Differentiation and Neoplasia

A specific example may reveal the potential value of developmental biologists interacting with cancer physicians. An example chosen at random suggests that probably any paper included in the symposium volume would serve the purpose.

Differentiation and Neoplasia

There is no commonly accepted mechanism to explain differentiation of either normal or neoplastic cells. Despite this fact, the organizers of the 3 rd International Conference on Differentiation recognized that there is much emerging evidence which supports the view that both normal cells and many cancer cells share common differentiative processes. Accordingly, the organizers perceived that clinical scientists and developmental biologists would greatly benefit by together considering differentiation. In that way, developmental biologists would be apprised of recent insights in cancer cell biology and the physician scientist would be updated on events in developmental biology and both would gain new understanding of the cell biology of neoplasia. A specific example may reveal the potential value of developmental biologists interacting with cancer physicians. An example chosen at random suggests that probably any paper included in the symposium volume would serve the purpose. Dr. Stephen Subtelny reviewed recent studies by his laboratory concerning germ cell migration and replication in frog embryos. How might those results interest the cancer scientist? Dr. Subtelny showed that primordial germ cells of a fertile graft will reverse their migratory direction and move into a sterile host. Perhaps in this context it would not be inappropriate to state that the germ cells of the graft metastasized into the host. Germ cells from grafts of a different species will populate the previously sterile host gonad.

Cell Differentiation and Neoplasia

Cell Differentiation and Neoplasia


Neoplasms with Follicular Differentiation

Every proliferation pictured histopathologically in this book is an overview of the morphologic features of every proliferation, enabling utilization of diagnosis by pattern analysis.

Neoplasms with Follicular Differentiation

This second in a series of monographs (Histologic Diagnosis of Neoplastic Diseases - a Method by Pattern Analysis) focuses upon making specific diagnosis based upon repeatable, reliable and accurate criteria and utilizes a method of pattern analysis with particular emphasis on assessment of silhouettes for diagnosis of neoplasms with follicular differentiation. The proliferations are illustrated richly so that they are easily recognizable, not only when the present themselves conventionally, but when they become disguised. Every proliferation pictured histopathologically in this book is an overview of the morphologic features of every proliferation, enabling utilization of diagnosis by pattern analysis. The drawings for silhouettes of entire proliferations are important didactic adjuncts to the photomicrographs.

Cell Differentiation of Neoplastic Cells Originating in the Oral and Craniofacial Regions

This book mainly describes the examination results of some morphogenesis regulation factors, such as Notch signalling, in the neoplastic cells originating in the oral and craniofacial region, especially in the odontogenic neoplasms, in both ...

Cell Differentiation of Neoplastic Cells Originating in the Oral and Craniofacial Regions

Development of the oral and craniofacial region is a complex and fascinating set of processes which require a sequential integration of numerous biological steps. For medical and dental doctors, interest is particularly high in this region, because it is composed of three blastoderms -- ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm - as well as neural crest cells. There are many different types of neoplasms in this region. In general, proliferation, development and cytological differentiation of the neoplastic cells reflect the normal physiological development of the outbreak mother cells and/or tissues. Collected human neoplasm cases, such as osteosarcoma appearing in the oral and craniofacial region, are examined regarding the immunohistochemical expression of some morphogenesis regulation factors. Furthermore, examination of Notch signalling is also conducted for some odontogenic neoplasms. This book mainly describes the examination results of some morphogenesis regulation factors, such as Notch signalling, in the neoplastic cells originating in the oral and craniofacial region, especially in the odontogenic neoplasms, in both well-differentiated and poorly-differentiated neoplasms of tooth germ enamel organ-derived neoplasm. In general, these morphogenesis regulation factors are responsible for cytological regulation of cell fate, morphogenesis and/or development. The results suggest that these factors play some role in cytological differentiation or acquisition of tissue specific characteristics in neoplastic cells. Furthermore, there would appear to be a relationship between the cytological differentiation in the oral and craniofacial neoplastic cells and the physiological development and differentiation of their originating mother cells and tissues of the oral and craniofacial region.

Neoplasms with Eccrine Differentiation

The main theme of the book is the use of pattern analysis with emphasis on silhouette for distinguishing benign neoplasms with eccrine differentiation from malignant ones.

Neoplasms with Eccrine Differentiation

Aims to familiarize practitioners with neoplasms with eccrine differentiation. The main theme of the book is the use of pattern analysis with emphasis on silhouette for distinguishing benign neoplasms with eccrine differentiation from malignant ones.