Dickens Reynolds and Mayhew on Wellington Street

Between 1843 and 1853, Household Words, Reynolds’s Weekly Newspaper, the Examiner, Punch, the Athenaeum, the Spectator, the Morning Post, and the serial edition of London Labour and the London Poor, to name a few, were all published from ...

Dickens  Reynolds  and Mayhew on Wellington Street

A glance over the back pages of mid-nineteenth-century newspapers and periodicals published in London reveals that Wellington Street stands out among imprint addresses. Between 1843 and 1853, Household Words, Reynolds’s Weekly Newspaper, the Examiner, Punch, the Athenaeum, the Spectator, the Morning Post, and the serial edition of London Labour and the London Poor, to name a few, were all published from this short street off the Strand. Mary L. Shannon identifies, for the first time, the close proximity of the offices of Charles Dickens, G.W.M. Reynolds, and Henry Mayhew, examining the ramifications for the individual authors and for nineteenth-century publishing. What are the implications of Charles Dickens, his arch-competitor the radical publisher G.W.M. Reynolds, and Henry Mayhew being such close neighbours? Given that London was capital of more than Britain alone, what connections does Wellington Street reveal between London print networks and the print culture and networks of the wider empire? How might the editors’ experiences make us rethink the ways in which they and others addressed their anonymous readers as ’friends’, as if they were part of their immediate social network? As Shannon shows, readers in the London of the 1840s and '50s, despite advances in literacy, print technology, and communications, were not simply an ’imagined community’ of individuals who read in silent privacy, but active members of an imagined network that punctured the anonymity of the teeming city and even the empire.

The Routledge Companion to Victorian Literature

Shannon's prize-winning book, Dickens, Reynolds and Mayhew on Wellington Street, provides a new methodology for exploring radical print culture in the mid-Victorian period. Drawing on the topo-graphical techniques of cultural geography ...

The Routledge Companion to Victorian Literature

The Routledge Companion to Victorian Literature offers 45 chapters by leading international scholars working with the most dynamic and influential political, cultural, and theoretical issues addressing Victorian literature today. Scholars and students will find this collection both useful and inspiring. Rigorously engaged with current scholarship that is both historically sensitive and theoretically informed, the Routledge Companion places the genres of the novel, poetry, and drama and issues of gender, social class, and race in conversation with subjects like ecology, colonialism, the Gothic, digital humanities, sexualities, disability, material culture, and animal studies. This guide is aimed at scholars who want to know the most significant critical approaches in Victorian studies, often written by the very scholars who helped found those fields. It addresses major theoretical movements such as narrative theory, formalism, historicism, and economic theory, as well as Victorian models of subjects such as anthropology, cognitive science, and religion. With its lists of key works, rich cross-referencing, extensive bibliographies, and explications of scholarly trajectories, the book is a crucial resource for graduate students and advanced undergraduates, while offering invaluable support to more seasoned scholars.

London s West End

Across the road, George W.M. Reynolds issued Reynolds's Newspaper.36 Arguably the most popular novelist of the nineteenth ... The West End 36 37 Mary Shannon, Dickens, Reynolds, and Mayhew on Wellington Street: The Print Culture of a ...

London s West End

How did the West End of London become the world's leading pleasure district? What is the source of its magnetic appeal? How did the centre of London become Theatreland? London's West End, 1800-1914 is the first ever history of the area which has enthralled millions. The reader will discover the growth of theatres, opera houses, galleries, restaurants, department stores, casinos, exhibition centres, night clubs, street life, and the sex industry. The area from the Strand to Oxford Street came to stand for sensation and vulgarity but also the promotion of high culture. The West End produced shows and fashions whose impact rippled outwards around the globe. During the nineteenth century, an area that serviced the needs of the aristocracy was opened up to a wider public whilst retaining the imprint of luxury and prestige. Rohan McWilliam tells the story of the great artists, actors and entrepreneurs who made the West End: figures such as Gilbert and Sullivan, the playwright Dion Boucicault, the music hall artiste Jenny Hill, and the American Harry Gordon Selfridge who wanted to create the best shop in the world. At the same time, McWilliam explores the distinctive spaces created in the West End, from the glamour of Drury Lane and Covent Garden, through to low life bars and taverns. We encounter the origins of the modern star system and celebrity culture. London's West End, 1800-1914 moves from the creation of Regent Street to the glory days of the Edwardian period when the West End was the heart of empire and the entertainment industry. Much of modern culture and consumer society was shaped by a relatively small area in the middle of London. This pioneering study establishes why that was.

