Digital Technology and Democratic Theory

To answer, this volume broaches the most pressing technological changes and issues facing democracy as a philosophy and an institution.

Digital Technology and Democratic Theory

One of the most far-reaching transformations in our era is the wave of digital technologies rolling over—and upending—nearly every aspect of life. Work and leisure, family and friendship, community and citizenship have all been modified by now-ubiquitous digital tools and platforms. Digital Technology and Democratic Theory looks closely at one significant facet of our rapidly evolving digital lives: how technology is radically changing our lives as citizens and participants in democratic governments. To understand these transformations, this book brings together contributions by scholars from multiple disciplines to wrestle with the question of how digital technologies shape, reshape, and affect fundamental questions about democracy and democratic theory. As expectations have whiplashed—from Twitter optimism in the wake of the Arab Spring to Facebook pessimism in the wake of the 2016 US election—the time is ripe for a more sober and long-term assessment. How should we take stock of digital technologies and their promise and peril for reshaping democratic societies and institutions? To answer, this volume broaches the most pressing technological changes and issues facing democracy as a philosophy and an institution.

Democracy in the digital world

In the first book of the Digital Democracy series, Professor Wilson Gomes draws on ten years of research on the subject to present a historical cross section of the idea of electronic and digital democracy, addressing themes such as ...

Democracy in the digital world

In times of crisis of representation the question of what kind of democracy can be achieved through the expansion of new technologies emerges with renewed vigor. Is it direct democracy or yet another appendage of representative democracy? Is it democracy as understood by classical liberals, libertarians or communitarians? Is it deliberative or participatory electronic democracy? In the first book of the Digital Democracy series, Professor Wilson Gomes draws on ten years of research on the subject to present a historical cross section of the idea of electronic and digital democracy, addressing themes such as transparency, public sphere, participation and political deliberation. PhD in Philosophy and coordinator of the Center for Advanced Studies in Digital Democracy of the Federal University of Bahia (Ufba), Gomes divides his book into three periods: "1970-1995 - The origins of the idea of electronic democracy – Teledemocracy"; "1996-2005 - The consolidation of the idea of digital democracy"; and "2006-2015 - The state of digital democracy". As Gomes summarizes: "The history of the idea that it was possible to improve democratic processes through information technology can naturally go a long way back, as the invention and, above all, the massification of new communication media have always been accompanied by renewed hopes for improvement in democracy and public life." Published exclusively in digital format, the Digital Democracy series is edited by the professor and sociologist Sergio Amadeu da Silveira.

Open Democracy

“Democratic Value and Money for Decentralized Digital Society.” Working paper presented at the Stanford Workshop on Digital Technology and Democratic Theory, June 27, 2018. Fralin, Richard. 1978. Rousseau and Representation: A Study of ...

Open Democracy

"To the Ancient Greeks, democracy meant gathering in a public space and arguing based on an agenda set by a randomly selected assembly of 500 other citizens. To the Icelandic Vikings in Northern Europe a few centuries later, it meant gathering every summer in a large field, a place where they held their own annual "parliament," and similarly talking things through until they got to relatively consensual decisions about the common's fate. Our contemporary representative democracies are very different. Modern Parliaments are intimidating buildings that are much harder to access for ordinary citizens-quite literally. They are typically gated and guarded, and it often feels as if only certain types of people-people with the right suit, accent, bank account, connections, even last names-are welcome to enter them. In Open Democracy, Landemore revitalizes the model of success from ancient open democracies alongside the problems of the present-day representative democracies in order to get to the heart of the issues which contemporary democratic societies are dealing with today. Something has been lost between the two, Landemore argues: accessibility; openness to the ordinary man and woman. Landemore believes the move to "representative" democracy, a mediated form of democracy seen as unavoidable in mass, commercial societies, also became a move towards democratic closure, and exclusivity. Open Democracy asks how can we recover the openness of ancient democracies in today's world, and would it help the crisis of democracy? In diagnosing what is wrong with representative democracy, Landemore offers a normative alternative and strategy-one that is more true to the democratic ideal of "government of the people, by the people, for the people." This alternative conception (open democracy) is one Landemore believes can be used to imagine and design more participatory, responsive, accountable, and smarter institutions, thereby strengthening our democracies along with on the whole, our societies"--

Open Democracy

“Democratic Value and Money for Decentralized Digital Society.” Working paper presented at the Stanford Workshop on Digital Technology and Democratic Theory, June 27, 2018. Fralin, Richard. 1978. Rousseau and Representation: A Study of ...

