Digital Culture Play and Identity

This book examines the complexity of World of Warcraft from a variety of perspectives, exploring the cultural and social implications of the proliferation of ever more complex digital gameworlds.

Digital Culture  Play  and Identity

World of Warcraft is the world's most popular massively multiplayer online game (MMOG), with (as of March 2007) more than eight million active subscribers across Europe, North America, Asia, and Australia, who play the game an astonishing average of twenty hours a week. This book examines the complexity of World of Warcraft from a variety of perspectives, exploring the cultural and social implications of the proliferation of ever more complex digital gameworlds. The contributors have immersed themselves in the World of Warcraft universe, spending hundreds of hours as players (leading guilds and raids, exploring moneymaking possibilities in the in-game auction house, playing different factions, races, and classes), conducting interviews, and studying the game design--as created by Blizzard Entertainment, the game's developer, and as modified by player-created user interfaces. The analyses they offer are based on both the firsthand experience of being a resident of Azeroth and the data they have gathered and interpreted. The contributors examine the ways that gameworlds reflect the real world--exploring such topics as World of Warcraft as a "capitalist fairytale" and the game's construction of gender; the cohesiveness of the gameworld in terms of geography, mythology, narrative, and the treatment of death as a temporary state; aspects of play, including "deviant strategies" perhaps not in line with the intentions of the designers; and character--both players' identification with their characters and the game's culture of naming characters. The varied perspectives of the contributors--who come from such fields as game studies, textual analysis, gender studies, and postcolonial studies--reflect the breadth and vitality of current interest in MMOGs.Hilde G. Corneliussen and Jill Walker Rettberg are both Associate Professors of Humanistic Informatics at the University of Bergen, Norway.

Computer Games and New Media Cultures

In H. G. Corneliussen & J. W. Rettberg (Eds.), Digital culture, play and identity: A World of Warcraft reader (pp. 1–15). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Ducheneaut, N., Yee, N., Nickell, E., & Moore, R. J. (2006). Building an MMO with mass ...

Computer Games and New Media Cultures

Digital gaming is today a significant economic phenomenon as well as being an intrinsic part of a convergent media culture in postmodern societies. Its ubiquity, as well as the sheer volume of hours young people spend gaming, should make it ripe for urgent academic enquiry, yet the subject was a research backwater until the turn of the millennium. Even today, as tens of millions of young people spend their waking hours manipulating avatars and gaming characters on computer screens, the subject is still treated with scepticism in some academic circles. This handbook aims to reflect the relevance and value of studying digital games, now the subject of a growing number of studies, surveys, conferences and publications. As an overview of the current state of research into digital gaming, the 42 papers included in this handbook focus on the social and cultural relevance of gaming. In doing so, they provide an alternative perspective to one-dimensional studies of gaming, whose agendas do not include cultural factors. The contributions, which range from theoretical approaches to empirical studies, cover various topics including analyses of games themselves, the player-game interaction, and the social context of gaming. In addition, the educational aspects of games and gaming are treated in a discrete section. With material on non-commercial gaming trends such as ‘modding’, and a multinational group of authors from eleven nations, the handbook is a vital publication demonstrating that new media cultures are far more complex and diverse than commonly assumed in a debate dominated by concerns over violent content.

Digital Spirits in Religion and Media

In Digital, Culture, Play, and Identity: A World of Warcraft Reader, edited by Hilde G. Corneliussen and Jill Walker Rettberg, 39–62. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. MacCallum-Stewart, Esther and Justin Parsler. 2008. “Role-play vs.

Digital Spirits in Religion and Media

In many contemporary and popular forms of religious practice, digital technology and the spiritual are inseparable. Ranging from streaming broadcasts of spiritual possessions to screenings of mass prayer conferences in stadiums, spirits and divinities now have new forms in which they can materialise. By offering the notion of ‘digital spirits’, this book critically attends to the intersections of digital media and spiritual beings. It also puts forward a new performative perspective on how they interact. Taking cues from the work of Stewart Hoover and Heidi Campbell, among others, the book begins with an outline of the current debates around religion, performance and digital media. It then moves on to examine how mediality and religion, where embodied practices are carried out alongside virtual practices, work together in contemporary Asia. These case studies focus on lived religious practices in combination with various forms of media, and so help demonstrate that digital technology in particular reveals the layered processes of spirituality in practice. Gods and divinities have always relied on media to manifest, and this book is a fascinating exploration of how digital media has continued that tradition and taken it in new directions. As such, it will be of great interest to scholars of religious studies, digital media and performance studies.

