The Commentary of Abraham Ibn Ezra on the Pentateuch Deuteronomy

Deuteronomy Chapter 28 , Verse 23 : cited in Deuteronomy 4:39 ( Page 23 ) Deuteronomy Chapter 28 , Verse 28 : cited in Deuteronomy 28:29 ( Page 133 ) ...

The Commentary of Abraham Ibn Ezra on the Pentateuch  Deuteronomy


Deuteronomy Chapter 28

A grammatical and etymological examination of every Phoenician Hebrew word in Deuteronomy chapter 28.

Deuteronomy Chapter 28

A grammatical and etymological examination of every Phoenician Hebrew word in Deuteronomy chapter 28.

Deuteronomy

In a similar way verses 11-26 are related to but distinguished from what follows in chapter 28. They are related by having to do with blessing and curse ...

Deuteronomy

In this theological exposition of Deuteronomy, Patrick Miller is sensitive to the character of the book as a part of scripture that self-consciously addresses different generations. He discusses the nature and character of the law as revealed in Deuteronomy, as well as the nature of the moral life under God. The treatment of Deuteronomy in the New Testament, and customary introductory issues such as authorship and date, are dealt with in terms of their significance for interpreting and understanding Deuteronomy's character and intention. Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching is a distinctive resource for those who interpret the Bible in the church. Planned and written specifically for teaching and preaching needs, this critically acclaimed biblical commentary is a major contribution to scholarship and ministry.

Deuteronomy Chapter 28

This is a must-have for every Yasharala man, woman, and child's personal library. Go deep into the Mosaic Covenant and discover its hidden secrets. Master, read, and speak the Blessings and the Curses.

Deuteronomy Chapter 28

Deuteronomy Chapter 28 Volume 3 presents a word for word breakdown of every word in Deuteronomy 28:15-29 including grammar, parts of speech, etymology, and pronunciation. This is a must-have for every Yasharala man, woman, and child's personal library. Go deep into the Mosaic Covenant and discover its hidden secrets. Master, read, and speak the Blessings and the Curses. Discover your nationality and true ancient language. This volume of books makes learning difficult concepts fast, fun, and incredibly easy. You will learn how to read Ibaryath (original Biblical Hebrew Language) by deconstructing and examining every Ibaryath word, phrase, and sentence in Deuteronomy Chapter 28. You will learn how Ibaryath words, phrases, and sentences are made and how to make them! Each verse is written in the Paleo Phoenician Hebrew script along with its transliteration and English rendering. Every word's etymological meanings from Strong's lexicon (with its Strong's number) and Brown Driver Briggs lexicon is presented. Gloss renderings are also presented. The format of each Volume is designed to stimulate and facilitate critical thinking and analysis. Volume discounts are available.

Deuteronomy 28 and the Aramaic Curse Tradition

curses of chapter 28 and has been well described by others, Eckart Otto in particular,” although without recognition of the particular subtleties of the ...

Deuteronomy 28 and the Aramaic Curse Tradition

This study considers the relationship of Deuteronomy 28 to the curse traditions of the ancient Near East. It focuses on the linguistic and cultural means of the transmission of these traditions to the book of Deuteronomy. Laura Quick examines a broad range of materials including Old Aramaic inscriptions, attempting to show the value of these Northwest Semitic texts as primary sources to reorient our view of an ancient world usually seen through a biblical or Mesopotamian lens. By studying these inscriptions alongside the biblical text, Deuteronomy 28 and the Aramaic Curse Tradition increases our knowledge of the early history and function of the curses in Deuteronomy 28. This has implications for our understanding of the date of the composition of the book of Deuteronomy, and the reasons behind its production. The ritual realm which stands behind the use of curses and the formation of covenants in the biblical world is also explored, arguing that the interplay between orality and literacy is essential to understanding the function and form of the curses in Deuteronomy. This book contributes to our understanding of the book of Deuteronomy and its place within the literary history of ancient Israel and Judah, with implications for the composition of the Pentateuch or Torah as a whole.

Deuteronomy

29:1[28:69] is obviously transitional, the Hebrew versification, which includes this verse in chapter 28, is wellfounded. See H. F. van Rooy, “Deuteronomy ...

Deuteronomy

Arranged as a series of sermons, the book of Deuteronomy represents the final major segment of the biography of Moses. The sermons review events described in earlier books and challenges Israel to faithful living in the future. The theological significance of Deuteronomy cannot be overestimated. Few books in the Bible proclaim such a relevant word of grace and gospel to the church today. At its heart, Deuteronomy records the covenantal relationship between God and his people. God graciously has chosen Israel as his covenant partner and has demonstrated his covenantal commitment to them. Moses challenges the Israelites to respond by declaring that Yahweh alone is their God and by demonstrating unwavering loyalty and total love for him through obedience. Daniel Block highlights the unity between the God depicted in Deuteronomy and Jesus Christ. Christians who understand the covenantal character of God and who live under the grace of Christ will resist the temptation to retreat into interior and subjective understandings of the life of faith so common in Western Christianity.

Deuteronomy

The whole of Deuteronomy can be summed up in this one affirmation : to ... The enemies whom God would use as instruments of his curses in chapter 28 ( vv .

