Development and Subsistence in Globalising Africa

People in Africa, faced with challenges common throughout the world, live in their own ways. Africa can contribute to the world by sharing knowledge acquired through the struggles of development and subsistence, and by bridging the two.

Development and Subsistence in Globalising Africa

In Africa, people striving to live and survive under the complex relationship between development and subsistence have been directly or indirectly feeling influences of globalisation. As Africa's involvement in globalisation deepens, social phenomena are apparently synchronizing or becoming more similar to those in the rest of the world, but they are not homogenised with them, especially those of developed countries now or in the past. The dichotomic view distinguishing development and subsistence has already become outdated. Day after day, African people are trying to reconcile or bridge the two as capable actors. People in Africa, faced with challenges common throughout the world, live in their own ways. Africa can contribute to the world by sharing knowledge acquired through the struggles of development and subsistence, and by bridging the two.

African Land Reform Under Economic Liberalisation

His main publications include Development and Subsistence in Globalising Africa: Beyond the Dichotomy (Bamenda: Langaa RPCIG, 2021) and 'Agricultural Practices, Development and Social Dynamics in Niger', African Study Monographs ...

African Land Reform Under Economic Liberalisation

This open access book offers unique in-depth, comprehensive, and comparative analyses of the motivations, context, and outcomes of recent land reforms in Africa. Whereas a considerable number of land reforms have been carried out by African governments since the 1990s, no systematic analysis on their meaning has so far been conducted. In the age of land reform, Africa has seen drastic rural changes. Analysing the relationship between those reforms and change, the chapters in this book reveal not only their socio-economic outcomes, such as accelerated marketisation of land, but also their political outcomes, which have often been contrasting. Countries such as Rwanda and Mozambique have utilised land reform to strengthen state control over land, but other countries, such as Ghana and Zambia, have seen the rise in power of traditional chiefs in managing the land. The comparative perspective of this book clarifies new features of African social changes, which are carefully investigated by area experts. Providing new perspectives on recent land reform, this book will have a considerable impact on scholars as well as policymakers.

Contemporary Gender and Sexuality in Africa

... Predicaments and Potentials in Africa Editors: Takehiko Ochiai (Ryukoku University), Misa HiranoNomoto (Kyoto University) and Daniel E. Agbiboa (Harvard University) Volume 4 Title: Development and Subsistence in Globalising Africa: ...

Contemporary Gender and Sexuality in Africa

Africa has fostered a rich culture of gender and sexuality from which non-African societies can learn. Most African traditional sexual customs differ greatly from Western colonial thought, which prioritises an individualism that respects the individual's free will and way of life. Regardless of the existence of various images of Africa, globalisation and conflict have made it inevitable that African people today must respond to sudden changes in the political environment and norms due to the influx of new thoughts and ideas. From colonial tensions to the consequences of globalisation, women easily have to sacrifice their sexualities. Also, the reader can observe that the Japanese/African ethnographic surveys in this book are influenced by the researchers' personal backgrounds, including their religion, social class, and sexual orientation.

People Predicaments and Potentials in Africa

The African Potentials Series In this way, the concept of African Potentials has enabled researchers from Japan and Africa to ... Subsistence in Globalising Africa: Beyond the Dichotomy Editors: Motoki Takahashi (Kyoto University), ...

People  Predicaments and Potentials in Africa

The term 'African Potentials' refers to the knowledge, systems, practices, ideas and values created and implemented in African societies that are expected to contribute to overcoming various challenges and promoting people's wellbeing. This collection of articles, focused on African societies, is based on the idea that 'Africa is People'. In this book, African people are placed at the centre of the discussion. The book's contributors, all of whom believe in African people and their potentials, consider women, minors and young people, people with disabilities, entrepreneurs, herders, farmers, mine workers, refugees, migrants, traditional rulers, militiamen and members of the political elite, and examine their predicaments and potentials in detail. Africa is people, and African potentials can be found only in African people themselves.

African Politics of Survival Extraversion and Informality in the Contemporary World

... Predicaments and Potentials in Africa Editors: Takehiko Ochiai (Ryukoku University), Misa Hirano-Nomoto (Kyoto University) and Daniel E. Agbiboa (Harvard University) Volume 4 Title: Development and Subsistence in Globalising Africa: ...