The Warcraft Civilization

Jill Walker Rettberg, “Quests in World of Warcraft: Deferral and Repetition,” in Digital Culture, Play, and Identity: A World of Warcraft Reader, edited by Hilde G. Corneliussen and Jill Walker Rettberg (Cambridge, Mass.

The Warcraft Civilization

An exploration of the popular online role-playing game World of Warcraft as a virtual prototype of the real human future. World of Warcraft is more than a game. There is no ultimate goal, no winning hand, no princess to be rescued. WoW is an immersive virtual world in which characters must cope in a dangerous environment, assume identities, struggle to understand and communicate, learn to use technology, and compete for dwindling resources. Beyond the fantasy and science fiction details, as many have noted, it's not entirely unlike today's world. In The Warcraft Civilization, sociologist William Sims Bainbridge goes further, arguing that WoW can be seen not only as an allegory of today but also as a virtual prototype of tomorrow, of a real human future in which tribe-like groups will engage in combat over declining natural resources, build temporary alliances on the basis of mutual self-interest, and seek a set of values that transcend the need for war. What makes WoW an especially good place to look for insights about Western civilization, Bainbridge says, is that it bridges past and future. It is founded on Western cultural tradition, yet aimed toward the virtual worlds we could create in times to come.

Digital Leisure the Internet and Popular Culture

Corneliussen, H. and Rettberg, J. W. (eds) (2008) Digital Culture, Play, and Identity: A World of Warcraft Reader (Cambridge: MIT Press). Cotte, J. (1997) 'Chances, Trances and Lots of Slots: Gambling Motives and Consumption ...

Digital Leisure  the Internet and Popular Culture

Spracklen explores the impact of the internet on leisure and leisure studies, examining the ways in which digital leisure spaces and activities have become part of everyday leisure. Covering a range of issues from social media and file-sharing to romance on the Internet, this book presents new theoretical directions for digital leisure.

Play Creativity and Digital Cultures

Part I, Commodified Contexts of Digital Culture, analyses processes of production, looking specifically at the links ... use the Internet to play out a range of identities, to experiment with ideas and to make connections with others.

Play  Creativity and Digital Cultures

Recent work on children's digital cultures has identified a range of literacies emerging through children's engagement with new media technologies. This edited collection focuses on children's digital cultures, specifically examining the role of play and creativity in learning with these new technologies. The chapters in this book were contributed by an international range of respected researchers, who seek to extend our understandings of children's interactions with new media, both within and outside of school. They address and provide evidence for continuing debates around the following questions: What notions of creativity are useful in our fields? How does an understanding of play inform analysis of children's engagement with digital cultures? How might school practice take account of out-of-school learning in relation to digital cultures? How can we understand children's engagements with digital technologies in commercialized spaces? Offering current research, theoretical debate and empirical studies, this intriguing text will challenge the thinking of scholars and teachers alike as it explores the evolving nature of play within the media landscape of the twenty-first century.

Playful identities

the ludification of digital media cultures Valerie Frissen, Joost Raessens, Jos de Mul, Sybille Lammes, Michiel de Lange ... In Changing Views – Worlds in Play: Proceedings of the second international conference of DiGRA, eds.

Playful identities

In this edited volume, eighteen scholars examine the increasing role of digital media technologies in identity construction through play. Going beyond computer games, this interdisciplinary collection argues that present-day play and games are not only appropriate metaphors for capturing postmodern human identities, but are in fact the means by which people create their identity. From discussions of World of Warcraft and Foursquare to digital cartographies, the combined essays form a groundbreaking volume that features the most recent insights in play and game studies, media research, and identity studies.

Dungeons Dragons and Digital Denizens

NewYork: Routledge. Hagström, Charlotte. 2008. 'Playing with Names: Gaming and Naming in World of Warcraft.' In Digital Culture, Play and Identity: A World of Warcraft Reader, ed. Hilde G. Corneliussen and Jill Walker Rettberg, 265–85.

