Shed Bashing in the 1970s and 1980s

Others continued with their hobby on BR's totally dieselised and electrified network, and a new generation took up their Ian Allan ABC books on Britain's steam-free railway. Even by 1970 many non-standard or unsuccessful diesel types, ...

Shed Bashing in the 1970s and 1980s

Colin Alexander offers a nostalgic look back at something all railway enthusiasts will remember well - visiting local sheds and yards, or shedbashing.

BR Blue in the 1970s and 1980s

New Street was always a busy place to spend a day, with workings requiring an engine change from electric to diesel and vice versa. No. 46004 would be scrapped at Swindon Works in 1985. 46027 13 August 1982 No. 46027 (D164) is seen at.

BR Blue in the 1970s and 1980s

A look at an iconic period in British rail history.

Diesel and electric blue

Diesel and electric blue


Transport in Britain

East Coast line from 1962.32 BR continued a major programme of diesel locomotive acquisition , bringing 1378 diesel locomotives into service between 1963 and 1973 as against a mere 181 electric ones.33 In the 1970s , as the problems ...

Transport in Britain

Highlighting long term themes in Britain's transport history, this book looks at the dilemmas facing modern society and suggests several possible solutions. It covers all the major forms of transport, from the horse to the aeroplane, setting them in their historical context.

Tyneside Railways

The 1970s and 1980s Colin Alexander. It took a while for BR to repaint its diesel fleet from green into corporate blue, and this shot of Class 47s No. 1756 and No. ... 9014 The English Electric Type 5 Deltic, No. 55022 Royal Scots Grey.

Tyneside Railways

Colin Alexander examines the variety of stock on Tyneside's railways during the 1970s and 1980s. Including the railways and trains of Newcastle.

BR Diesel Locomotives in Preservation

As the new designs were being delivered BR became aware that increased loads and speeds were outpacing their ability ... they provided over 25 years' service with many only being withdrawn as traffic patterns changed in the 1970s/1980s.

BR Diesel Locomotives in Preservation

When British Railways (BR) initiated its Modernization Plan in 1954 it had little experience of diesel locomotives thus initiated a Pilot Scheme to trial combinations of the three elements comprised within a locomotive the engine, transmission and body.The initial orders for 174 locomotives were placed in November 1955, but even before the first locomotive had been delivered, changes in Government policy led to bulk orders for most designs being trailed. It was only in 1968, once steam traction had been removed from the network, that BR was able to review the success, or otherwise, of its diesel fleet and decide which designs to withdraw from service.The nascent preservation movement of the time was concerned to preserve steam locomotives whilst only buying diesel shunting locomotives for support roles on heritage lines and it wasnt until 1977 that any effort was made to preserve main line diesels. Once it was confirmed that diesel locomotives had an appeal to enthusiasts, further purchases were made that resulted in examples of most of the BR diesel classes being represented within the preservation movement.Fred Kerrs book details those classes which are represented on heritage lines, identifies where possible their location as of December 2016, shows many of them at work and shows what is involved in the restoration, maintenance and operation of diesel locomotives by the volunteers whose efforts are vital but rarely acknowledged.Some of the preserved locomotives were bought for possible use on the national network and this was facilitated by the Railways Bill 1993. A complementary album of preserved and heritage locomotives titled Heritage Traction on the Main Line details the locomotive classes whose representatives are still in regular use on the national network as at December 2016 and follows a similar format to this album.

Trains Culture and Mobility

Aware of the technical risks of the project, in May 1970 the BR Board authorized construction of an alternative, prototype high‒speed dieselelectric train (HSDT), later known as the High Speed Train (HST) and then the ...

Trains  Culture  and Mobility

Trains, Culture and Mobility is—along with its companion volume: Trains, Literature and Culture—the first work to thoroughly explore the railroad’s connections with a full range of cultural discourses—including literature, visual art, music, graffiti, and television but also advertising, architecture, cell phones, and more…

English Electric Class 40 50 55 Diesel Locomotives

The nameplates themselves were possibly the most stylish to ever adorna BR diesel locomotive, having both the name and ... During the early 1970s the nameplates began to vanish from the locomotives – their removal not always being for ...

English Electric Class 40  50   55 Diesel Locomotives

In this superb collection of colour photographs Martin Hart records the iconic 1960s diesels built by English Electric. This is the first volume in the Amberley Railway Archive series.

The Railway Magazine

Chiswell Green URC Hall , Watford Rd , St NRM engines in the 1980s ' : Peter Groom . ... Manton - Corby- DELIVERY was expected of four General Motors Glendon line 3,300 hp diesel - electric locomotives from the before they AV United ...

The Railway Magazine


New Scientist

Experimental Fiat YO160 electric railcar during body tilting tests. ... line began in March 1970, but as a precaution the four car ETG sets then introduced carried a 450hp diesel engine to power the lighting and other auxiliaries.

New Scientist

New Scientist magazine was launched in 1956 "for all those men and women who are interested in scientific discovery, and in its industrial, commercial and social consequences". The brand's mission is no different today - for its consumers, New Scientist reports, explores and interprets the results of human endeavour set in the context of society and culture.

Britain s Railways

They were the fastest diesel powered trains in the world in the late 1970s and early 1980s , with average speeds better than the less intensively occupied Japanese Tokkaido line . BR also initiated extensive research by the world ...

Britain s Railways


The Transport Revolution 1770 1985

In the 1980s the BR Property Board engaged in estate agency and leasing business in a big way, making a major ... was achieved.78 By the later 1970s the diesel locomotive rolling stock—diesel multiple units (dmus) and electric multiple ...