African Politics of Survival Extraversion and Informality in the Contemporary World

This volume addresses two primary research concerns: first, considering extraversion (or extroversion) as a term for characterizing a region that is "mobilizing resources from their (possibly unequal) relationship with the external environment", a dynamic that constitutes a possible African potential; and, second, a survey of competing systems and strategies with a focus on relationships between formal and informal institutions in terms of their collaborations and conflicts. In addition, this volume contains three chapters examining very recent African responses to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic from a variety of perspectives. The final part of this volume contains an important contribution to the conceptualization of 'African Potentials'. This has proven to be a significant conceptual innovation, that allows intellectual access to alternative ways of thinking about latent ideas of universality.

Africa in the Age of Globalisation

On one hand, the continent is going through an important growth phase, while on the other, the manufacturing sector shares less than 10 per cent of GDP and agriculture remains at subsistence level (African Union Commission, 2013).

Africa in the Age of Globalisation

This is a collection of bold and visionary scholarship that reveals an insightful exposition of re-visioning African development from African perspectives. It provides educators, policy makers, social workers, non-governmental agencies, and development agencies with an interdisciplinary conceptual base that can effectively guide them in planning and implementing programs for socio-economic development in Africa. The book provides up-to-date scholarly research on continental trends on various subjects and concerns of paramount importance to globalisation and development in Africa (politics, democracy, education, gender, technology, global relationships and the role of non-governmental organisations). The authors challenge the familiar paradigms in order to show how imperfectly, if at all, assumptions about globalisation and development theories have failed in their depictions and applications to Africa. The scholars in this volume both inform and advocate for a re-visioning of perceptions on Africa and how it navigates global processes.

International Human Rights Decolonisation and Globalisation

Women do almost all the work of subsistence farming and domestic chores in southern Africa. ... the introduction of Western development models and the shift from subsistence farming to cashcrop agriculture (1995 Beijing Declaration).

International Human Rights  Decolonisation and Globalisation

Covering a diverse range of topics, case studies and theories, the author undertakes a critique of the principal assumptions on which the existing international human rights regime has been constructed. She argues that the decolonization of human rights, and the creation of a global community that is conducive to the well-being of all humans, will require a radical restructuring of our ways of thinking, researching and writing. In contributing to this restructuring she brings together feminist and indigenous approaches as well as postmodern and post-colonial scholarship, engaging directly with some of the prevailing orthodoxies, such as 'universality', 'the individual', 'self-determination', 'cultural relativism', 'globalization' and 'civil society'.

Development Globalisation and Sustainability

This largely involves subsistence farming , mixed with other forms of domestic work and the sale of ... Sub - Saharan Africa provides an important lesson in thinking about globalisation , because when we think about places becoming ...

Development  Globalisation and Sustainability

One of five new additions to the EPICS range published in 2001, dealing with more popular topics for the new specifications. EPICS brings a fresh approach to topics of current interest, allowing students to acquire an up-to-date and in-depth understanding of geographical issues. Each topic provides a wide range of detailed case studies and offers an intergrated approach to all aspects of geographical study.

Neoliberal Globalisation and Resistance from Below

Structural Adjustment and Subsistence Industry: Artisanal Gold Mining in Ghana. Development and Change 36 ... The Best of Times and the Worst of Times: Structural Adjustment Programs and Uneven Development in Africa: The Case of Ghana.

Neoliberal Globalisation and Resistance from Below

As bearers of their own emancipation, the political agency of the subaltern classes is a vexed question, a time-honoured one at that. Why do the subalterns endure injustices without revolting most of the time, but revolt sometimes against some injustices? The euphoria of ’globalisation-from-below’, this book argues, skirts responsibility of addressing this question by presuming a groundswell of resistance across the world against neoliberal globalisation. In contrast to this oeuvre, Neoliberal Globalisation and Resistance from Below engages this question squarely by using the socio-historical approach to explain why the subalterns resist neoliberal globalisation in Bolivia and not in Ghana. The author urges scholars of critical political economy to pay greater attention to why the subalterns resist, rather than how they resist, or what the ideal end of their resistance should be. Such refocusing of the research and political lens will yield a more realistic picture of what is politically possible in the social context of peripheral capitalism regarding an anti-capitalist revolution. The author further argues that this refocusing will cure many of the romantic anti-capitalist claims and banal wishful thinking of a socialist revolution in peripheral capitalist regions such as Latin American, The Middle East and North Africa (MENA), and Sub-Saharan Africa. Neoliberal Globalisation and Resistance from Below will be of interest to students and scholars of African politics, neoliberalism, globalisation, political economy and subaltern politics.