G W M Reynolds and His Fiction

Dickens, Reynolds and Mayhew in Wellington Street: The Print Culture of a Victorian Street. Burlington, VT: Ashgate. Tindall, S.J. 1966. “Social Criticism in The Penny Dreadfuls: A Study of The Mysteries of the Court of London, ...

G  W  M  Reynolds and His Fiction

George Reynolds is arguably the most prolific of all nineteenth-century English novelists, reaching an enormous audience through his thirty-six novels. Often selling in very large numbers in weekly one-penny installments, his works were known as by the most popular English novelist ever. Yet today, he remains almost unknown in the canon of English Literature. A serious radical, strongly pro-woman, and a leading Chartist seeking the vote for all men, Reynolds’ vigorous heroines differ notably from the Victorian novelists’ timid norm. He was strongly pro-Jewish and pro-Gypsy, very interested in French and Italian society, but wrote for ordinary English working people. Dickens thought him a dangerous leftist: for all these reasons, he was excluded from the elite literary world. G. W. M. Reynolds: The Man Who Outsold Dickens reestablishes Reynolds as a major figure of mid-nineteenth-century fiction and an author of European range and status. This book examines his massive popularity and notable concern with the problems of ordinary people, especially women, in the complex and often dangerous new world of the modern city. With the support of his wife Susannah, Reynolds’ enormous influence would also make a contribution to the cause of mass political education through his role in the development of popular fiction and journalism. This book is a major innovation in the field of Victorian literary studies, with relevance to popular cultural studies, the politics of literature, and publishing history, presenting properly a much overlooked major English novelist.

The Bohemian Republic

167 David S. Reynolds, Walt Whitman's America: A Cultural Biography (New York, 1995), p. 378. 168 Shannon, Dickens, Reynolds, and Mayhew on Wellington Street, pp. 200–201. 169 McCann, Marcus Clarke's Bohemia, pp. 10, 44.

The Bohemian Republic

In the mid-nineteenth century successive cultural Bohemias were proclaimed in Paris, London, New York, and Melbourne. Focusing on networks and borders as the central modes of analysis, this book charts for the first time Bohemia’s cross-Channel, transatlantic, and trans-Pacific migrations, locating its creative expressions and social practices within a global context of ideas and action. Though the story of Parisian Bohemia has been comprehensively told, much less is known of its Anglophone translations. The Bohemian Republic offers a radical reinterpretation of the phenomenon, as the neglected lives and works of British, Irish, American, and Australian Bohemians are reassessed, the transnational networks of Bohemia are rediscovered, the presence and influence of women in Bohemia is reclaimed, and Bohemia’s relationship with the marketplace is reconsidered. Bohemia emerges as a marginal network which exerted a paradoxically powerful influence on the development of popular culture, in the vanguard of material, social and aesthetic innovations in literature, art, journalism, and theatre. Underpinned by extensive and original archival research, the book repopulates the concept of Bohemianism with layers of the networked voices, expressions, ideas, people, places, and practices that made up its constituent social, imagined, and interpretive communities. The reader is brought closer than ever to the heart of Bohemia, a shadowy world inhabited by the rebels of the mid-nineteenth century.

London Labour and the London Poor

Selected Edition Henry Mayhew Barbara Leckie, Janice Schroeder. Roddy, Sarah, Julie-Marie Strange, ... Shannon, Mary L. Dickens, Reynolds, and Mayhew on Wellington Street: The Print Culture of a Victorian Street. Ashgate, 2015.

