Dike and David Zucker) In Dreams Begin Responsibilities and Other Stories (1978) “I Am Cherry Alive, ” the Little Girl Sang (1979) Last ...

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

Alphabetically arranged entries include discussions of individual authors, literary movements, institutions, notable texts, literary developments, themes, ethnic literatures, and "topic" essays.

Lionel Trilling and the Critics

33 Delmore Schwartz Excerpt from “ The Duchess ' Red Shoes , ” Partisan Review January - February 1953 Delmore Schwartz ( 1913–66 ) was a poet and short - story writer . His celebrated short story , “ In Dreams Begin Responsibilities ...

Lionel Trilling and the Critics

Lionel Trilling and the Critics provides a comprehensive portrait of Lionel Trilling, perhaps the most influential American cultural critic of the twentieth century. The contributors are a who?s who of Anglo-American intellectuals from the 1930s through the 1970s. They include Edmund Wilson, Robert Penn Warren, F. R. Leavis, Leslie Fiedler, R. W. B. Lewis, R. P. Blackmur, Irving Howe, Irving Kristol, Raymond Williams, Norman Podhoretz, Gertrude Himmelfarb, William Barrett, Bruno Bettelheim, Gerald Graff, and Cornel West.

The Wounded Surgeon Confession and Transformation in Six American Poets The Poetry of Lowell Bishop Berryman Jarrell Schwartz and Plath

DELMORE SCHWARTZ Selected Poems: Summer Knowledge by Delmore Schwartz (New Directions, 1967) Genesis: Book One by Delmore Schwartz (New Directions, 1943) Shenandoah and Other Verse Plays by Delmore Schwartz, edited by Robert Phillips ...

The Wounded Surgeon  Confession and Transformation in Six American Poets  The Poetry of Lowell  Bishop  Berryman  Jarrell  Schwartz  and Plath

"One of the most promising young poet-critics in America" (Los Angeles Times) examines a revolutionary generation of poets. Robert Lowell, Elizabeth Bishop, Sylvia Plath, John Berryman, Randall Jarrell, and Delmore Schwartz formed one of the great constellations of talent in American literature. In the decades after World War II, they changed American poetry forever by putting themselves at risk in their poems in a new and provocative way. Their daring work helped to inspire the popular style of poetry now known as "confessional." But partly as a result of their openness, they have become better known for their tumultuous lives—afflicted by mental illness, alcoholism, and suicide—than for their work. This book reclaims their achievement by offering critical "biographies of the poetry"—tracing the development of each poet's work, exploring their major themes and techniques, and examining how they transformed life into art. An ideal introduction for readers coming to these major American poets for the first time, it will also help veteran readers to appreciate their work in a new light.

The Shadow in the Garden

Unless otherwise noted, quotations from Delmore's work can be found in the Delmore Schwartz Papers. Delmore's own work has been sporadically in print, beginning with his collection of short stories, The World Is a Wedding, re-issued by ...

The Shadow in the Garden

The biographer - so often in the shadows, kibbitzing, casting doubt, proving facts - here comes to the stage. James Atlas takes us back to his childhood in suburban Chicago, where he fell in love with literature and, early on, found in himself the impulse to study writers' lives. We meet Richard Ellmann, the great biographer of James Joyce and Atlas's professor during a transformative year at Oxford. We get to know the author's first subject, the "self-doomed" poet Delmore Schwartz; a bygone cast of intellectuals such as Edmund Wilson and Dwight Macdonald (the "tall trees," as Mary McCarthy described them, cut down now, Atlas writes, by the "merciless pruning of mortality"); and, of course, the elusive Bellow, "a metaphysician of the ordinary." Atlas revisits the lives and work of the classical biographers: the Renaissance writers of what were then called "lives," Samuel Johnson and the "meshugenah" Boswell, among them. In what amounts to a pocket history of his own literary generation, Atlas celebrates the luminaries of contemporary literature and the labor of those who hope to catch a glimpse of one of them - "as fleeting as a familiar face swallowed up in a crowd."

The Way it Wasn t

SCHWARTZ , DELMORE Wasn't Delmore wonderful ? This shows where some of my funny tone comes from ( though also Perelman and Dudley Fitts ) but Delmore was six times better . Reading his letters makes me guffaw and weep - the end of his ...

