Difficult Freedom and Radical Evil in Kant

18 Henry Allison (Kant's Theory of Freedom, p. 136), and Richard Bernstein (Radical Evil, p. 24–25) suggest something similar, though the former, I think, would probably hesitate to use the word 'ontological'. 19 This 'individual level' ...

Difficult Freedom and Radical Evil in Kant

To speak of evil is to speak of a gap between what is and what should be. If classical approaches to this problem often relied on a religious or metaphysical framework to structure their response, Kant's answer is typically modern in that it places within the subject the means of its own moral regeneration. And yet from his first essays on ethics to later, more rigorous writings on the issue, Kant also admits an undeniable fallibility and inherent weakness to humanity. This book explores this neglected existential side of Kant's work. It presents radical evil as vacillating between tragic and freedom, at the threshold of humanity. Through it's careful exegesis of the Kantian corpus, in gauging contemporary responses from both philosophical traditions, and by drawing from concrete examples of evil, the book offers a novel and accessible account of what is widely considered to be an intricate yet urgent problem of philosophy.

Kant on Evil Self Deception and Moral Reform

Indeed, in another work, Wood claims evil necessarily involves self-deception, though, given the context of the remark ... that Kantian self-deception requires that “I become other to myself” (Difficult Freedom and Radical Evil in Kant: ...

Kant on Evil  Self Deception  and Moral Reform

Throughout his writings, and particularly in Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason, Kant alludes to the idea that evil is connected to self-deceit, and while numerous commentators regard this as a highly attractive thesis, none have seriously explored it. Laura Papish's Kant on Evil, Self-Deception, and Moral Reform addresses this crucial element of Kant's ethical theory. Working with both Kant's core texts on ethics and materials less often cited within scholarship on Kant's practical philosophy (such as Kant's logic lectures), Papish explores the cognitive dimensions of Kant's accounts of evil and moral reform while engaging the most influential -- and often scathing -- of Kant's critics. Her book asks what self-deception is for Kant, why and how it is connected to evil, and how we achieve the self-knowledge that should take the place of self-deceit. She offers novel defenses of Kant's widely dismissed claims that evil is motivated by self-love and that an evil is rooted universally in human nature, and she develops original arguments concerning how social institutions and interpersonal relationships facilitate, for Kant, the self-knowledge that is essential to moral reform. In developing and defending Kant's understanding of evil, moral reform, and their cognitive underpinnings, Papish not only makes an important contribution to Kant scholarship. Kant on Evil, Self-Deception, and Moral Reform also reveals how much contemporary moral philosophers, philosophers of religion, and general readers interested in the phenomenon of evil stand to gain by taking seriously Kant's views.

Kierkegaard and Kant on Radical Evil and the Highest Good

Kuehn, Manfred (1985)'Kant's Transcendental Deduction ofGod's Existence as a Postulate ofPure Practical Reason,'KantStudien, vol. ... Madore, Joël (2011)Difficult Freedom and Radical EvilinKant: Deceiving Reason, London: Continuum.

Kierkegaard and Kant on Radical Evil and the Highest Good

Kierkegaard and Kant on Radical Evil and the Highest Good is a major study of Kierkegaard's relation to Kant that gives a comprehensive account of radical evil and the highest good, two controversial doctrines with important consequences for ethics and religion.

Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope

Ahead of Sartre and Lévinas, Kant places on human shoulders absolute responsibility as the price for difficult freedom; yet the finite guilty will has no power to acquire innocent freedom. Lost innocence and so lost hope represent a ...

Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope

Opens a way for hope, forgiveness, redemption, and love to spring from evil

Kant s Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason

2 Kant's account of radical evil 2.1 The moral dilemma of radical evil This issue is the key to understanding ... 2009); J. Madore, Difficult Freedom and Radical Evil in Kant: Deceiving Reason (London / New York: Continuum, 2011).