Open Democracy

"Open Democracy envisions what true government by mass leadership could look like."—Nathan Heller, New Yorker How a new model of democracy that opens up power to ordinary citizens could strengthen inclusiveness, responsiveness, and accountability in modern societies To the ancient Greeks, democracy meant gathering in public and debating laws set by a randomly selected assembly of several hundred citizens. To the Icelandic Vikings, democracy meant meeting every summer in a field to discuss issues until consensus was reached. Our contemporary representative democracies are very different. Modern parliaments are gated and guarded, and it seems as if only certain people—with the right suit, accent, wealth, and connections—are welcome. Diagnosing what is wrong with representative government and aiming to recover some of the lost openness of ancient democracies, Open Democracy presents a new paradigm of democracy in which power is genuinely accessible to ordinary citizens. Hélène Landemore favors the ideal of “representing and being represented in turn” over direct-democracy approaches. Supporting a fresh nonelectoral understanding of democratic representation, Landemore recommends centering political institutions around the “open mini-public”—a large, jury-like body of randomly selected citizens gathered to define laws and policies for the polity, in connection with the larger public. She also defends five institutional principles as the foundations of an open democracy: participatory rights, deliberation, the majoritarian principle, democratic representation, and transparency. Open Democracy demonstrates that placing ordinary citizens, rather than elites, at the heart of democratic power is not only the true meaning of a government of, by, and for the people, but also feasible and, today more than ever, urgently needed.

Power For All

95 See Cass R. Sunstein, #Republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University ... Cohen and Archon Fung, “Democracy and the Digital Public Sphere,” in Digital Technology and Democratic Theory, ed.

Power  For All

'A remarkably insightful read on what power is, how it's gained and lost, and how it can be used for good. The masterful analysis by two leading experts will make you rethink some of your most basic assumptions about influence' Adam Grant Power isn't just for the few at the top; it is potentially for everyone. You have power - and the power to use it. Power is one of the most misunderstood - and therefore vilified - concepts in our society. Most people assume power is predetermined by personality or wealth, or that it's gained by strong-arming others. Many write it off as inherently corrupt or 'dirty' and want nothing to do with it. But as pioneering researchers Julie Battilana and Tiziana Casciaro deftly show in Power, for All, power is the ability to influence someone else's behaviour. This influence is derived from having access to valued resources, which anyone can have, regardless of their income or status in life. Everyone has a resource to offer, so everyone has access to power. Battilana and Casciaro offer a timely, democratised vision of power. While hierarchies tend to stay in place because power is often sticky, by agitating, innovating and orchestrating change, they show how those with less power can challenge established structures to make them more balanced. They teach readers how to power-map their workplace to find who can create real change at work, plan for and cause sustaining power shifts, and understand the five motivations for seeking power - money and status, but also autonomy, achievement, affiliation and morality. They explore how these dynamics play out through vivid storytelling: as Donatella Versace successfully leads her brother's company after his death - despite having a title, but little influence; what social movements can learn from youth climate activists and how they can go farther; and how a manager can gain the trust of sceptical employees and improve the workplace. Ultimately, Power, for All demystifies the essential mechanisms for acquiring and using power for all people. Concentrated, accessible, and life-changing, Power, for All is the definitive guide to understanding and navigating power in our relationships, organisations and society.

The Tyranny of Generosity

Digital Technology and Democratic Theory. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2021. Bishop, Matthew, and Michael Green. Philanthrocapitalism: How Giving Can Save the World. New York: Bloomsbury Publishing, 2010.