The Way it Wasn t

Lavishly illustrated, "The Way It Wasn't" offers an intimate firsthand encounter with 20th-century Modernism, from the extraordinary man who defined it for America. James Laughlin--poet, ladies' man, heir to a steel fortune, and the founder of New Directions--was still at work on his autobiography when he died at 83. He left behind personal files crammed with memories and memorabilia: in "M" he is taking Marianne Moore to Yankee games (outings captured here in charming snapshots) to discuss "arcane mammals," and in "N" nearly plunging off a mountain, hunting butterflies with Nabokov ("Volya was a doll in a very severe upper-crust Russian way"). With an accent on humor, "The Way It Wasn't" is a scrapbook loaded with ephemera--letters and memories, clippings and photographs. This richly illustrated album glitters like a magpie's nest, if a magpie could have known Tennessee Williams, W.C. Williams, Merton, Miller, Stein, and Pound. In "C": "I wish that nice Jean Cocteau were still around. He took me to lunch at the Grand Vefours in the Palais-Royal and explained all about flying saucers. He understood mechanical things. He would advise me." In "P": "There was not much 'gracious living' in Pittsburgh, where at one house, the butler passed chewing gum on a silver salver after coffee." And: "The world is full of a large number of irritating people." In "H" there's Lillian Hellman: "What a raspy character. When I knocked at her door to try to borrow one of her books (hoping to butter her up) she only opened her door four inches and said words to the effect: 'Fuck off, you rapist.'" Marketing in "M": "I think it's important to get the 'troubadours' into the title. That's a 'buy-me'word." In "G": "Olga asked Allen Ginsberg if he was also buying Pound Conference T-shirts for his grandchildren. She was most lovable throughout." In "L": "Wyndham Lewis wrote 'Why don't you stop New Directions, your books are crap.'" And we find love in "L": "Cicero noted that an old love pinches like a crab." But in "The Way It Wasn't" James Laughlin's love of the crazy world and his crazier authors does not pinch a bit: it glows with wit and enlarges our feeling for the late great twentieth century.

Reading the Middle Generation Anew

Obituary of Delmore Schwartz, New York Times, July 14, 1966. The Times observed that Schwartz had died of a heart attack in the Columbia Hotel in Times Square, July 11, and that his body remained unclaimed at press time. 2.

Reading the Middle Generation Anew

Ten original essays by advanced scholars and well-published poets address the middle generation of American poets, including the familiar---Robert Lowell, Elizabeth Bishop, Randall Jarrell, and John Berryman---and various important contemporaries: Delmore Schwartz, Theodore Roethke, Robert Hayden, and Lorine Niedecker. This was a famously troubled cohort of writers, for reasons both personal and cultural, and collectively their poems give us powerful, moving insights into American social life in the transforming decades of the 1940s through the 1960s. In addition to having worked during the broad middle of the last century, these poets constitute the center of twentieth-century American poetry in the larger sense, refuting invidious connotations of “middle” as coming after the great moderns and being superseded by a proliferating postmodern experimentation. This middle generation mediates the so-called American century and its prodigious body of poetry, even as it complicates historical and aesthetic categorizations.Taking diverse formal and thematic angles on these poets---biographical-historical, deconstructionist, and more formalist accounts---this book re-examines their between-ness and ambivalence: their various positionings and repositionings in aesthetic, political, and personal matters. The essays study the interplay between these writers and such shifting formations as religious discourse, consumerism, militarism and war, the ideology of America as “nature's nation,” and U.S. race relations and ethnic conflicts. Reading the Middle Generation Anew also shows the legacy of the middle generation, the ways in which their lives and writings continue to be a shaping force in American poetry. This fresh and invigorating collection will be of great interest to literary scholars and poets.

The Disappearance of Literature

Chapter Nine THE CONSUMMATION OF CONSCIOUSNESS : THE POETRY OF DELMORE SCHWARTZ A contemporary of John Berryman , Robert Lowell and Randall Jarrell , equally gifted , yet in his gifts more vulnerable than they , Delmore Schwartz is a ...

The Disappearance of Literature


The American Poet at the Movies

Quoted in James Atlas , Delmore Schwartz : The Life of an American Poet ( New York : Farrar Straus Giroux , 1977 ) , 355 , 107 . 16. Delmore Schwartz , Genesis , Book One ( New York : New Directions , 1943 ) , 120.

The American Poet at the Movies

A timely and engaging exploration of cinema's influence on verse--a treat for poetry lovers and film buffs alike