Dungeons  Dragons  and Digital Denizens

Dungeons, Dragons, and Digital Denizens is a collection of scholarly essays that seeks to represent the far-reaching scope and implications of digital role-playing games as both cultural and academic artifacts. As a genre, digital role playing games have undergone constant and radical revision, pushing not only multiple boundaries of game development, but also the playing strategies and experiences of players. Divided into three distinct sections, this premiere volume captures the distinctiveness of different game types, the forms of play they engender and their social and cultural implications. Contributors examine a range of games, from classics like Final Fantasy to blockbusters like World of Warcraft to obscure genre bending titles like Lux Pain. Working from a broad range of disciplines such as ecocritism, rhetoric, performance, gender, and communication, these essays yield insights that enrich the field of game studies and further illuminate the cultural, psychological and philosophical implications of a society that increasingly produces, plays and discourses about role playing games.

The Johns Hopkins Guide to Digital Media

“ In t Digital Culture, Play and Identity: A World of Warcraft Reader, edited by Hilde Corneliussen and Jill Walker, r 111–122. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Bartle, Richard. 2003. Designing Virtual Worlds. Indianapolis: New Riders.

The Johns Hopkins Guide to Digital Media

The study of what is collectively labeled “New Media”—the cultural and artistic practices made possible by digital technology—has become one of the most vibrant areas of scholarly activity and is rapidly turning into an established academic field, with many universities now offering it as a major. The Johns Hopkins Guide to Digital Media is the first comprehensive reference work to which teachers, students, and the curious can quickly turn for reliable information on the key terms and concepts of the field. The contributors present entries on nearly 150 ideas, genres, and theoretical concepts that have allowed digital media to produce some of the most innovative intellectual, artistic, and social practices of our time. The result is an easy-to-consult reference for digital media scholars or anyone wishing to become familiar with this fast-developing field.

Utopic Dreams and Apocalyptic Fantasies

Pierre Bourdieu, “The Scholastic Point of View,” Cultural Anthropology 5, no. 4 (1990), 380–91. 66. Hilde G. Corneliussen and Jill Walker Rettberg, eds., Digital Culture, Play and Identity: A World ofWarcraft Reader (Cambridge, Mass.

Utopic Dreams and Apocalyptic Fantasies

Utopic Dreams and Apocalyptic Fantasies invites us to examine critical questions about video game play, pleasure, and fantasy from a sociological perspective.

Gender and Sexuality in Online Game Cultures

Passionate Play Jenny Sundén, Malin Sveningsson ... “Play Globally, Act Locally: The Standardization of Pro Halo 3 Gaming. ... In Digital Culture, Play and Identity, edited by Hilde G.Corneliussen, andJill WalkerRettberg, ...

Gender and Sexuality in Online Game Cultures

How do gender and sexuality come to matter in online game cultures? Why is it important to explore "straight" versus "queer" contexts of play? And what does it mean to play together with others over time, as co-players and researchers? Gender and Sexuality in Online Game Cultures is a book about female players and their passionate encounters with the online game World of Warcraft and its player cultures. It takes seriously women’s passions in games, and as such draws attention to questions of pleasure in and desire for technology. The authors use a unique approach of what they term a "twin ethnography" that develops two parallel stories. Sveningsson studies "straight" game culture, and makes explicit that which is of the norm by exploring the experiences of female gamers in a male-dominated gaming context. Sundén investigates "queer" game culture through the queer potentials of mainstream World of Warcraft culture, as well as through the case of a guild explicitly defined as LGBT. Academic research on game culture is flourishing, yet feminist accounts of gender and sexuality in games are still in the making. Drawing on feminist notions of performance, performativity and positionality, as well as the recent turn to affect and phenomenology within cultural theory, the authors develop queer, feminist studies of online player cultures in ways that are situated and embodied.

International Handbook of Internet Research

In H. Corneliussen & J. Walker (Eds.), Digital culture, play and identity – A world of warcraft reader (pp. 111–122). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Bartle, R. (2003). Designing virtual worlds. Indianapolis, IN: New Riders.