Challenges of Globalisation

He concedes that regional cooperation programmes may help the development of a transportation and technological ... South Africa , with urbanisation levels of around 60 per cent , does not have the kind of subsistence economy found ...

Challenges of Globalisation

An intellectual record of a riveting dialogue between the highly acclaimed Manuel Castells and South African scholars.

Development Centre Seminars Globalisation Poverty and Inequality

Nigeria's political economy is more complex than those of other African countries. ... It was a good mirror of the economy, which rested largely on peasant farmers, some dependent on subsistence while others grew cash crops.

Development Centre Seminars Globalisation  Poverty and Inequality

This book is based on an exceptional event in December 2000 which brought together civil society from poor countries and OECD experts. It emerges that globalisation can have a positive impact in poor countries, but only if policies encouraging more equitable distribution of resources are adopted.

Globalisation and Migration

According to this view, migration stems not from underdevelopment but from development itself. Generally the world's main labour exporters are upper-lower to lower-middle income countries such as North Africa or the Philippines.38 ...

Globalisation and Migration

This book critically examines the new issues and new politics regarding migration in the era of globalisation from a majority world perspective. It examines the current shifts in the global political economy and the effects it has, for example, in relation to rural displacement. When and how does this lead to national and/or transnational migration? We need to examine the ways in which migration is cut across and impacts on the generation of racism and xenophobia in the west. The issue of remittances by migrants to the ‘developing’ nations needs careful study as does the controversial issue of ‘brain drain’ versus ‘brain gain’ through migration. The growing importance of trafficking for forced labour has now been taken up by various international bodies but is it the new normality or simply an unfortunate side effect of globalisation to be overcome through legislation? Migration is becoming increasingly gendered in its composition and flows but also in the receiving countries where men and women do very different jobs. We can predict the increasing racialization and gendering of migration but how will the state and society respond to these shifts? This book was published as a special issue of Third World Quarterly.

Industrialisation and Globalisation

Lewis, W. (1955) The Theory of Economic Growth, Allen and Unwin, London. Liedholm, C. (1992) 'Small-scale Industry in Africa: Dynamic Issues and the Role of Policy', in F. Stewart, S. Lall and S. Wange (eds) Alternative Development ...

Industrialisation and Globalisation

In a refreshingly accessible style John Weiss presents a survey of industrialization in developing countries since 1945, as well as a study of the predominant theories of industrial growth in the Third World. This authoritative text analyzes: * the possibility of different paths to industrialization * the dominant neoclassical view and the challenges to this orthodoxy * the importance of small scale industry * the priority of technological change to industrialization. At a time when globalization is becoming an increasingly controversial phenomenon, this book offers a powerful argument that despite potential difficulties with market access, integration with the world market offers developing countries the opportunity for future growth via industrialization.

Globalisation

... globalisation 14, 17-18, 19, 20-22, 23 structural adjustment programmes 21, 130, 134-5, 136, 142-3, 144 sub-Saharan Africa economic development 131, 135, 136-8, 139 external debt 143, 144 subcontracting 72, 94 subsistence wages 38, ...

Globalisation

Bob Milward presents an alternative view of globalization and argues that indeed there has been a continuum in capitalist development, but that this has been forged by historical processes and the dynamism of the competitive forces of capitalism. Milward identifies the emergence of monopoly capitalism as an important shaping factor, and in so doing sheds new light on issues of underdevelopment, multi-national imperialism and crises in advanced capitalist economies.

An Emerging Africa in the Age of Globalisation

Water bodies should increasingly be viewed as development spaces and appropriate accompanying technological ... According to Porter and Brown, conversion of forests for subsistence and commercial agriculture may account for as much as ...

An Emerging Africa in the Age of Globalisation

Since the turn of the century, Africa has been emerging economically, politically and socially and striving to assert itself on the global stage. This book provides an interdisciplinary view of Africa’s struggle to find its unique voice and contribute to the dialogue of international affairs. Highlighting both challenges and opportunities, the book explores the multi-faceted economic, political and social debates that surround Africa’s emergence in a complex, increasingly globalised world. The author provides holistic, complementary and policy-oriented advice to African governments and policymakers on how to cope with new interrelated realities in an age of globalisation. This book will be of great interest to students, academics and researchers in the areas of political economy, international development, global governance, public policy and the international relations of African states. It will also appeal to African leaders, policymakers and governments who seek to increase the ability of their countries to cope with the challenges presented by a globalised world.

