Digital Culture

This book offers a new perspective on digital culture by examining its development, and reveals that, despite appearances, it is neither radically new, nor ultimately technologically driven.

Digital Culture

During the last twenty years, digital technology has begun to touch on almost every aspect of our lives. Nowadays most forms of mass media, television, recorded music and film are produced and even distributed digitally; and these media are beginning to converge with digital forms, such as the internet, the World Wide Web, and video games, to produce a seamless digital mediascape. At work we are surrounded by technology, whether in offices or in supermarkets and factories, where almost every aspect of planning, design, marketing, production and distribution is monitored or controlled digitally. In Digital Culture Charlie Gere articulates the degree to which our everyday lives are becoming dominated by digital technology, whether in terms of leisure, work or bureaucracy. This dominance is reflected in other areas, including the worlds of finance, technology, scientific research, media and telecommunications. Out of this situation a particular set of cultural responses has emerged, for example, in art, music, design, film, literature and elsewhere. This book offers a new perspective on digital culture by examining its development, and reveals that, despite appearances, it is neither radically new, nor ultimately technologically driven. The author traces its roots to the late 18th century, and shows how it sprang from a number of impulses, including the information needs of industrial capitalism and contemporary warfare, avant-garde artistic practice, counter-cultural experimentation, radical philosophy and sub-cultural style. It is these conditions that produced both digital technology and digital culture, and which have determined how they develop.

The Photographic Image in Digital Culture

It is also the case that the signifying powers of the photographic images carried
on digital media, the ideological frameworks in which multimedia texts are built,
and ... They are being built in negotiation with the forms of a photographic culture.

The Photographic Image in Digital Culture

What does a new technology of images mean for the ways in which we encounter and use images in everyday life: in advertising, entertainment, news, evidence? And within our domestic and private worlds for our sense of self and indentity; our view of the body and our sexuality? The Photographic Image in Digital Culture explores the technological transformation of the image and its implications for photography. Contributors investigate such issues as the relationship of technological change to visual culture; the new discourses of `techno-culture'; medicine's new vision of the body, and interactive pornography. They also examine the cultural meanings of new surveillance images; shifts in the domestic consumption of images and their relationship to memory, history and biography; the social uses of video and computer games and the changing role of photography as document and as art.

Digital Culture Play and Identity

Digital Culture  Play  and Identity

World of Warcraft is the world's most popular massively multiplayer online game (MMOG), with (as of March 2007) more than eight million active subscribers across Europe, North America, Asia, and Australia, who play the game an astonishing average of twenty hours a week. This book examines the complexity of World of Warcraft from a variety of perspectives, exploring the cultural and social implications of the proliferation of ever more complex digital gameworlds. The contributors have immersed themselves in the World of Warcraft universe, spending hundreds of hours as players (leading guilds and raids, exploring moneymaking possibilities in the in-game auction house, playing different factions, races, and classes), conducting interviews, and studying the game design--as created by Blizzard Entertainment, the game's developer, and as modified by player-created user interfaces. The analyses they offer are based on both the firsthand experience of being a resident of Azeroth and the data they have gathered and interpreted. The contributors examine the ways that gameworlds reflect the real world--exploring such topics as World of Warcraft as a "capitalist fairytale" and the game's construction of gender; the cohesiveness of the gameworld in terms of geography, mythology, narrative, and the treatment of death as a temporary state; aspects of play, including "deviant strategies" perhaps not in line with the intentions of the designers; and character--both players' identification with their characters and the game's culture of naming characters. The varied perspectives of the contributors--who come from such fields as game studies, textual analysis, gender studies, and postcolonial studies--reflect the breadth and vitality of current interest in MMOGs.Hilde G. Corneliussen and Jill Walker Rettberg are both Associate Professors of Humanistic Informatics at the University of Bergen, Norway.

Digital Culture

They are the dispersal of digital media – from computers to cell phones to digital
television to the Internet – and the convergence of formerly separate media
brought about by the digital revolution. Both of these are important factors in the ...