Kant   s Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason

Kant's Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason was written late in his career. It presents a theory of 'radical evil' in human nature, touches on the issue of divine grace, develops a Christology, and takes a seemingly strong interest in the issue of scriptural interpretation. The essays in this Critical Guide explore the reasons why this is so, and offer careful and illuminating interpretations of the themes of the work. The relationship of Kant's Religion to his other writings is discussed in ways that underscore the importance of this work for the entire Critical philosophy, and provide a broad perspective on his moral thought; connections are also drawn between religion, history, and politics in Kant's later thinking. Together the essays offer a rich exploration of the work which will be of great interest to those involved in Kant studies and philosophy of religion.

Comprehensive Commentary on Kant s Religion Within the Bounds of Bare Reason

2011. Difficult Freedom and Radical Evil in Kant: Deceiving Reason. London: Continuum. Mahon, James Edwin. 2009. “The Truth about Kant on Lies.” The Philosophy of Deception, ed. C. Martin, 201–24. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Comprehensive Commentary on Kant s Religion Within the Bounds of Bare Reason

Palmquist’s Commentary provides the first definitive clarification on Kant’s Philosophy of Religion in English; it includes the full text of Pluhar’s translation, interspersed with explanations, providing both a detailed overview and an original interpretation of Kant’s work. Offers definitive, sentence-level commentary on Kant’s Religion within the Bounds of Bare Reason Presents a thoroughly revised version of Pluhar’s translation of the full text of Kant’s Religion, including detailed notes comparing the translation with the others still in use today Identifies most of the several hundred changes Kant made to the second (1794) edition and unearths evidence that many major changes were responses to criticisms of the first edition Provides both a detailed overview and original interpretation of Kant’s work on the philosophy of religion Demonstrates that Kant’s arguments in Religion are not only cogent, but have clear and profound practical applications to the way religion is actually practiced in the world today Includes a glossary aimed at justifying new translations of key technical terms in Religion, many of which have previously neglected religious and theological implications

Pessimism in Kant s Ethics and Rational Religion

Madore, Joel. Difficult Freedom and Radical Evil in Kant. Deceiving Reason. London: Continuum Publishing, 2011. Mariña, Jacqueline. “Kant on Grace: A Reply to His Critics.” Religious Studies 33 (1997): 379–400. Marion, Jean-Luc.

Pessimism in Kant s Ethics and Rational Religion

Dennis Vanden Auweele explores Kant’s moral and religious philosophy and shows that a pessimistic undercurrent pervades them. This provides a new vantage point not only to comprehensively assess Kantian philosophy, but also to provide much needed context and reading assistance to the general premises of Kant's philosophy and rationality.

The Palgrave Handbook of German Idealism and Existentialism

Kant: A Biography. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Louden, Robert. 2011. Kant's Human Being: Essays on His Theory of Human Nature. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Madore, Joël. 2011. Difficult Freedom and Radical Evil in Kant: ...

The Palgrave Handbook of German Idealism and Existentialism

This Handbook explores the complex relations between two great schools of continental philosophy: German idealism and existentialism. While the existentialists are commonly thought to have rejected idealism as overly abstract and neglectful of the concrete experience of the individual, the chapters in this collection reveal that the German idealists in fact anticipated many key existentialist ideas. A radically new vision of the history of continental philosophy is thereby established, one that understands existentialism as a continuous development from German idealism. Key Features Operates at both the macro-level and micro-level, treating both the two schools of thought and the individual thinkers associated with them Explores the relations from shifting perspectives by examining how the German idealists anticipated existentialist themes and how the existentialists concretely drew on the work of the idealists Meticulously uncovers and documents many little-known points of contact between the German idealists and the existentialists Includes often neglected figures such as Jacobi and Trendelenburg This Handbook is an essential resource for researchers and advanced students interested in thinking critically about the broad development of continental philosophy. Moreover, the individual chapters on specific philosophers contain a wealth of information that will compel experts in the field to reconsider their views on these figures.

Rethinking Evil

See also Gordon E. Michalson Jr.'s helpful discussion of the difficulties and instabilities in Kant's understanding of radical evil as an innate propensity ( Fallen Freedom ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 1990 ) , pp .

Rethinking Evil

This text examines evil in the context of a post-metaphysical world, a world that no longer believes in a God. The question of how and why God permits evil events to occur is replaced by the question of how and why humans perform evil acts.