London Labour and the London Poor

Produced between 1850 and 1862, London Labour and the London Poor is one of the most significant examples of nineteenth-century oral history. The collection teems with the minute particulars of the everyday—bits and pieces of London lives assembled into a precarious whole by the author, editor, and principal investigator, Henry Mayhew. Mayhew was interested in the social fabric of people’s lives, their labour and earnings, but also their families, education, leisure time, and religious beliefs. What gives his “case studies” such immediacy is that they seem to flow unprompted and uninterrupted from the mouths of his subjects: street sellers, dock labourers, musicians, rat catchers, vagrants, chimney sweeps, thieves, and prostitutes. All are captured in this newly annotated and selected edition of Mayhew’s four-volume work. Historical appendices include a contemporary map of London, reviews of London Labour, and other slum journalism from the period.

Romanticism and Illustration

In this I am, of course, following Bruno Latour, Reassembling the Social: An Introduction to Actor-Network-Theory (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005), 175; 183. Mary L. Shannon, Dickens, Reynolds and Mayhew on Wellington Street: The ...

Romanticism and Illustration

Explores a vital aspect of British Romanticism, the role of illustration in Romantic-era literary texts and visual culture.

The Ballad Singer in Georgian and Victorian London

Taithe, The Essential Mayhew, 16. Mary L. Shannon, Dickens, Reynolds, and Mayhew on Wellington Street (Farnham, 2015), 155. Bryan S. Green, 'Learning from Henry Mayhew: The Role of the Impartial Spectator in Mayhew's London Labour and ...

The Ballad Singer in Georgian and Victorian London

For three centuries, ballad-singers thrived at the heart of life in London. One of history's great paradoxes, they were routinely disparaged and persecuted, living on the margins, yet playing a central part in the social, cultural, and political life of the nation. This history spans the Georgian heyday and Victorian decline of those who sang in the city streets in order to sell printed songs. Focusing on the people who plied this musical trade, Oskar Cox Jensen interrogates their craft and their repertoire, the challenges they faced and the great changes in which they were caught up. From orphans to veterans, prostitutes to preachers, ballad-singers sang of love and loss, the soil and the sea, mediating the events of the day to an audience of hundreds of thousands. Complemented by sixty-two recorded songs, this study demonstrates how ballad-singers are figures of central importance in the cultural, social, and political processes of continuity, contestation, and change across the nineteenth-century world.

Collaborative Dickens

Dickens, Reynolds, and Mayhew on Wellington Street: The Print Culture of a Victorian Street. Farnham, UK: Ashgate, 2015. Sharpe, Will. “Authorship and Attribution.” In William Shakespeare and Others: Collaborative Plays, ...

Collaborative Dickens

From 1850 to 1867, Charles Dickens produced special issues (called “numbers”) of his journals Household Words and All the Year Round, which were released shortly before Christmas each year. In Collaborative Dickens, Melisa Klimaszewski undertakes the first comprehensive study of these Christmas numbers. She argues for a revised understanding of Dickens as an editor who, rather than ceaselessly bullying his contributors, sometimes accommodated contrary views and depended upon multivocal narratives for his own success. Klimaszewski uncovers connections among and between the stories in each Christmas collection. She thus reveals ongoing conversations between the works of Dickens and his collaborators on topics important to the Victorians, including race, empire, supernatural hauntings, marriage, disability, and criminality. Stories from Wilkie Collins, Elizabeth Gaskell, and understudied women writers such as Amelia B. Edwards and Adelaide Anne Procter interact provocatively with Dickens’s writing. By restoring links between stories from as many as nine different writers in a given year, Klimaszewski demonstrates that a respect for the Christmas numbers’ plural authorship and intertextuality results in a new view of the complexities of collaboration in the Victorian periodical press and a new appreciation for some of the most popular texts Dickens published.