Digital Culture

Everything you need to know about new media in one accessible, easy to navigate volume! From Facebookto the iPhone, from YouTubeto Wikipedia, from Grand Theft Autoto Second Life- this book explores new media's most important issues and debates in an accessible and engaging text for newcomers to the field. With technological change continuing to unfold at an incredible rate, Digital Culturesrounds-up major events in the media's recent past to help develop a clear understanding of the theoretical and practical debates that surround this emerging discipline. It addresses issues such as: What is new media? How is new media changing our lives? Is new media having a positive or negative effect on culture and human communication? Each chapter contains case studies which provide an interesting and lively balance between the well-trodden and the newly emerging themes in the field. Topics covered include digital television, digital cinema, gaming, digital democracy, mobile phones, the World Wide Web, digital news, online social networking, music and multimedia, virtual communities and the digital divide. Digital Culturesis an essential introductory guide for all media and communication studies students, as well as those with a general interest in new media and its impact on the world around us.

Understanding Digital Culture

In order to fully understand the digital culture, it is important to examine not only
the economic and social impacts of an 'information society', but to examine these
alongside the shifting and emerging cultural forms that are already playing an ...

Understanding Digital Culture

From profiling databases and mashups to cybersex and the truth about social networking, Miller's insightful second edition traces the pervasive influence of 'digital culture' throughout contemporary life. He integrates socio-economic understandings of the 'information society' with the cultural studies approach to production, use, and consumption of digital media and multimedia. Still refreshingly readable and packed with new examples; Understanding Digital Culture: Includes new and updated material on work and commodity production in digital capitalism, "slacktivism", industrial espionage and major bank hacks, the rise of mobile dating apps, and cyber-bullying alongside trolling. Unpacks how the information society is transforming and challenging traditional notions of crime, resistance, war and protest, community, intimacy and belonging. Crosses disciplines to give a balanced account of the social, economic and cultural dimensions of the information society. Illuminates the increasing importance of mobile, wireless and converged media technologies in everyday life. Charts the changing cultural forms associated with new media and its consumption, including music, gaming, microblogging and online identity. Illustrates the above through a series of contemporary, in-depth case studies of digital culture. This is the perfect text for students looking for a full account of the information society, virtual cultures, sociology of the Internet and new media.

Building Digital Culture

Throughout the digital culture framework we looked at the various aspects of
going through a digital transformation process, but it is important to remember
that the process is different in every organization. You will not actually fully map
out the ...

Building Digital Culture

Building Digital Culture aims to answer a simple question: How can organisations succeed when the environment they operate in is changing so quickly? The last thing businesses need today is a digital strategy. Instead, their strategy needs to be fit for our fast-changing digital world, where businesses have more data than they know what to do with, a media landscape that's exploded in size and complexity, the risk of a new disruption around every corner, and only one certainty: that this change won't let up. Building Digital Culture doesn't address whether or not you should advertise on Facebook or invest in virtual reality. It doesn't seek to unearth a silver bullet to make digital investments a sure-thing. It steps back from the hype, and argues that whatever digital might mean for your business, if you don't create a digital culture you'll most likely fail, or at least fall short of what you want to achieve. Daniel Rowles and Thomas Brown combine more than 30 years of experience at the forefront of marketing and digital developments to help you to navigate from being a business that tolerates or acts digital, to one that truly is digital. Building Digital Culture is based on more than 200 hours of research, candid interviews and contributions from senior leaders at a diverse range of brands including Twitter, Made.com, Deloitte, HSBC, Ladbrokes, Direct Line Group, Barclays, The Metropolitan Police, RSA Insurance and many more.

Self Representation and Digital Culture

29–30) Moreover, digital technology includes, butisnot limited to, the internet,
shaping production and consumption of images, texts and sounds across culture,
as many scholars have pointed out. This is not to suggest that, for example, ...

Self Representation and Digital Culture

Taking a close look at ordinary people 'telling their own story', Nancy Thumim explores self-representations in contemporary digital culture in settings as diverse as reality TV, online storytelling, and oral histories displayed in museums.

Visual Digital Culture

I now embark upon a consideration of the forms and genres of visual digital
culture introduced above, from two quite different historical perspectives. Chapter
3 will concern itself with the particular character of contemporary aesthetics, ...

Visual Digital Culture

Digital entertainment, from video games to simulation rides, is now a central feature of popular culture. Computer-based or digital technologies are supplanting the traditional production methods of television, film and video, provoking intense speculation about their impact on the character of art. Examining the digital imaging techniques across a wide range of media, including film, music video, computer games, theme parks and simulation rides, Visual Digital Culture explores the relationship between evolving digital technologies and existing media and considers the effect of these new image forms on the experience of visual culture. Andrew Darley first traces the development of digital computing from the 1960s and its use in the production of visual digital entertainment. Through case studies of films such as Toy Story, key pop videos such as Michael Jackson's Black or White, and computer games like Quake and Blade Runner, Andrew Darley asks whether digital visual forms mark a break with traditional emphases on story, representation, meaning and reading towards a focus on style, image performance and sensation. He questions the implications of digital culture for theories of spectatorship, suggesting that these new visual forms create new forms of spectatorship within mass culture.