The Bloomsbury Companion to Kant

'Kant on historiography and the use of regulative ideas', Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (2008): 523–528. ... Madore, J., Difficult Freedom and Radical Evil in Kant (London/New york: Continuum, 2011).

The Bloomsbury Companion to Kant

Immanuel Kant is widely considered to be the most important and influential thinker of modern Europe and the late Enlightenment. His philosophy is extraordinarily wide-ranging and his influence has been pervasive throughout eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth-century thought, in particular in the work of the German Idealists, and also in both Analytic and Continental philosophy today. Now available as a new and expanded edition in paperback, this accessible companion to Kant features more than 100 specially commissioned entries, written by a team of experts in the field, covering every aspect of his philosophy. The Bloomsbury Companion to Kant presents a comprehensive overview of the historical and philosophical context in which Kant wrote and the various features, themes and topics apparent in his thought. It also includes extensive synopses of all his major published works and a survey of the key lines of reception and influence including a new addition on Schopenhauer's reception of Kant. It concludes with a thorough bibliography of English language secondary literature, now expanded for this edition to include all cutting-edge publications in the area. This is an essential and practical research tool for those working in the field of eighteenth-century German philosophy and Kant.

Moral Upbringing through the Arts and Literature

Furthermore, in Difficult Freedom and Radical Evil in Kant, Joël Madore describes this as an “incongruity” in Kant's moral works, arguing that although Kant “cannot predicate the appeal of goodness on sensibility,” ...

Moral Upbringing through the Arts and Literature

Mark Twain, the great American writer of the South whose characters struggle with difficult choices, famously said: “Always do what is right. It will gratify half of mankind and astound the other.” Taking Twain’s phrase as a starting point, this book considers how literature and art explore different systems of values and principles of conduct, and how they can teach us to cope at times of trial. Morality remains one of the most contested areas of thought and ethics in the modern world, due to numerous misapprehensions and the move away from solidarity, from what we share and hold in common, particularly our inherent pursuit of virtue and consideration of principles concerning the distinction between right and wrong, good and bad. Featuring essays by scholars from countries which have seen traditions of virtue and character formation perish in the course of tragic social experiments, this book highlights the role of literature and arts in educating about virtues and character, in both a regional and global context. The volume offers philosophical analysis of moral education and engages with the literary canon, discussing the ways in which virtue was taught and can still be taught with Aristotle as one of the regained “tools of learning.” The essays span countries from England, Spain, Italy and Belgium to the USA, Costa Rica, ancient China and Israel, with Poland, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and Central Europe receiving considerable coverage. They address themes of virtue and character formation from the Bronze Age to the present and serve as inspiring reading for educators, literary scholars, historians, ethicists, artists and active readers.

Aesthetic and Artistic Autonomy

... James Hill Difficult Freedom and Radical Evil in Kant, Joel Madore Freedom and Nature in Schelling's Philosophy of Art, Devin Zane Shaw Grounds of Leibniz's Moral and Political Philosophy, Christopher Johns Kant's Concept of Genius, ...

Aesthetic and Artistic Autonomy

Whether art can be wholly autonomous has been repeatedly challenged in the modern history of aesthetics. In this collection of specially-commissioned chapters, a team of experts discuss the extent to which art can be explained purely in terms of aesthetic categories. Covering examples from Philosophy, Music and Art History and drawing on continental and analytic sources, this volume clarifies the relationship between artworks and extra-aesthetic considerations, including historic, cultural or economic factors. It presents a comprehensive overview of the question of aesthetic autonomy, exploring its relevance to both philosophy and the comprehension of specific artworks themselves. By closely examining how the creation of artworks, and our judgements of these artworks, relate to society and history, Aesthetic and Artistic Autonomy provides an insightful and sustained discussion of a major question in aesthetic philosophy.

The Unity of Content and Form in Philosophical Writing

... James Hill Difficult Freedom and Radical Evil in Kant, Joël Madore Freedom and Nature in Schelling's Philosophy ofArt, Devin Zane Shaw Grounds ofLeibniz's Moral and Political Philosophy, Christopher Johns Hegel's Rabble, ...