Contested Liberalisms

Martineau, Dickens and the Victorian Press Crawford Iain Crawford ... 52. Nayder, The Other Dickens. 53. Dennis, Cities in Modernity, p. 1. 54. [Dickens] ... Shannon, Dickens, Reynolds, and Mayhew on Wellington Street. 67.

Contested Liberalisms

Reframes the long-standing critical narrative of the relationship between Harriet Martineau and Charles DickensDemonstrates, through new readings of Martineau and Dickens's travel in and writing about the United States, how their encounters with the American public sphere were crucially formative in both writers' careers and in their shaping as journalistsPlaces Martineau and Dickens within the context of Anglo-American liberalism, thereby expanding our reading of them beyond earlier schema framed in narrower terms of political economyExpands understandings of transatlantic literary exchange to offer a more comprehensive reading than those offered through an earlier critical focus simply on the issue of international copyrightFocusing on the importance of Martineau's contribution to the development of the early Victorian press, this book highlights the degree to which the public quarrel between her and Dickens in the mid-1850s represented larger fissures within nineteenth-century liberalism. It places Martineau and Dickens within the context of Anglo-American liberalism and demonstrates how these fissures were embedded within a transatlantic conversation over the role of the press in forming a public sphere essential to the development of a liberal society.

Researching the Nineteenth Century Periodical Press

Mary Shannon's recent study, Dickens, Reynolds and Mayhew on Wellington Street: The Print Culture of a Victorian Street (2015), shows how face-to-face encounters between writers, editors, printers, and proprietors were facilitated by ...

Researching the Nineteenth Century Periodical Press

Extending the work of The Routledge Handbook to Nineteenth-Century British Periodicals and Newspapers, this volume provides a critical introduction and case studies that illustrate cutting-edge approaches to periodicals research, as well as an overview of recent developments in the field. The twelve chapters model diverse approaches and methodologies for research on nineteenth-century periodicals. Each case study is contextualized within one of the following broad areas of research: single periodicals, individual journalists, gender issues, periodical networks, genre, the relationship between periodicals, transnational/transatlantic connections, technologies of printing and illustration, links within a single periodical, topical subjects, science and periodicals, and imperialism and periodicals. Contributors incorporate first-person accounts of how they conducted their research and provide specific examples of how they gained access to primary sources, as well as the methods they used to analyze the materials.

Robert Seymour and Nineteenth Century Print Culture

Shannon, Mary Dickens, Reynolds and Mayhew on Wellington Street: The Print Culture of a Victorian Street (Abingdon: Routledge 2016). Sillars, Stuart Painting Shakespeare: The Artist as Critic 1720–1820 (Cambridge: Cambridge University ...

Robert Seymour and Nineteenth Century Print Culture

Robert Seymour and Nineteenth-Century Print Culture is the first book-length study of the original illustrator of Dickens’s Pickwick Papers. Discussion of the range and importance of Seymour’s work as a jobbing illustrator in the 1820s and 1830s is at the centre of the book. A bibliographical study of his prolific output of illustrations in many different print genres is combined with a wide-ranging account of his major publications. Seymour’s extended work for The Comic Magazine, New Readings of Old Authors and Humorous Sketches, all described in detail, are of particular importance in locating the dialogue between image and text at the moment when the Victorian illustrated novel was coming into being.

The Rise of Victorian Caricature

Ian Haywood, 'George W. M. Reynolds and the “The Trafalgar Square Revolution”: Radicalism, the Carnivalesque and Popular ... See Mary L. Shannon, Dickens, Reynolds and Mayhew on Wellington Street: The Print Culture of a Victorian Street ...

The Rise of Victorian Caricature

This book serves as a retrieval and reevaluation of a rich haul of comic caricatures from the turbulent years between the Reform Bill crisis of the early 1830s and the rise and fall of Chartism in the 1840s. With a telling selection of illustrations, this book deploys the techniques of close reading and political contextualization to demonstrate the aesthetic and ideological clout of a neglected tranche of satirical prints and periodicals dismissed as ineffectual by historians or distasteful by contemporaries. The prime exhibits are the work of Robert Seymour and C.J. Grant giving acerbic comic edge to the case for reform against class and state oppression and the excesses of the monarchical regime under the young Queen Victoria.