The Tyranny of Generosity

The practice of philanthropy, which releases private property for public purposes, represents in many ways the best angels of our nature. But this practice's noteworthy virtues often obscure the fact that philanthropy also represents the exercise of private power. In The Tyranny of Generosity, Theodore Lechterman shows how this private power can threaten the foundations of a democratic society. The deployment of private wealth for public ends may rival the authority of communities to determine their own affairs. And, in societies characterized by wide disparities in wealth, philanthropy often combines with background inequalities to make public decisions overwhelmingly sensitive to the preferences of the rich. Allowing private wealth to dictate social outcomes collides with core commitments of a democratic society, a society in which people are supposed to determine their common affairs together, on equal terms. But why exactly is democracy valuable? How should these values be weighed against the liberty of donors and the many social benefits that philanthropy promises? Lechterman explores these questions by examining various topics in the practice of philanthropy: the respective roles of philanthropy and government, public subsidies for private giving, the use of donations for political speech, instruments of perpetual giving, the rise in giving by commercial corporations, and "effective altruism" as a guide for individual giving. These studies build to a surprising conclusion: realizing the democratic ideal may be impossible without philanthropy--but making philanthropy safe for democracy also requires fundamental changes to policy and practice.

After Democracy

Pablo J. Boczkowski and C. W. Anderson (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2017), 129–146; Ananny, “Presence of Absence: Exploring the Democratic Significance of Silence,” in Digital Technology and Democratic Theory, ed. Helene Landemore, Rob Reich, ...

After Democracy

What do ordinary citizens really want from their governments?

Politics Democracy and E Government Participation and Service Delivery

democratic theory 201, 208 democratic values and mechanisms 58, 74 democratization of service provision 215, 216, 218, ... 43 different democracy theories 42 Diffusion of Innovations 155, 165 diffusion of technology 155 Digital Agenda, ...

Politics  Democracy and E Government  Participation and Service Delivery

"This book examines how e-government impacts politics and democracy in both developed and developing countries"--Provided by publisher.

Human Rights Responsibilities in the Digital Age

In a first step, I will present the theoretical basis, that is the democratic theory of democratic deliberation and discourse. ... I end with concluding observations on the gaps and challenges posed by digital technology for democratic ...

Human Rights Responsibilities in the Digital Age

This book examines the tangled responsibilities of states, companies, and individuals surrounding human rights in the digital age. Digital technologies have a huge impact – for better and worse – on human lives; while they can clearly enhance some human rights, they also facilitate a wide range of violations. States are expected to implement efficient measures against powerful private companies, but, at the same time, they are drawn to technologies that extend their own control over citizens. Tech companies are increasingly asked to prevent violations committed online by their users, yet many of their business models depend on the accumulation and exploitation of users' personal data. While civil society has a crucial part to play in upholding human rights, it is also the case that individuals harm other individuals online. All three stakeholders need to ensure that technology does not provoke the disintegration of human rights. Bringing together experts from a range of disciplines, including law, international relations, and journalism, this book provides a detailed analysis of the impact of digital technologies on human rights, which will be of interest to academics, research students and professionals concerned by this issue.

Constrained Elitism and Contemporary Democratic Theory

Thereby digital technology undermines the systems of controls that were associated with fixed cultural objects and brings control of culture itself into question by opening cultural objects to an unlimited process of alterations.5 ...