The Unity of Content and Form in Philosophical Writing

In The Unity of Content and Form in Philosophical Writing, Jon Stewart argues that there is a close relation between content and form in philosophical writing. While this might seem obvious at first glance, it is overlooked in the current climate of Anglophone academic philosophy, which, Stewart contends, accepts only a single genre as proper for philosophical expression. Stewart demonstrates the uniformity of today's philosophical writing by contrasting it with that of the past. Taking specific texts from the history of philosophy and literature as case studies, Stewart shows how the use of genres like dialogues, plays and short stories were an entirely suitable and effective means of presenting and arguing for philosophical positions given the concrete historical and cultural contexts in which they appeared. Now, Stewart argues, the prevailing intolerance means that the same texts are dismissed as unphilosophical merely due to their form, although their content is, in fact, profoundly philosophical. The book's challenge to current conventions of philosophical is provocative and timely, and will be of great interest to students and scholars of philosophy, literature and history.

The Science of Right in Leibniz s Moral and Political Philosophy

... James Hill Difficult Freedom and Radical Evil in Kant, Joel Madore Freedom and Nature in Schelling's Philosophy of Art, ... Frank Ruda Kant: The Art of Judgment in Aesthetic Education, Pradeep Dhillon Kant's Concept of Genius, ...

The Science of Right in Leibniz s Moral and Political Philosophy

Studies of Gottfried Leibniz's moral and political philosophy typically focus on metaphysical perfection, happiness, or love. In this new reading of Leibniz, Christopher Johns shows that it is based on a 'science of right'. Based on the deontic concepts of jus (right) and obligation, this science of right is established in Leibniz's early writings on jurisprudence and depended on throughout several of his major late writings. Johns shows that the moral rightness of an action is grounded in the rights and obligations derived from the agent's capacity for freedom. This new interpretation of Leibniz's moral philosophy compares Leibniz's positions with Grotius, Pufendorf, Hobbes, Locke, and Kant. Providing a comprehensive examination of Leibniz's most important writings on natural right, John's argues that Leibniz, properly understood, provides a compelling account of the grounds of morality and of political institutions-an account relevant to present philosophical debates.

Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity

... Language and Figure in Merleau-Ponty, Rajiv Kaushik Between Hegel and Spinoza, edited by Hasana Sharp and Jason E. Smith Difficult Freedom and Radical Evil in Kant, Joël Madore Freedom and Nature in Schelling's Philosophy of Art, ...

Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity

Typically, the first decade of Friedrich Nietzsche's career is considered a sort of précis to his mature thinking. Yet his philological articles, lectures, and notebooks on Ancient Greek culture and thought - much of which has received insufficient scholarly attention - were never intended to serve as a preparatory ground to future thought. Nietzsche's early scholarship was intended to express his insights into the character of antiquity. Many of those insights are not only important for better understanding Nietzsche; they remain vital for understanding antiquity today. Interdisciplinary in scope and international in perspective, this volume investigates Nietzsche as a scholar of antiquity, offering the first thorough examination of his articles, lectures, notebooks on Ancient Greek culture and thought in English. With eleven original chapters by some of the leading Nietzsche scholars and classicists from around the world and with reproductions of two definitive essays, this book analyzes Nietzsche's scholarly methods and aims, his understanding of antiquity, and his influence on the history of classical studies.

Metaphysics

Also available from Bloomsbury The Continuum Companion to Kant, edited by Gary Banham, Dennis Schulting and Nigel Hems Difficult Freedom and Radical Evil in Kant, Joel Madore Kant's 'Critique ofAesthetic Judgement', Fiona Hughes Kant's ...

Metaphysics

Alexander Baumgarten (1714-1762), an influential German philosopher preceding Immanuel Kant, is remembered mainly as a founder of modern aesthetics. Yet his manual on metaphysics was one of the chief textbooks of philosophical instruction in latter 18th-Century Germany. Originally published in Latin, Kant used the Metaphysics for nearly four decades as the basis for lectures on metaphysics, anthropology and religion. Kant composed many of the preparatory sketches for the Critique of Pure Reason in the blank interleaved pages of his personal copy. Available for the first time in English, this critical translation draws from the original seven Latin editions and Georg Friedrich Meier’s 18th-century German translation. Together with a historical and philosophical introduction, extensive glossaries and notes, the text is supported by translations of Kant’s elucidations and notes, Eberhard’s insertions in the 1783 German edition and texts from the writings of Meier and Wolff. For scholars of Kant, the German Enlightenment and the history of metaphysics, Alexander Baumgarten’s Metaphysics is an essential, authoritative resource to a significant philosophical text.