An Underground History of Early Victorian Fiction

London, Radical Culture, and the Making of the Dickensian Aesthetic. New York: Columbia University Press, 2012. Shannon, Mary. Dickens, Reynolds, and Mayhew on Wellington Street: The Print Culture of a Victorian Street.

An Underground History of Early Victorian Fiction

Explores the journalism and fiction appearing in the early Victorian working-class periodical press and its influence on mainstream literature.

Racing the Street

Shannon, Mary L. Dickens, Reynolds, and Mayhew on Wellington Street: The Print Culture of a Victorian Street. Burlington, VA: Ashgate, 2015. Sheppard, F.H. W., ed. Survey of London: Volume 27, Spitalfields and Mile End New Town.

Racing the Street

Racing the Street traces the history of how race was used as a technology for gathering, assembling, and networking the early cosmopolitan city. Drawing on an archive that ranges from engineering blueprints and parliamentary committee reports to sensationalistic pamphlets and periodical press accounts, Robert J. Topinka conducts an original genealogy of the nineteenth-century London street, demonstrating how race as a technology gathers, sorts, and assembles the teeming particularities of the street into a manageable network. This interdisciplinary study offers a novel approach to the intersections of race, rhetoric, media, technology, and urban government.

Transported to Botany Bay

Shannon, Mary L. Dickens, Reynolds, and Mayhew on Wellington Street: The Print Culture of a Victorian Street. New York: Routledge, 2016. Sharkey, Michael. “Rosa Praed's Colonial Heroines.” Australian Literary Studies 10, no.

Transported to Botany Bay

Literary representations of British convicts exiled to Australia were the most likely way that the typical English reader would learn about the new colonies there. In Transported to Botany Bay, Dorice Williams Elliott examines how writers—from canonical ones such as Dickens and Trollope to others who were themselves convicts—used the figure of the felon exiled to Australia to construct class, race, and national identity as intertwined. Even as England’s supposedly ancient social structure was preserved and venerated as the “true” England, the transportation of some 168,000 convicts facilitated the birth of a new nation with more fluid class relations for those who didn’t fit into the prevailing national image. In analyzing novels, broadsides, and first-person accounts, Elliott demonstrates how Britain linked class, race, and national identity at a key historical moment when it was still negotiating its relationship with its empire. The events and incidents depicted as taking place literally on the other side of the world, she argues, deeply affected people’s sense of their place in their own society, with transnational implications that are still relevant today.

Victorian Sustainability in Literature and Culture

Her book Dickens, Reynolds and Mayhew on Wellington Street: The Print Culture of a Victorian Street (Ashgate/Routledge: 2015) won the 2016 Robert and Vineta Colby international Scholarly Book Prize. Michael Shaw is a Lecturer in ...

Victorian Sustainability in Literature and Culture

From a growing awareness of the depletion of energy resources and the perils of environmental degradation to the founding of self-sufficient communities and the establishment of the National Trust, the concept of sustainability began to take on a new importance in the Victorian period. An emerging sense of the fragility and instability of human and natural resources, and the deeply complex interweaving of the two, led many Victorians to consider how to preserve or protect what they valued, and how individuals, communities (or even nations) could survive and flourish in a world of finite resources. This collection explores not only nascent understandings of sustainability in ecological or environmental contexts but also encompasses consideration of the problem of psychological sustainability and emotional wellbeing in response to the upheavals of modernity. With chapters by scholars working in literary studies, history, cultural studies, and sustainability studies, the volume encompasses a wide diversity of topics, objects, and authors ranging from the 1850s to the early twentieth century. Victorian Sustainability offers new perspectives on debates about sustainability in the present by showing how our current concerns derive from an earlier historical context.