The Transport Revolution 1770 1985

For the new edition of this classic book Professor Bagwell has included an examination of transport developments since 1974 and particularly the radical changes in policy introduced by Thatcher governments since 1979. The inclusion of a large number of maps, tables and figures, and contemporary illustrations of principal modes of transport enhances the reader's understanding and enjoyment of the text. `The most comprehensive, detailed and up-to-date book on the subject.' -TLS `Full of apt and revealing examples which bring alive and make more readily intelligible the fundamental economic arguments.' - Agricultural History Review

Railway Centre York

Class 40 Once the pride of the BR diesel fleet, the English Electric Type 4, later Class 40, diesel electric locomotives ... ordinary passenger services and freight trains, where they proved to be reliable workhorses into the mid-1980s.

Railway Centre York

The ancient city of York has been closely associated with railways since their conception and promotion by the ‘Railway King’, George Hudson. Its impressive station and engine sheds have played host to the elite of East Coast Main Line traction as well as a wide variety of ‘locals’. The major stabling point of York North shed, coded 50A was home to a diverse collection of steam locomotives as well as welcoming visiting engines from the wider network. As such it attracted interest from enthusiasts not only of steam power but later on as an important diesel depot, finally closing but later to be reborn as the National Railway Museum. Constructed in 1877 it was the largest railway station in the world. Legendary expresses have called at the platforms under the imposing curved glass and iron roof, now a Grade II* listed building. Today’s ‘flyers’ race between London and Edinburgh at speeds unheard of in steam days while cross-country services also bring visitors keen to explore York’s historic and cultural heritage. Yet the sight and sound of steam traction is still a major attraction in this modern era, with crowds flocking to see preserved locomotives at the head of the trains which regularly grace these famous tracks. David Mather has brought together a collection of his images which represents York’s railway heritage from its earliest days through to the present and which shows the city to be still justified in claiming the title ‘Railway Centre’.

Routledge Revivals The Atlas of British Railway History 1985

Electrodiesel no. ... Freight operations during the 1970s had little of the success recorded in passenger business. ... Plate 99: Increasing traffic to London's second airport encouraged the Plate 100: A BR class 33 diesel-electric ...

Routledge Revivals  The Atlas of British Railway History  1985

First published in 1985, this Atlas uses over 50 specially drawn maps to trace the rise and fall of the railways’ fortunes, and is supported by an interesting and authoritative text. Financial and operating statistics are clearly presented in diagrammatic form and provide a wealth of information rarely available to the student of railway history. Freeman and Aldcroft provide the basis for a new understanding of the way in which the railways transformed Britain by the scale of their engineering works, by shrinking national space and reorganising the layouts of urban areas. Maps show the evolution of early wagon routes into the first railway routes, the frenetic activity of the ‘Railway Mania’ years, and the consolidation of these lines into a national network. This exciting presentation of railway development will interest the enthusiast as well as the more general student of British transport history.

South Wales Railways in the 1980s

I made my first visit to South Wales on 7 November 1970, when the first trip I went on was to the open day at Cardiff Canton. ... I had never previously seen English Electric Type 3 diesels, or Class 37s as they were later known.

South Wales Railways in the 1980s

The South Wales Division was one of the three operating divisions of the Western Region. Explore the South Wales Railways in the 1980s with previously unpublished photographs.

Britain s Railways in Transition 1976 90

... Locospotters' Annual gave a very erudite analysis of some of BR's motive power issues, saying that the English Electric Type 4 (Class 40) had been ... The shape of the 1970s and 1980s locomotive fleet was determined in other ways.

Britain s Railways in Transition 1976 90

A wonderfully evocative selection of unpublished images as John Evans explores this fascinating period of change in Britain's railway history.

Jane s World Railways

... per unit axles / car kW km / h service built Class 220 Voyager diesel - electric trainset supplied by Bombardier ... 6 66 24 1957 BR 1957 BR 1970 BREL 1970 BREL 1970 BREL 1967 BR 1988 BREL 2002 Siemens 2002 Siemens 2002 Siemens 1982 ...

Jane s World Railways

Contents include - Over 450 railway systems - Organisational structures - Locomotives and powered/non-powered passenger vehicles - Statistics - Traction and rolling stock manufacturers and suppliers of component systems - Signalling and communications systems suppliers - Permanent way equipment and services companies - Workshop, repair and maintenance equipment - Suppliers, manufacturers and service companies - Information technology systems for rail applications - Station equipment - Consultancy services - Leasing companies

British Railways Diesel Electric Classes 44 to 46

Fred Kerr lived close to the Midland Main Line in Northamptonshire and observed the class from their introduction in May 1959 to their final withdrawal in the 1980s and has amassed a collection of images showing them working both freight ...

British Railways Diesel Electric Classes 44 to 46

Derby Works introduced the first mainline Diesel to UK service with the production of LMS 10000 in 1947, although mainline diesels had previously been tested on post-Grouping main lines prior to being exported. When British Railways' Modernization Plan of 1955 was initiated by a Pilot Scheme to identify the best features for a future standard diesel fleet, Derby Works upgraded the design to produce its Type 4 - later Class 44 - locomotive that ultimately spawned 193 locomotives encompassing 3 variants which powered trains throughout the UK network. Fred Kerr lived close to the Midland Main Line in Northamptonshire and observed the class from their introduction in May 1959 to their final withdrawal in the 1980s and has amassed a collection of images showing them working both freight and passenger duties throughout the UK but particularly on the Midland Main Line where the Class 45 variant held sway for nearly 25 years. This album contains images from his extensive collection and, supported by a brief text, reflects the history of the 3 variants by showing the variety of services which they powered and the wide range of locations where class members were to be found.