Constrained Elitism and Contemporary Democratic Theory

Today, examples of the public’s engagement with political issues through commercial and communicative mechanisms have become increasingly common. In February 2012, the Susan G. Komen Foundation reversed a decision to cease funding of cancer screening programs through Planned Parenthood amidst massive public disapproval. The same year, restaurant chain Chic-fil-A became embroiled in a massive public debate over statements its President made regarding same-sex marriage. What exactly is going on in such public engagement, and how does this relate to existing ideas regarding the public sphere and political participation? Is the public becoming increasingly vocal in its complaints? Or are new relationships between the public and economic and political leaders emerging? Timothy Kersey’s book asserts that the widespread utilization of internet communications technologies, especially social media applications, has brought forth a variety of new communicative behaviors and relationships within liberal polities. Through quick and seemingly chaotic streams of networked communication, the actions of these elites are subject to increasingly intense scrutiny and short-term pressure to ameliorate or at least address the concerns of segments of the population. By examining these new patterns of behavior among both elites and the general public, Kersey unearths the implications of these patterns for contemporary democratic theory, and argues that contemporary conceptualizations of "the public’" need to be modified to more accurately reflect practices of online communication and participation. By engaging with this topical issue, Kersey is able to closely examine the self-organization of both elite and non-elite segments of the population within the realm of networked communication, and the relations and interactions between these segments. His book combines perspectives from political theory and communication studies and so will be widely relevant across both disciplines.

A Moral Political Economy

“Democracy and the Digital Public Sphere.” In Digital Technology and Democratic Theory, ed. Lucy Bernholz, Helene Landemore, and Rob Reich. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Cohen, Joshua, and Joel Rogers, eds. 1995.

A Moral Political Economy

Economies - and the government institutions that support them - reflect a moral and political choice, a choice we can make and remake. Since the dawn of industrialization and democratization in the late eighteenth century, there has been a succession of political economic frameworks, reflecting changes in technology, knowledge, trade, global connections, political power, and the expansion of citizenship. The challenges of today reveal the need for a new moral political economy that recognizes the politics in political economy. It also requires the redesign of our social, economic, and governing institutions based on assumptions about humans as social beings rather than narrow self-serving individualists. This Element makes some progress toward building a new moral political economy by offering both a theory of change and some principles for institutional (re)design.

Digital Media Integration for Participatory Democracy

In an effort to overcome existing challenges in digital technology use while embracing the many opportunities offered by digital ... There are many other formulations of democratic theory connected to other schools of thought including ...

Digital Media Integration for Participatory Democracy

Digital technology has revitalized the landscape of political affairs. As e-government continues to become more prominent in society, conducting further research in this realm is vital to promoting democratic advancements. Digital Media Integration for Participatory Democracy provides a comprehensive examination of the latest methods and trends used to engage citizens with the political world through new information and communication technologies. Highlighting innovative practices and applications across a variety of areas such as technoethics, civic literacy, virtual reality, and social networking, this book is an ideal reference source for government officials, academicians, students, and researchers interested in the enhancement of citizen engagement in modern democracies.

Political Internet

Here comes the relevance of digital media and civic engagement. In pure direct democracy model, citizen cannot ideally participate. The space and times concepts hinder it largely. Digital technology has largely redefined the concepts of ...

Political Internet

This book investigates the Internet as a site of political contestation in the Indian context. It widens the scope of the public sphere to social media, and explores its role in shaping the resistance and protest movements on the ground. The volume also explores the role of the Internet, a global technology, in framing debates on the idea of the nation state, especially India, as well as diplomacy and international relations. It also discusses the possibility of whether Internet can be used as a tool for social justice and change, particularly by the underprivileged, to go beyond caste, class, gender and other oppressive social structures. A tract for our times, this book will interest scholars and researchers of politics, media studies, popular culture, sociology, international relations as well as the general reader.

Evolving Issues Surrounding Technoethics and Society in the Digital Age

Dahl (1989) argues that digital technology can prompt a “third democratic transformation” which will restore the characteristics of the Athenian participatory democracy. Digitaldemocracy theories have five characteristics that, ...

Evolving Issues Surrounding Technoethics and Society in the Digital Age

The advancement of technologies in the 20th century has radically transformed the interconnectedness of humans, science, and technology within an evolving society. Evolving Issues Surrounding Technoethics and Society in the Digital Age serves as an interdisciplinary base of scholarly contributions on the subject of technoethics, a field that deals with current and future problems that arise at the intersection of science, technological innovation, and human life and society. This premier reference work leverages ethical analysis, risk analysis, technology evaluation, and the combination of ethical and technological analyses within a variety of real life decision-making contexts, appealing to scholars and technology experts working in new areas of technology research where social and ethical issues emerge.