Subsistence Entrepreneurship

In: Nwankwo S, Montanheiro L, Aiyeku J, Ogbuehi A (eds) Dimensions of African business and development. ... World Bank Econ Rev 5(1):155–175 Mkandawire T (2005) Maladjusted African economies and globalisation.

Subsistence Entrepreneurship

This book focuses on the role of subsistence entrepreneurs in creating social and sustainable business opportunities on the global marketplace. Subsistence entrepreneurs use scarce resources to create new business opportunities, often in developing or emerging economies. In addition, subsistence entrepreneurship is increasingly being used as a way to facilitate market entry for small and medium-sized business enterprises that focus on collaborative innovation. The interdisciplinary contributions gathered here will expand readers’ understanding of the nature and characteristics of subsistence entrepreneurs, as well as the challenges they face. The central connection between subsistence, sustainability and social entrepreneurship is also explored.

Development in Africa

Looking at data from The World Bank's Doing Business indicators (The World Bank, 2014), globalisation has had a differential effect on the role of women in enterprises. Consider, for example, that between 2005 and 2010, ...

Development in Africa

Since 2000, countries across Africa have maintained over a decade of unprecedented economic expansion in a phenomena known as ‘Africa rising’. However, despite pockets of strong economic growth, Africa still faces major development challenges. In this important book the contributors argue that Africa as a continent must work on securing social and political stability and build effective economic governance to ensure the development of a society that is socially, economically and politically inclusive. Looking beyond the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) the contributors highlight what they consider to be the 12 major public policy conversations of the continent post-2015, from the legacy of African leadership, to the ‘youth bulge’ (and resulting unemployment) and climate change. The volume presents policy makers, academics and students with a chance to take a fresh look at urgent emerging challenges in post-MDG African development.

State Crises Globalisation and National Movements in North East Africa

Colonial capitalist development was encouraged in agriculture, commerce and transportation. ... accumulation through organising capitalist enterprises and linking subsistence and pastoral economies into the capitalist world economy.

State Crises  Globalisation and National Movements in North East Africa

By identifying the critical central contradictions that are built into the politics of the Horn of Africa, this book demonstrates that the crises of the Horn states stem from their political behaviour and structural forces, such as internal social forces, and global forces that have become involved on the sides of these states without requiring accountability, the rule of law, or the implementation of, at least, 'limited democracy'. The contributors provide a deep understanding of structural and conjunctural forces that have interacted in the processes of state power; the role of intervention of global powers; and the consequent failure to build state as a public domain. The book also enriches our social scientific knowledge that is essential to develop pragmatic policy measures to address these problems.

Globalisation and Seed Sovereignty in Sub Saharan Africa

... systems—the natural subsistence type of farming practiced across the world by the majority of local farmers. ... Africa's 'development crisis' is considered to be at the heart of a market-led globalisation, characterised by massive ...

Globalisation and Seed Sovereignty in Sub Saharan Africa

"It is my expectation that respect for the critical importance of seed sovereignty will in due course be recognised by member states of the United Nations to be as critical to global peace and security as the UN Charter demands in respect of State sovereign equality, justice, human rights and economic and social wellbeing for all peoples."—Denis J. Halliday, UN Assistant Secretary-General 1994-98 "A constructive contribution to our understanding of what is going wrong and what can go right in the complex area of seed sovereignty."—Dervla Murphy, renowned travel writer and adventurer "Keeping seed diversity alive is the secret ingredient, not just for the good, nutrient-dense food that every cook, gardener and farmer/producer needs, but for strengthening our resilience in the face of multiple environmental threats. This compelling and timely book helps us to understand what we are up against and how we can overcome it."— Darina Allen, internationally renowned cook, founder of Ballymaloe Cookery school and President of the East Cork Convivium of Slow Food This book studies the relationship between globalisation and seed sovereignty in Sub-Saharan Africa. It provides comparative case studies of the most recent Kenyan and Ethiopian seed laws, as well as a study of seed sovereignty 'on the ground' in a locality within Ethiopia. Based on extensive fieldwork, it identifies the interests and motivations of transnational seed corporations, global philanthropic organisations, state actors, and local farmers. It finds significant differences in the wording of seed laws and the exercise of seed sovereignty, applying theories of globalisation to help us better understand these varied outcomes. It shows that seed sovereignty has the potential to be shared between local, national, regional, and global authorities, but in different ways in different countries and localities. In the face of what might sometimes appear to be unstoppable global forces, these findings suggest that the exercise of seed sovereignty can be transformed even in a highly globalised world.