Other Capitals of the Nineteenth Century

Dickens, Reynolds, and Mayhew on Wellington Street: The Print Culture of a Victorian Street. Farnham: Ashgate. Sleight, Simon. 2013. Young People and the Shaping of Public Space in Melbourne, 1870–1914. Farnham: Ashgate.

Other Capitals of the Nineteenth Century

This book rethinks the notion of nineteenth-century capital(s) from geographical, economic and symbolic perspectives, proposing an alternative mapping of the field by focusing on different loci and sources of capital. Walter Benjamin’s essay ‘Paris, the Capital of the Nineteenth Century’ identifies the French capital as the epitome of modernity. His consideration of how literature enters the market as a commodity is developed by Pierre Bourdieu in The Rules of Art, which discusses the late nineteenth-century French literary field in terms of both economic and symbolic capital. This spatio-temporal approach to culture also underpins Pascale Casanova’s The World Republic of Letters, which posits Paris as the capital of the transnational literary field and Greenwich Meridian of literature. This volume brings together essays by specialists on Bayreuth, Brussels, Constantinople, Coppet, Marseilles, Melbourne, Munich and St Petersburg, as well as reflections on local-colour literature, the Symbolist novel and the strategies behind literary translation. Offering a series of innovative perspectives on nineteenth-century capital and cultural output, this study will be invaluable for all upper-levels students and scholars of modern European literature, culture and society.

The Transnational Voices of Australia s Migrant and Minority Press

Shannon, Mary L. Dickens, Reynolds, and Mayhew on Wellington Street: The Print Culture of a Victorian Street. Farnham: Surrey, 2016. Shattock, Joanne, ed. Journalism and the Periodical Press in Nineteenth-Century Britain.

The Transnational Voices of Australia   s Migrant and Minority Press

This edited collection invites the reader to enter the diverse worlds of Australia’s migrant and minority communities through the latest research on the contemporary printed press, spanning the mid-nineteenth century to our current day. With a focus on the rare, radical and foreign-language print culture of multiple and frequently concurrent minority groups’ newspaper ventures, this volume has two overarching aims: firstly to demonstrate how the local experiences and narratives of such communities are always forged and negotiated within a context of globalising forces – the global within the local; and secondly to enrich an understanding of the complexity of Australian ‘voices’ through this medium not only as a means for appreciating how the cultural heritage of such communities were sustained, but also for exploring their contributions to the wider society.

Charles Dickens and the Properties of Fiction

Dickens had been inventing scenarios between imaginary lodgers and landladies for over twenty years—indeed, Mrs Whimple, ... 7° Mary L. Shannon, Dickens, Reynolds, and Mayhew on Wellington Street: The Print Culture of a Victorian Street ...

Charles Dickens and the Properties of Fiction

When Dickens was nineteen years old, he wrote a poem for Maria Beadnell, the young woman he wished to marry. The poem imagined Maria as a welcoming landlady offering lodgings to let. Almost forty years later, Dickens died, leaving his final novel unfinished - in its last scene, another landlady sets breakfast down for her enigmatic lodger. These kinds of characters are everywhere in Dickens's writing. Charles Dickens and the Properties of Fiction: The Lodger World explores the significance of tenancy in his fiction. In nineteenth century Britain the vast majority of people rented, rather than owned, their homes. Instead of keeping to themselves, they shared space - renting, lodging, taking lodgers in, or simply living side-by-side in a crowded modern city. Charles Dickens explored both the chaos and the unexpected harmony to be found in rented spaces, the loneliness and sociability, the interactions between cohabitants, the complex gender dynamics at play, and the relationship between space and money. Charles Dickens and the Properties of Fiction demonstrates that a cosy, secluded home life was beyond the reach of most Victorian Londoners, and considers Dickens's nuanced conception of domesticity. Tenancy maintained an enduring hold upon his imagination, giving him new stories to tell and offering him a set of models to think about authorship. He celebrated the fact that unassuming houses brim with narrative potential: comedies, romances, and detective plots take place behind their doors. Charles Dickens and the Properties of Fiction: The Lodger World wedges these doors open.