Public Sector Reform in Developing and Transitional Countries

Some disciplines focus on the implications of technology for democratic theory, others focus on its ability to ... of digital government in public administration still employ the terms e-government and e-governance interchangeably.

Public Sector Reform in Developing and Transitional Countries

Over recent decades, decentralization has emerged as a key Public Sector Reform strategy in a wide variety of international contexts. Yet, despite its emergence as a ubiquitous activity that cuts across disciplinary lines in international development, decentralization is understood and applied in many different ways by parties acting from contrary perspectives. This book offers a fascinating insight into theory and practice surrounding decentralization activities in the Public Sectors of developing and transitional countries. In drawing on the expertise of established scholars, the book explores the contexts, achievements, progress and challenges of decentralization and local governance. Notably, the contributions contained in this book are genuinely international in nature; the chapters explore aspects of decentralization and local governance in contexts as diverse as Ghana, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Morocco, Tanzania, Uganda, and Viet Nam. In summary, by examining the subject of decentralization with reference to specific developing and transitional Public Sector contexts in which it has been practiced, this book offers an excellent contribution towards a better understanding of the theory and practice of decentralization and local governance in international settings. This book was published as a special double issue of the International Journal of Public Administration.

Australian Politics in the Twenty First Century

... economic 290–1 Information and Communication Technology (ICT) 236 interest groups, defined 262 see also citizens' ... and see technologies, digital (media) 'fourth estate' role 238 functions 239 liberal democratic theory of 238–43 ...

Australian Politics in the Twenty First Century

Australian Politics in the Twenty-First Century brings to life traditional institutions, theories and concepts by considering the key question: how are Australia's political institutions holding up in the face of the new challenges, dynamics and turbulence that have emerged and intensified in the new millennium? This approach encourages students to critically examine the complex interplay between a centuries' old system and a diverse, modern Australian society. This text presents the many moving parts of Australia's political system from an institutional perspective: the legislative and judiciary bodies, as well as lobby groups, the media, minor parties and independents, and the citizenry - institutions not often considered but whose influence is rapidly increasing. Student learning is supported through learning objectives, key terms, discussion questions, further readings and breakout boxes that highlight key theories, events and individuals. The extensive resources available in the VitalSource interactive eBook reaffirm comprehension and extend learning.

Pragmatism and Social Philosophy

Framing in a Fractured Democracy: Impacts of Digital Technology on Ideology, Power and Cascading Network Activation. Communication Theory, 68 (2), 298–308. Fraser, N. (1990). Rethinking the Public Sphere: A Contribution to the Critique ...

Pragmatism and Social Philosophy

This book explores the role that American pragmatism played in the development of social philosophy in 20th-century Europe. The essays in the first part of the book show how the ideas of Peirce, James, and Dewey influenced the traditions of European philosophy, especially existentialism and the Frankfurt School of Critical Theory, that emerged in the 20th century. The second part of the volume deals with current challenges in social philosophy. The essays here demonstrate how discussions of two core issues in social philosophy—the conception of social conflict and the public—can be enriched with pragmatist resources. In featuring both historical and conceptual perspectives, these essays provide a full picture of pragmatism’s role in the development of Continental social philosophy. Pragmatism and Social Philosophy will be of interest to scholars and advanced students working on American philosophy, social philosophy, and Continental philosophy.

Operationalising e Democracy through a System Engineering Approach in Mauritius and Australia

An era of digital technology innovation creates its own issues of terminological obsolescence that must be tackled. ... But liberal democratic theory has had little to say about technology in this sense (Weinberger 1988: 125).

Operationalising e Democracy through a System Engineering Approach in Mauritius and Australia

This book describes how the Systems Engineering (SE) methodology can be used to harness technology and enhance democracy within any political system. Moreover, it provides a practical roadmap for countries and politicians who are willing to change their existing system of governance to one that allows the people to have a meaningful say. In this regard, the book compares and contrasts two countries, Mauritius and Australia, highlighting how SE and e-democracy can be implemented in different contexts.