Digital Culture Industry

However, now artists areconfronted withthenew cultural gatekeeper, thedigital
vendor.As such this section is primarily concerned with digital vendors, the
intermediaries who distributeand selltherights holders'IP, theretail outlets ofthe
digital ...

Digital Culture Industry

How did digital media happen ? Through a unique approach to digital documents, and detailed intricate histories of illicit internet piracy networks, The Digital Culture Industry goes beyond the Napster creation myth and illuminates the unseen individuals, code and events behind the turn to digital media.

Examining Paratextual Theory and its Applications in Digital Culture

The chapters in this collective work cover topics of interestin bibliometrics,
communications studies, cultural studies, digital ... In truth, we think the
expression “digital culture” is bound to fade as a more commonsensical lexicon
takes shape; this ...

Examining Paratextual Theory and its Applications in Digital Culture

The paratext framework is now used in a variety of fields to assess, measure, analyze, and comprehend the elements that provide thresholds, allowing scholars to better understand digital objects. Researchers from many disciplines revisit paratextual theories in order to grasp what surrounds text in the digital age. Examining Paratextual Theory and its Applications in Digital Culture suggests a theoretical and practical tool for building bridges between disciplines interested in conducting joint research and exploration of digital culture. Helping scholars from different fields find an interdisciplinary framework and common language to study digital objects, this book serves as a useful reference for academics, librarians, professionals, researchers, and students, offering a collaborative outlook and perspective.

Digital Culture and E Tourism Technologies Applications and Management Approaches

Deployment of ICTs in museums/cultural centres, policy issues, integration issues
, extensibility, interoperability Digital Culture and Electronic Tourism: The
Theories • Sociological/economic theories and models • Content vs community ...

Digital Culture and E Tourism  Technologies  Applications and Management Approaches

"This edition fosters multidisciplinary discussion and research on the adoption of information and communication technologies (ICT) in the contexts of culture and tourism, investigating how emerging technologies and new managerial models and strategies can promote sustainable development for culture and tourism"--Provided by publisher.

Cinematic Perspectives on Digital Culture

She personifies theaffectthat harks backtothe birthof cinema in the star system,
and atthesame timeher level of integrationwith the apparatus prefigures the
avatar of digital culture, wherethe same elements of celebrity construction are
evident.

Cinematic Perspectives on Digital Culture

Exploring research into mobile phone use as props to subjective identity, Norman Taylor employs concepts from Michelle Foucault, Gilles Deleuze and actor network theory to discuss the affect of mechanisms of make-believe, from celebrity culture to avatar-obsessed game players, and digital culture.

Memes in Digital Culture

WHEN MEMES GO DIGITAL The uptick in vibrant popular discourse about
memes in an era increasingly defined by digital communication is not
coincidental . Although the term “ meme ” was coined long before the digital era ,
the Internet's ...

Memes in Digital Culture

Taking “Gangnam Style” seriously: what Internet memes can tell us about digital culture. In December 2012, the exuberant video “Gangnam Style” became the first YouTube clip to be viewed more than one billion times. Thousands of its viewers responded by creating and posting their own variations of the video—“Mitt Romney Style,” “NASA Johnson Style,” “Egyptian Style,” and many others. “Gangnam Style” (and its attendant parodies, imitations, and derivations) is one of the most famous examples of an Internet meme: a piece of digital content that spreads quickly around the web in various iterations and becomes a shared cultural experience. In this book, Limor Shifman investigates Internet memes and what they tell us about digital culture. Shifman discusses a series of well-known Internet memes—including “Leave Britney Alone,” the pepper-spraying cop, LOLCats, Scumbag Steve, and Occupy Wall Street's “We Are the 99 Percent.” She offers a novel definition of Internet memes: digital content units with common characteristics, created with awareness of each other, and circulated, imitated, and transformed via the Internet by many users. She differentiates memes from virals; analyzes what makes memes and virals successful; describes popular meme genres; discusses memes as new modes of political participation in democratic and nondemocratic regimes; and examines memes as agents of globalization. Memes, Shifman argues, encapsulate some of the most fundamental aspects of the Internet in general and of the participatory Web 2.0 culture in particular. Internet memes may be entertaining, but in this book Limor Shifman makes a compelling argument for taking them seriously.