Deuteronomy


Deuteronomy

Showers of Blessing , , Droughts of Curse Deuteronomy 27 : 1–30 : 20 Deuteronomy 27 continues the formal process of covenant making that concluded chapter ...

Deuteronomy

Deuteronomy is a living document that deals with issues that have relevance for the modern-day reader, including justice and the vision of the Great Society, individual responsibility versus the importance of community, and the nature of loyalty to God and to the world. By examining these issues, readers will draw striking parallels between the world of Israel several millenia ago and today.

Deuteronomy

Chapter 28 Deuteronomy Chapter 28 28:1 And it shall come to pass, if thou shalt hearken diligently unto the voice of the LORD thy God, to observe and to do ...

Deuteronomy


Deuteronomy

[ 28:69 ( ET 29 : 1 ) ] Deuteronomy 28:69 [ ET 29 : 1 ] restates the place and circumstances of ... 27 : 1 , 8 , and the blessings and curses of chapter 28.

Deuteronomy

This volume, a part of the Old Testament Library series, explores the book of Deuteronomy. The Old Testament Library provides fresh and authoritative treatments of important aspects of Old Testament study through commentaries and general surveys. The contributors are scholars of international standing.

Deuteronomy a Commentary

Blessing and Curses Deuteronomy 28:1-29:1 Chapter 28 expands on two words that were prominent in the preceding chapter—blessing and curse.

Deuteronomy  a Commentary


Deuteronomy New European Christadelphian Commentary

Deuteronomy Chapter 28 Deuteronomy 28:1 If you will listen diligently to the voice of Yahweh your God, to observe all His commandments which I command you ...

Deuteronomy  New European Christadelphian Commentary

Verse by verse exposition of the Old Testament book of Deuteronomy. Part of the New European Christadelphian Commentary series by Duncan Heaster

Rewriting and Revision as Amendment in the Laws of Deuteronomy

12:1–28). 2.1. Introduction. 2.1. Introduction Deuteronomy's legal code ... in the following chapters attempt to deal with the fallout of Deut 12:1–28's ...

Rewriting and Revision as Amendment in the Laws of Deuteronomy

La 4e de couverture indique : "Kevin Mattison argues that Deuteronomy was designed to amend the Covenant Code (Exod 20:22-23:19). He proposes a model of amendment, which draws on existing models of replacement and supplementation to provide a more complete explanation of Deuteronomy's rewriting of the Covenant Code"

Deuteronomy

2 But include them moses did. in fact, there are no explanations of blessings paired with the curses in chapter 27 as there are in chapter 28.

Deuteronomy

In this fresh commentary, Deanna A. Thompson makes this important Old Testament book come to life. Recounting God’s foundational relationship with Israel, Deuteronomy is set in the form of Moses’ speeches to Israel just before entry into the promised land. Its instructions in the form of God’s law provide the structure of the life that God wants for the people of Israel. Although this key Old Testament book is occasionally overlooked by Christians, Deuteronomy serves as an essential passing down to the next generations the fundamentals of faith as well as the parameters of life lived in accord with God’s promises. Thompson provides theological perspectives on these vital themes and shows how they have lasting significance for Christians living in today’s world. Thompson’s sensitivity to the Jewish context and heritage and her insights into Deuteronomy’s importance for Christian communities make this commentary an especially valuable resource for today’s preacher and teacher.

Studies in Deuteronomy

Ch. 28. The blessing promised, vs. 114. Let us remember in approaching this chapter that it is wholly distinct in every way from chapter 27.

Studies in Deuteronomy

Mr. Louis Entzminger I regard as the greatest Sunday School man on the American Continent. I have reached this opinion after close observation of his work in other fields, and after two extended engagements of Mr. Entzminger in my own church and Sunday School. His present undertaking in the form of Bible exposition adapted to Sunday School workers, is at once an important and much needed work. Having examined his production upon Genesis, I hereby express the hope that he may give equal thought, time, and intelligent treatment to the entire Bible. In case he accomplishes that task, he will put over a colossal undertaking, and one that will bring him the gratitude of thousands of Sunday School teachers and scholars. It has long been my opinion that his exceptional talents should be devoted entirely to the important work of Sunday School teaching, organization, and administration. W. B. RILEY

TOTC Deuteronomy

In doing so, 28:1 also links to 26:16–19, providing a transition between the specific covenant stipulations of 12:1 – 26:15 and 27:1 – 28:68. Chapter 28 ...

TOTC Deuteronomy

Deuteronomy has been aptly described as a book 'on the boundary': it addresses the possibilities of new life 'beyond the Jordan' as dependent upon Israel's keeping of the law and acknowledgment of Yahweh's supremacy. Moses leaves the people with his last will and testament that would ensure their success and well-being in the new land. Ted Woods expounds this book's breathtaking and all-encompassing vision, and shows how the Israelites, from king to ordinary citizen, were exhorted to make its words the interpreter of their life's story within the land.

Deuteronomy

Chapter 28 contains blessings and curses on those obeying or disobeying the Deuteronomic covenant. The collection is a compilation, containing a core of ...

