How to Dig a Hole to the Other Side of the World

‘[An] irresistible account of a child’s imaginary 8,000-mile journey through the earth to discover what’s inside.

How to Dig a Hole to the Other Side of the World

‘[An] irresistible account of a child’s imaginary 8,000-mile journey through the earth to discover what’s inside. Facts about the composition of the earth are conveyed painlessly and memorably.’ —SLJ. ‘An exciting adventure. . . . Illustrations [by Caldecott Medal winner Marc Simont] explode with color and action.’ —CS. Best Books of 1979 (SLJ) Children's Choices for 1980 (IRA/CBC) A Reading Rainbow Selection

Digging a Hole to the Moon

This collection chronicles the seemingly despair-filled lives of dreamers who try to find spirituality in the haunted mountains, deserts, and crumbling cities of California - Atheist faith healers, despairing angels, and tired immortals ...

Digging a Hole to the Moon

Digging a Hole to the Moon traverses the haunting and beautiful story of a generation struggling to survive the realities of the new recession. This collection chronicles the seemingly despair-filled lives of dreamers who try to find spirituality in the haunted mountains, deserts, and crumbling cities of California - Atheist faith healers, despairing angels, and tired immortals brush shoulders with hopeful teachers, politely depressed undertakers, and Byronic suburban street racers as they all search for some impossible transcendence, as they dig their holes toward the moon.

One Mole Digging a Hole

Count along as the animals lend a hand in the garden.

One Mole Digging a Hole

All the animals are busy lending a hand in the garden in this lively numbers book! The parrots are pulling up carrots, the foxes are filling boxes and a swarm of bees are pruning the trees with their miniature shears. Even the smallest toddler will enjoy the wonderfully silly animal antics in this book, so join in and count along -- gardening has never been so much fun!Trademark Julia Donaldson rhymes and rhythms are perfect to read aloud, and Nick Sharratt's mischievous and funny illustrations make the bright and playful One Mole Digging a Hole a sure winner. Just right for toddlers!Look out for: Hippo Has a Hat, Chocolate Mousse for Greedy Goose, Animal Music, Toddle Waddle and Goat Goes to Playgroup.

Sam Dave Dig a Hole

Sam and Dave are sure they will discover something exciting if they just keep digging their hole.

Sam   Dave Dig a Hole

Sam and Dave are sure they will discover something exciting if they just keep digging their hole.

Digging a Hole

From New York Times Bestseller, Mimi Jean Pamfiloff, Comes Book Three of the OHellNO Series, DIGGING A HOLE. (Standalone.) HE'S THE MEANEST BOSS EVER.

Digging a Hole

From New York Times Bestseller, Mimi Jean Pamfiloff, Comes Book Three of the OHellNO Series, DIGGING A HOLE. (Standalone.) HE'S THE MEANEST BOSS EVER. SHE'S THE SWEET SHY INTERN. THEY'RE ABOUT TO WRECK EACH OTHER CRAZY. My name is Sydney Lucas. I am smart, deathly shy, and one-hundred percent determined to make my own way in the world. Which is why I jumped at the chance to intern for Mr. Nick Brooks despite his reputation. After ten failed interviews at other companies, he was the only one offering. Plus, everyone says he knows his stuff and surely a man as stunningly handsome as him can't be "the devil incarnate," right? Wrong. Oh...that man. That freakin' man has got to go! I've been on the job one week, and he's insulted my mother, wardrobe shamed me, and managed to make me cry. Twice. Underneath that stone-cold, beautiful face is the evilest human being ever. But I'm not going to quit. Oh no. For once in my life, I've got to make a stand. Only every time I open my mouth, I can't quite seem to muster the courage. Perhaps my revenge needs to come in another form: destroying him quietly. Because I've got a secret. I'm not really just an intern, and Sydney Lucas isn't my real name.

When in a Hole Stop Digging

Simon, whose major qualities were digging holes or making the tea, offered a philosophical observation. 'Is a bird in your bush better than a fish in your sink?' Reginald was used to his absurd comments, and so retaliated.

When in a Hole  Stop Digging

An ordinary day in a sleepy village deteriorates into chaos. Livid boat owner Albert vows revenge after a humiliating event, and shocked residents of a brand new housing estate mysteriously find fish in the plumbing. A heartless double murderer on the loose and a gun-toting farmer send shivers through the town of Throttle as two amateur sleuths try to make sense of it all. Meanwhile a pair of sixties throwback detectives attempt to piece it all together, but in reality make matters worse. The local free press needs a story fast, but the novice reporters get a shock as they enter a world far beyond their capability. Finally, one resident, pushed to the edge by a marital issue, sinks to a new low. The mayhem continues.....