Michel Meyer s Problematology

... edited by Hasana Sharp and Jason E. Smith Difficult Freedom and Radical Evil in Kant, Joël Madore Freedom and Nature in Schelling's Philosophy of Art, Devin Zane Shaw Hegel's Rabble, Frank Ruda Kant: The Art of Judgment in Aesthetic ...

Michel Meyer s Problematology

In today's society, everything is in question. The reflexive questioning of modernity has fundamentally problematized society, including philosophy, which has experienced a crisis of metaphysics. Michel Meyer's problematology answers this crisis by questioning questioning, unfolding a new way of doing philosophy, with special relevance for the study of society. In this first-ever extended treatment of Meyer's work, Nick Turnbull examines the main features of problematology, including the principle of questioning and the deduction of an original conception of difference, based on the question-answer relationship. Turnbull shows how these concepts produce new perspectives in the philosophy of the emotions, history, meaning, politics, rhetoric and science. He applies Meyer's ideas to key questions in the philosophy of social science, showing how problematology offers important insights for understanding contemporary society. The book compares problematology with the work of well-known thinkers, including Bourdieu, Castoriadis, Collingwood, Derrida, Dewey, Gadamer, Heidegger and Lyotard. Turnbull uses problematology and rhetoric to explain how meaning is constructed through practice in the negotiation of social distance.

The Allure of Things Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy

... edited by Hasana Sharp and Jason E. Smith Difficult Freedom and Radical Evil in Kant, Joël Madore Freedom and Nature in Schelling's Philosophy of Art, Devin Zane Shaw Hegel's Rabble, Frank Ruda Kant: The Art of Judgment in Aesthetic ...

The Allure of Things  Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy

The Allure of Things: Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy contests the view that metaphysics is something to be overcome. By focusing on process and object oriented ontology (OOO) and rejecting the privileging of human existence over the existence of non-human objects, this collection explores philosophy's concern with things themselves. Interest in Latour, Stengers, Whitehead, Harman and Meillassoux has prompted a resurgence of ontological questions outside the traditional subject-object framework of modern critical thought. This new collection consequently proposes a pragmatic and pluralist approach to 'modes of existence'. Drawing together an international range of leading scholars, The Allure of Things fully covers the similarities between OOO and process philosophy, and is an essential addition to the literature on metaphysics.

Kant s Anatomy of Evil

Kantian radical evil is a huge topic, and my aim in what follows is by no means to cover all of this difficult and ... Freedom. One common criticism of Kant's doctrine of radical evil is that ultimately it does not explain anything.

Kant s Anatomy of Evil

Kant infamously claimed that all human beings, without exception, are evil by nature. This collection of essays critically examines and elucidates what he must have meant by this indictment. It shows the role which evil plays in his overall philosophical project and analyses its relation to individual autonomy. Furthermore, it explores the relevance of Kant's views for understanding contemporary questions such as crimes against humanity and moral reconstruction. Leading scholars in the field engage a wide range of sources from which a distinctly Kantian theory of evil emerges, both subtle and robust, and capable of shedding light on the complex dynamics of human immorality.

Fallen Freedom

Professor Michalson examines a doctrine of 'radical evil' which much resembles the Christian doctrine of original sin, and shows that Kant is only able to save his philosopher's credentials at the cost of appearing deeply ambivalent ...

Fallen Freedom

A clear exposition of evil and moral regeneration as they appear in Kant's late work Religion Within the Limits of Reason Alone (1793). Professor Michalson examines a doctrine of 'radical evil' which much resembles the Christian doctrine of original sin, and shows that Kant is only able to save his philosopher's credentials at the cost of appearing deeply ambivalent regarding the relationships between divine action and human antonomy.