Deuteronomy

This milestone commentary by Jack Lundbom is intended for any and all readers who want to better know and understand the key Pentateuchal book of Deuteronomy, which has had a huge influence on both Judaism and Christianity over the centuries. For Jews Deuteronomy contains the Decalogue and the Shema -- Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God is one (6:4) -- supplemented by a code of primal legislation. Deuteronomy is much cited in the New Testament and has come to occupy an important place in the life and doctrine of the Christian church. It lifts up important wisdom themes such as humane treatment and benevolence to the poor and needy and is rich in theology, calling repeatedly on Israel to reject other gods and worship the Lord alone as holy. Besides drawing on language, archaeology, and comparative Near Eastern material, Lundbom s commentary employs rhetorical criticism in explicating the biblical text. Lundbom also cites later Jewish interpretation of the book of Deuteronomy and makes numerous New Testament connections. An appendix contains all citations of Deuteronomy in the New Testament.

Young s Literal Translation of the Bible

Deuteronomy DEUTERONOMY CHAPTER 1 DEUTERONOMY CHAPTER 2 DEUTERONOMY CHAPTER 3 ... 25 DEUTERONOMY CHAPTER 26 DEUTERONOMY CHAPTER 27 DEUTERONOMY CHAPTER 28 ...

Young s Literal Translation of the Bible

Young’s Literal Translation of the Bible is, as the name implies, a strictly literal translation of the Hebrew and Greek texts (from the Textus Receptus and Majority Text). Compiled by Robert Young in 1862, he went on to produce a revised version in 1887 based on the Westcott-Hort text which had been completed in 1885. Young died on October 14, 1888, and the publisher released a New Revised Edition in 1898. Young used the present tense in many places where other translations used the past tense- particularly in narratives. The Preface to the Second Edition states: “If a translation gives a present tense when the original gives a past, or a past when it has a present; a perfect for a future, or a future for a perfect; an a for a the, or a the for an a; an imperative for a subjunctive, or a subjunctive for an imperative; a verb for a noun, or a noun for a verb, it is clear that verbal inspiration is as much overlooked as if it had no existence. THE WORD OF GOD IS MADE VOID BY THE TRADITIONS OF MEN. [Emphasis in original.]” For example, the YLT version of Genesis begins as follows: 1. In the beginning of God’s preparing the heavens and the earth--- 2. The earth hath existed waste and void, and darkness on the face of the deep, and the Spirit of God fluttering on the face of the waters, 3. And God saith, ‘Let light be;’ and light is. 4. And God seeth the light that it is good, and God seperateth between the light and the darkness, 5. And God alled to the light ‘Day,’ and to the darkness He hath called ‘Night;’ and there is an evening, and there is a morning---day one. Young's Literal Translation in the 1898 Edition also consistently renders the Hebrew Tetragrammaton (the four Hebrew letters usually transliterated YHWH or JHVH that form a biblical proper name of God) throughout the Old Covenant/Testament as "Jehovah", instead of the traditional practice of "LORD" in small capitals, which was used in editions prior to 1898. Young's usage of English present tense rather than past tense has been supported by scholars ranging from the medieval Jewish rabbi Rashi (who advised, "If you are going to interpret [this passage] in its plain sense, interpret it thus: At the beginning of the creation of heaven and earth, when the earth was (or the earth being) unformed and void . . . God said, ‘Let there be light.’") to Richard Elliott Friedman in his translation of the Five Books in "The Bible with Sources Revealed" (2002). There is a linked Table of Contents for each book and chapter.

Dating Deuteronomy

Chapter 28 of Deuteronomy pronounces a terrifying list of curses—fifty-three verses. Twice a long list of curses is topped with reference to the “boils of ...

Dating Deuteronomy

The Torah was recognized as a unit before the separation between the kingdoms of Judah and Israel. This book challenges established biblical scholarship derived from two assumptions of the Wellhausen Fallacy: a) Deuteronomy could not have been written before the time of Josiah (650 BCE); b) The existence of a group of redactors in the fifth century BCE or later. The first premise is based on the mistranslation of the biblical text. The second is based on the unlikely assumption that the scribes of the Second Temple era felt free to edit old documents or to ascribe their own writings to Mosaic times. The Samarian version of the Pentateuch is virtually identical to the traditional (Masoretic) text. It is preposterous to assume that the Samarians would accept a fictitious Torah composed by Judean exiles of the Persian period or later as authoritative. Neither Samarians nor Judeans copied the Pentateuch from each other. The biblical text and the Samarian texts are merely different editions of the same document.

Deuteronomy

The curses listed at length in chapter 28 would mostly come to pass. No part of Israel was to be free from God's curse. City and country would be affected, ...

Deuteronomy

In this clear introduction to Deuteronomy aimed for preachers, pastors and Bible students, Paul Barker covers the major themes and issues of the fifth book of the Bible. Helpful study questions at the end of each chapter provide opportunity for discussion in groups. This integral Old Testament book comes alive in this very useful guide. In Deuteronomy we discover the rich theology of the God who keeps promises, for Deuteronomy is a book which encourages and persuades us to trust in a faithful God.