Digging the hole

Digging the hole


Moles Present the Natural Tolls of Digging Holes

Like busy moles, we humans dig an awful lot of holes to get things done, in the ground, in our oceans, and even in our bathrooms!

Moles Present the Natural Tolls of Digging Holes


Digging for Treasure

On investigation I have had to pull the person out of a deep hole on the handle end of my fork. Leave a step if you are going to dig eight feet straight down! I used to have a digging friend who was very stockily-built, short arms and ...

Digging for Treasure

Digging for Treasure could possibly have been titled "Memoirs of a Dump Digger," as although it is a practical book packed with know-how gained by the author over a number of years, all the information passed on through the book is from the author's own real-life experiences. Digging into Victorian and Edwardian rubbish dumps may seem a crazy way to earn a living, but many thousands of people in Britain alone have been involved in such a hobby part-time since the 1970s. It all started in the U.S.A. in the 1950s when old frontier towns were searched for their throwaway bottles. The patent quack medicine bottles of the 19th century proved a fascinating subject of research. Dump- digging soon spread to Canada and the U.K. and is also particularly strong in Australia. The finds in old refuse are not just bottles. In a century when local chemists made their own toothpaste in the back of the shop, it was sold in small ceramic pots with lids which had printed advertising on them under the glaze. Chemists could design their own advertising lids and the individuality and naivety of these is part of their charm. This was a time before the invention of the squeezable tube which we use today for toothpaste, creams and ointments. Ointments claiming to cure a wide variety of illnesses were sold in these pots, something which is illegal today. Ointments can alleviate or soothe problems, but they cannot claim to cure! In Digging for Treasure the author points out that once a dump has been emptied of its finds by hordes of collector-diggers, they have to constantly be searching for other sites. This has become a problem today as gradually more and more old rubbish dumps disappear under the building of trading estates, car parks and housing estates. Whilst this is admittedly true, the author believes there are still some town dumps yet to be found, although fast disappearing. Also he advocates the re-digging of sites which were inefficiently dug by zealous collectors the first time around. Victorian refuse dumps yield a wide variety of glass bottles, printed stoneware and ceramic pots and advertising lids, clay pipes with decorated bowls, china dolls' heads, brown salt-glazed stoneware bottles and jars. Some of the rarer bottles and pot-lids are now selling for several hundreds of pounds and the very rare up to £5,000. As sites become even more difficult to find, this trend for higher prices must continue. The author points the way to the future in what he describes as the "forgotten dumps." In the book he describes the research he has done on the collection of refuse in the U.K. which is a subject most of us pay scant attention to. Many would believe that there has always been a collection of our waste, but this is not so. In many towns and villages, the collection of household waste was not organised until after 1900. The smaller the village, the later was collection introduced. Although in London and a few other large cities, refuse collection began from about the 1880s, some small villages did not have this facility until about 1920. As town dumps gradually disappear under buildings, the author points the way forward for dump-diggers of the future what he calls the forgotten dumps and he claims there are tens of thousands of them to be found. The hobby of bottle-collecting also covers the collecting of pot-lids and other finds and in all English-speaking countries there are clubs, magazines and auctions to cater for collectors. Online auctions on e-bay for antique bottles and pot-lids receive bids from all over the world. Bottles and pot-lids are big business and for anyone wishing to dig up their own antiques, this book is indispensable.

Digging Up the Past

Smallersized posts and stakes were normally driven in, but on most subsoils the normal way to set up a post was to dig a hole, stand up the post, and ram in earth and stones around it to hold it upright.

Digging Up the Past

This concise, readable, well-illustrated introduction to practical archaeology presents new excavation techniques and challenges traditional approaches to site organization and recording.

Everyone Loves Ronald McDonald

now while the other continues digging this hole,I mean digging this hole is suddenly terribly important, I mean to make itas wide and deep asI can, “I mean I'd like for us to remain friends,” she says, “you're really this terrific ...

Everyone Loves Ronald McDonald

This is a zany romp through the modern American landscape, with the tour guide one Bingo Sherman, a possible descendant of the controversial Civil War general. Bingo, a joyous cross between Salinger’s Holden Caulfield and Kafka’s Joseph K attacks life with a zest that belies his Florida Panhandle origins. In this coming of age novel the action moves briefly from Miami’s South Beach to New York’s Upper West Side then back to South Beach again. Bingo is a seeker with a difference: he has absolutely no idea what he is seeking and knows only what he is not ready to settle for. The characters he encounters along the way serve to both open his eyes as well as to toughen him up for life’s many trials still ahead. Throughout the novel looms the almost mythical figure of Ronald McDonald, Bingo’s childhood hero for whom he still harbors a soft spot in his heart. Everyone Loves Ronald McDonald strikes just the right tone between irreverence and acute observation, and promises a rollicking good experience for anyone with common or even uncommon good sense.