International Handbook of Internet Research

Internet research spans many disciplines. From the computer or information s- ences, through engineering, and to social sciences, humanities and the arts, almost all of our disciplines have made contributions to internet research, whether in the effort to understand the effect of the internet on their area of study, or to investigate the social and political changes related to the internet, or to design and develop so- ware and hardware for the network. The possibility and extent of contributions of internet research vary across disciplines, as do the purposes, methods, and outcomes. Even the epistemological underpinnings differ widely. The internet, then, does not have a discipline of study for itself: It is a ?eld for research (Baym, 2005), an open environment that simultaneously supports many approaches and techniques not otherwise commensurable with each other. There are, of course, some inhibitions that limit explorations in this ?eld: research ethics, disciplinary conventions, local and national norms, customs, laws, borders, and so on. Yet these limits on the int- net as a ?eld for research have not prevented the rapid expansion and exploration of the internet. After nearly two decades of research and scholarship, the limits are a positive contribution, providing bases for discussion and interrogation of the contexts of our research, making internet research better for all. These ‘limits,’ challenges that constrain the theoretically limitless space for internet research, create boundaries that give de?nition to the ?eld and provide us with a particular topography that enables research and investigation.

Videogame Cultures and the Future of Interactive Entertainment

10E Aarseth 'A Hollow World: World of Warcraft as Spatial Practice', Digital Culture, Play and Identity: A World of Warcraft Reader, H Corneliussen, et. al. (eds), MIT Press, Cambridge, 2008, pp 111-122. 11A Ruch, loc. cit.

Videogame Cultures and the Future of Interactive Entertainment


Battlefields of Negotiation

Digital culture, play, and identity: A World ofWarcraft reader, 39-62. Cambridge: The MIT Press. — (2011). Conflict thought communities and textual appropriation in MMORPGs. In G. Crawford, V. K. Gosling 8: B. Light (eds.) ...

Battlefields of Negotiation

The massively multiplayer online role-playing game 'World of Warcraft' has become one of the most popular computer games of the past decade, introducing millions around the world to community-based play. Within the boundaries set by its design, the game encourages players to appropriate and shape the game to their own wishes, resulting in highly diverse forms of play and participation. This illuminating study frames 'World of Warcraft' as a complex socio-cultural phenomenon defined by and evolving as a result of the negotiations between groups of players as well as the game's owners, throwing new light on complex consumer- producer relationships in the increasingly participatory but still tightly controlled media of online games.

Digital Gaming Re imagines the Middle Ages

Medieval Identity Machines. Kindle Edition. ... In Profiles ofPopular Culture: A Reader, edited by Ray B. Browne, 277–84. ... In Digital Culture, Play, and Identity, edited by Hilde G. Corneliussen and Jill Walker Rettberg, 63–87.

Digital Gaming Re imagines the Middle Ages

Digital gaming’s cultural significance is often minimized much in the same way that the Middle Ages are discounted as the backward and childish precursor to the modern period. Digital Gaming Reimagines the Middle Ages challenges both perceptions by examining how the Middle Ages have persisted into the contemporary world via digital games as well as analyzing how digital gaming translates, adapts, and remediates medieval stories, themes, characters, and tropes in interactive electronic environments. At the same time, the Middle Ages are reinterpreted according to contemporary concerns and conflicts, in all their complexity. Rather than a distinct time in the past, the Middle Ages form a space in which theory and narrative, gaming and textuality, identity and society are remediated and reimagined. Together, the essays demonstrate that while having its roots firmly in narrative traditions, neomedieval gaming—where neomedievalism no longer negotiates with any reality beyond itself and other medievalisms—creates cultural palimpsests, multiply-layered trans-temporal artifacts. Digital Gaming Re-imagines the Middle Ages demonstrates that the medieval is more than just a stockpile of historically static facts but is a living, subversive presence in contemporary culture.

Handbook of Research on Technoself Identity in a Technological Society

Digital culture, play, and identity: A World of Warcraft reader. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Gee, J. P. (2007). Whatvideo games have to teach us about learning and literacy. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan. doi:10.1145/950566.950595 ...

Handbook of Research on Technoself  Identity in a Technological Society

"This book provides insights to better enhance the understanding of technology's widespread intertwinement with human identity within an advancing technological society"--Provided by publisher.