Community without Community in Digital Culture

Chapter 2, 'The Theological Origins ofthe Digital', starts with thepremise that
thereisadirect connection betweenthe emergence of digital technology andthe
rise of our 'digital culture' on theone hand, and contemporary nihilism onthe other
, ...

Community without Community in Digital Culture

Community Without Community in Digital Culture presents the view that our digital culture is determined not by greater connection, but by the separation and gap that is a necessary concomitant of our fundamental technicity.

Digital Culture Unplugged

First published in 2007. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Digital Culture Unplugged

First published in 2007. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Activism and Digital Culture in Australia

Looks at digital culture and activist campaigns within Australia and the Asia Pacific region as well as how digital culture facilitates public participation and deliberation using an interdisciplinary approach.

Activism and Digital Culture in Australia

Looks at digital culture and activist campaigns within Australia and the Asia Pacific region as well as how digital culture facilitates public participation and deliberation using an interdisciplinary approach.

The Quirks of Digital Culture

This book explores the quirks of digital culture. Through a series of short punchy chapters, it uses these quirks as momentary glimpses into the hidden dynamics of our swirling, highly mediated and often unfathomable cultural experiences.

The Quirks of Digital Culture

This book explores the quirks of digital culture. Through a series of short punchy chapters, it uses these quirks as momentary glimpses into the hidden dynamics of our swirling, highly mediated and often unfathomable cultural experiences.

Geographies of Digital Culture

This book draws attention to the deep interconnectedness of the cultural, digital, and spatial aspects of everyday practices by referring to a broad range of empirical examples taken from tourism, banking, mobility, and health.

Geographies of Digital Culture

"Digital culture" reflects the ways in which the ubiquity and increasing use of digital devices and infrastructures is changing the arenas of human experience, creating new cultural realities. Whereas much of the existing literature on digital culture addresses the topic through a sociological, anthropological, or media theoretic lens, this book focuses on its geographic aspects. The first section, "infrastructures and networked practices" highlights the integration of digital technologies into everyday practices in very different historical and geographical contexts--ranging from local lifeworlds, urban environments, web cartographies up to global geopolitics. The second section on "subjectivities and identities" shows how digital technology use possesses the capacity to alter the subjective, perceptive, and affective engagement with the spatial world. Finally, "politics and inequalities" investigates the social and spatial disparities concerning digital technology and its use. This book draws attention to the deep interconnectedness of the cultural, digital, and spatial aspects of everyday practices by referring to a broad range of empirical examples taken from tourism, banking, mobility, and health. Scholars in human geography, anthropology, media and communication studies, and history will find this research indispensable reading. It addresses both young and seasoned researchers as well as advanced students in the aforementioned disciplines. The wealth of examples also makes this publication helpful in academic teaching.

Museums and Digital Culture

This book explores how digital culture is transforming museums in the 21st century.

Museums and Digital Culture

This book explores how digital culture is transforming museums in the 21st century. Offering a corpus of new evidence for readers to explore, the authors trace the digital evolution of the museum and that of their audiences, now fully immersed in digital life, from the Internet to home and work. In a world where life in code and digits has redefined human information behavior and dominates daily activity and communication, ubiquitous use of digital tools and technology is radically changing the social contexts and purposes of museum exhibitions and collections, the work of museum professionals and the expectations of visitors, real and virtual. Moving beyond their walls, with local and global communities, museums are evolving into highly dynamic, socially aware and relevant institutions as their connections to the global digital ecosystem are strengthened. As they adopt a visitor-centered model and design visitor experiences, their priorities shift to engage audiences, convey digital collections, and tell stories through exhibitions. This is all part of crafting a dynamic and innovative museum identity of the future, made whole by seamless integration with digital culture, digital thinking, aesthetics, seeing and hearing, where visitors are welcomed participants. The international and interdisciplinary chapter contributors include digital artists, academics, and museum professionals. In themed parts the chapters present varied evidence-based research and case studies on museum theory, philosophy, collections, exhibitions, libraries, digital art and digital future, to bring new insights and perspectives, designed to inspire readers. Enjoy the journey!