The Heart of Jacob

His friend was such a good bandicoot rat hunter that he could even tell the size of a bandicoot rat by the size of the hole and the food items they were turning up while digging the hole. That day they found a hole his friend said a ...

The Heart of Jacob

Jacob prospers as a moneylender and pig merchant by taking advantage of other people’s misfortunes. But when he seeks to exploit the famine afflicting his village Tounga by lending money at high interest rates to poor villagers, he does not reckon what a sacrilege his pigs would commit which give the people an opportunity to feast on his own misfortune. When this happens community gives way to individual desires, and the stomach dictates to the head what it should think and believe in. Reason bends to absurdity and custom bows to bizarre novelty. Life explodes into a sinister mess that points to only one outcome: Jacob and society’s ultimate ruin.

Digging for Treasure

Dig a deep hole boys and dig it large.” The men began to dig. “Deeper and larger,” the Captain shouted. “But, Sir, it's already large enough for the chest,” said one of the young men no older than fifteen. “Larger, I said!

Digging for Treasure

Who cares what happened four hundred years ago? Digging for Treasure does! How could a dog solve a mystery? Digging for Treasure finds out! What happens when a dead person is not really dead? Digging for Treasure tells us! What kind of romance can happen in the workplace? Digging for Treasure shows us! Does retirement mean closing down life? Digging for Treasure thinks not! What makes people change their minds? Digging for Treasure answers that! Where do people get their motives for crime? Digging for Treasure knows!

I m Digging a Hole to China

This is a book of poems and drawings by Isaac, a child author who is 10 years old.

I m Digging a Hole to China

This is a book of poems and drawings by Isaac, a child author who is 10 years old. Isaac came up with the ideas for each of the poems, wrote each of them independently and created all the drawings for this book with minimal input from his parents. His dad scanned the drawings into the computer and entered all the poems into this book with very little grammatical editing. Isaac chose the title and cover art. His parents added the final formalities of the book such as the parent review and the about the author page and published it using Lulu. Check it out. We think you will like it!: )

The Apple Grower

That said, big machines are not for digging the actual planting hole and realizing intimacy with the land. Such ground needs to be tilled and cover-cropped down each row-to-be to properly condition the soil.

The Apple Grower

For decades fruit growers have sprayed their trees with toxic chemicals in an attempt to control a range of insect and fungal pests. Yet it is possible to grow apples responsibly, by applying the intuitive knowledge of our great-grandparents with the fruits of modern scientific research and innovation. Since The Apple Grower first appeared in 1998, orchardist Michael Phillips has continued his research with apples, which have been called "organic's final frontier." In this new edition of his widely acclaimed work, Phillips delves even deeper into the mysteries of growing good fruit with minimal inputs. Some of the cuttingedge topics he explores include: The use of kaolin clay as an effective strategy against curculio and borers, as well as its limitations Creating a diverse, healthy orchard ecosystem through understory management of plants, nutrients, and beneficial microorganisms How to make a small apple business viable by focusing on heritage and regional varieties, value-added products, and the "community orchard" model The author's personal voice and clear-eyed advice have already made The Apple Grower a classic among small-scale growers and home orchardists. In fact, anyone serious about succeeding with apples needs to have this updated edition on their bookshelf.

Enchantment and Despair

One spring morning, while the older boys ran off to catch gophers during recess, Harold and Henry began digging a hole in the southwest corner of the school yard. The school had no windows on the west, so the teacher could not see them.

Enchantment and Despair

Deadly drought, near fatal accidents, blizzards, grasshopper plagues, choking dust storms, endless days of relentless toil for measly crop yields ... ... enchanting big skies, an endless undulating prairie, the spine-tingling cry of midnight coyotes, the self-satisfaction of scratching sustenance from the earth ... This is the Montana of Calvin Wall Redekop’s childhood, a place at once what the neighbors labeled “the most awful forsaken place God had ever created” and a magical world for a wide-eyed boy. These background forces of hardship and wonder constituted Redekop’s earliest memories and in the retrospective vision of these remembrances he finds the subtle basis for his subsequent personal development and orientation. The mutual interdependence in the homesteading community encountered in Enchantment and Despair: A Montana Childhood 1925 – 1937 helped Redekop see the significance and power of cooperative human ventures, and recognize the importance of the environment in human survival: awareness the author has acted upon throughout his life. Readers will be transported back in time by this vivid account of another age and, like its author, pass through despair to find themselves enchanted.