The Dark Side of Game Play

In Digital Culture, Play and Identity, edited by Hilde G. Corneliussen and Jill Walker Rettberg, 143–66. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Lin, Holin and Sun, Chuen-Tsai. 2007. “'White-Eyed' and 'Griefer' Player Culture: Deviance Construction ...

The Dark Side of Game Play

Games allow players to experiment and play with subject positions, values and moral choice. In game worlds players can take on the role of antagonists; they allow us to play with behaviour that would be offensive, illegal or immoral if it happened outside of the game sphere. While contemporary games have always handled certain problematic topics, such as war, disasters, human decay, post-apocalyptic futures, cruelty and betrayal, lately even the most playful of genres are introducing situations in which players are presented with difficult ethical and moral dilemmas. This volume is an investigation of "dark play" in video games, or game play with controversial themes as well as controversial play behaviour. It covers such questions as: Why do some games stir up political controversies? How do games invite, or even push players towards dark play through their design? Where are the boundaries for what can be presented in a games? Are these boundaries different from other media such as film and books, and if so why? What is the allure of dark play and why do players engage in these practices?

Encyclopedia of Video Games The Culture Technology and Art of Gaming 2nd Edition 3 volumes

Karin Wenz See also: Deludic Play; Failure Further Reading Arnold, Michael, Martin Gibbs, Tamara Kohn, James Meese, ... In Digital Culture, Play, and Identity: A World of Warcraft Reader, edited by Hilde G. Corneliussen and Jill Walker ...

Encyclopedia of Video Games  The Culture  Technology  and Art of Gaming  2nd Edition  3 volumes

Now in its second edition, the Encyclopedia of Video Games: The Culture, Technology, and Art of Gaming is the definitive, go-to resource for anyone interested in the diverse and expanding video game industry. This three-volume encyclopedia covers all things video games, including the games themselves, the companies that make them, and the people who play them. Written by scholars who are exceptionally knowledgeable in the field of video game studies, it notes genres, institutions, important concepts, theoretical concerns, and more and is the most comprehensive encyclopedia of video games of its kind, covering video games throughout all periods of their existence and geographically around the world. This is the second edition of Encyclopedia of Video Games: The Culture, Technology, and Art of Gaming, originally published in 2012. All of the entries have been revised to accommodate changes in the industry, and an additional volume has been added to address the recent developments, advances, and changes that have occurred in this ever-evolving field. This set is a vital resource for scholars and video game aficionados alike. Explores games, people, events, and ideas that are influential in the industry, rather than simply discussing the history of video games Offers a detailed understanding of the variety of video games that have been created over the years Includes contributions from some of the most important scholars of video games Suggests areas of further exploration for students of video games

Queerness in Play

In Digital Culture, Play, and Identity: A World of Warcraft Reader, ed. Hilde Corneliussen and Jill Walker Rettberg, 203–224. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Murray, Janet H. 2006. Toward a Cultural Theory of Gaming: Digital Games & the ...

Queerness in Play

Queerness in Play examines the many ways queerness of all kinds—from queer as ‘LGBT’ to other, less well-covered aspects of the queer spectrum—intersects with games and the social contexts of play. The current unprecedented visibility of queer creators and content comes at a high tide of resistance to the inclusion of those outside a long-imagined cisgender, heterosexual, white male norm. By critically engaging the ways games—as a culture, an industry, and a medium—help reproduce limiting binary formations of gender and sexuality, Queerness in Play contributes to the growing body of scholarship promoting more inclusive understandings of identity, sexuality, and games.

Narrative in Performance

Corneliussen, H. and Rettberg, J. W. (Eds) (2008) Digital Culture, Play, and Identity: A World of Warcraft Reader (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press). joeyboy680 (2011) Blizzcon 2011 Dance Contest – Tauren Female 2, ...

Narrative in Performance

A far-reaching and engaging overview of the role of narrative in dance and theatre performance, bringing together chapters written by an international range of scholars and subsequently creating a critical dialogue for approaching this fundamental topic within performance studies. Drawing on historical and contemporary examples of a variety of different performance genres, the book will provide a method for exploring the context of a particular form or artist and enhance students' ability to critically reflect on performance.