Dimensions of Private Law

This book considers the inherent complexities of private law; relevant to property, tort, contract, legal method and legal theory.

Dimensions of Private Law

This book considers the inherent complexities of private law; relevant to property, tort, contract, legal method and legal theory.

Sanctity of Contracts in a Secular Age

Strict enforcement of unreasonable contracts can produce outrageous consequences. Courts of justice should have the means of avoiding them.

Sanctity of Contracts in a Secular Age

Strict enforcement of unreasonable contracts can produce outrageous consequences. Courts of justice should have the means of avoiding them.

Reconstructing American Legal Realism Rethinking Private Law Theory

Stephen Waddams, Dimensions of Private Law: Categories and Concepts in Anglo-American Legal Reasoning 12–13, 226 (2003); Roscoe Pound, Classification of Law, 37 Harv. L. Rev. 933, 942–43 (1924); Geoffrey Samuel, Can the Common Law Be ...

Reconstructing American Legal Realism   Rethinking Private Law Theory

In the myriad choices of interpretation judges face when confronted with rules and cases, legal realists are concerned with how these doctrinal materials carry over into judicial outcomes. What can explain past judicial behavior and predict its future course? How can law constrain judgments made by unelected judges? How can the distinction between law and politics be maintained despite the collapse of law's autonomy in its positivist rendition? In Reconstructing American Legal Realism & Rethinking Private Law Theory, Hanoch Dagan provides an innovative and useful interpretation of legal realism. He revives the legal realists' rich account of law as a growing institution accommodating three sets of constitutive tensions-power and reason, science and craft, and tradition and progress-and demonstrates how the major claims attributed to legal realism fit into this conception of law. Dagan seeks to rein in realist descendants who have become fixated on one aspect of the big picture, and to dispel the misconceptions that those gone astray represent the tradition accurately or that realism is now merely a historical signpost. He draws upon the realist texts of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Karl Llewellyn, and others to explain how legal realism offers important and unique jurisprudential insights that are not just a part of legal history, but are also relevant and useful for a contemporary understanding of legal theory. Building on this realist conception of law and enriching its texture, Dagan addresses more particular jurisprudential questions. He shows that the realist achievement in capturing law's irreducible complexity is crucial to the reinvigoration of legal theory as a distinct scholarly subject matter, and is also inspiring for a host of other, more specific theoretical topics, such as the rule of law, the autonomy and taxonomy of private law, the relationships between rights and remedies, and the pluralism and perfectionism that typify private law.

Structure and Justification in Private Law

Therefore, law cannot be understood merely by reference to its static elements (its existing rules); understanding the ... 30 S Waddams, Dimensions of Private Law: Categories and Concepts in Anglo-American Legal Reasoning (Cambridge, ...

Structure and Justification in Private Law

Peter Birks's tragically early death, and his immense influence around the world, led immediately to the call for a volume of essays in his honour by scholars who had known him as a colleague, teacher and friend. One such volume, published in 2006, contained essays largely from scholars working in England (Mapping the Law: Essays in Memory of Peter Birks, edited by Andrew Burrows and Lord Rodger). This volume contains the essays of those outside England who chose to honour Peter, and appears later than the English volume, reflecting the far flung habitations of its authors. The essays contained in this volume are focussed around the law of unjust enrichment, but are not narrowly preoccupied - instead they move freely from unjust enrichment to some of the most profound questions in private law concerning taxonomy, the relationship between contract, property and unjust enrichment, and the place of remedies within private law. This volume, featuring the work of some of the world's great private lawyers, provides a fitting tribute to a great scholar, and a series of thought-provoking essays inspired by his example. Contributors Kit Barker Michael Bryan Peter Butler Hanoch Dagan Simone Degeling Daniel Friedmann Mark Gergen Ross Grantham Steve Hedley John McCamus Mitchell McInnes Eoin O'Dell Charles Rickett Struan Scott Emily Sherwin Stephen Smith Richard Sutton Michael Tilbury Stephen Waddams Peter Watts Ernest Weinrib Eric Descheemaeker

A Short Introduction to Judging and to Legal Reasoning

Samuel, G (2004), English Private Law: Old and New Thinking in the Taxonomy Debate 24 Oxford Journal of Legal Studies ... 5th ed) Waddams, S (2003), Dimensions of Private Law: Categories and Concepts in Anglo-American Legal Reasoning ...

A Short Introduction to Judging and to Legal Reasoning

This Short Introduction looks at judging and reasoning from three perspectives: what legal reasoning has been; what legal reasoning is from the view of judges and jurists themselves (the internal view); and what legal reasoning is from the view of a social scientist epistemologist or humanities specialist (the external view). Combining cases and materials with original text, this unique, concise format is designed for students who are starting out on their law programmes, as well as for students and researchers who would like to examine judging and legal reasoning in more depth.

Rights and Private Law

65 Lord Hoffmann, 'The Achilleas: Custom and Practice or Foreseeability?' (2010) 14 Edinburgh Law Review 47, 58–59. 66 S Waddams, Dimensions of Private Law: Categories and Concepts in Anglo-American Legal Reasoning (Cambridge, ...

Rights and Private Law

In recent years a strand of thinking has developed in private law scholarship which has come to be known as 'rights' or 'rights-based' analysis. Rights analysis seeks to develop an understanding of private law obligations that is driven, primarily or exclusively, by the recognition of the rights we have against each other, rather than by other influences on private law, such as the pursuit of community welfare goals. Notions of rights are also assuming greater importance in private law in other respects. Human rights instruments are having an increasing influence on private law doctrines. And in the law of unjust enrichment, an important debate has recently begun on the relationship between restitution of rights and restitution of value. This collection is a significant contribution to debate about the role of rights in private law. It includes essays by leading private law scholars addressing fundamental questions about the role of rights in private law as a whole and within particular areas of private law. The collection includes contributions by advocates and critics of rights-based approaches and provides a thorough and balanced analysis of the relationship between rights and private law.

The Goals of Private Law

... law); S Waddams, Dimensions of Private Law: Categories and Concepts in Anglo-American Legal Reasoning (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2003) (noting how public law values have always been part of private law reasoning).

The Goals of Private Law

This collection contributes to a fundamentally important set of debates about the nature of private law. The essays consider whether private law should be seen as having goals and, if so, whether those goals are particular to private as opposed to public law. They consider the legitimacy of the pursuit of community welfare goals in private law and the place of instrumentalist thinking in private law scholarship. They explore the relationship between the pursuit of policy goals and the other influences that shape private law, such as the formal values of certainty, consistency and coherence and the need to do justice to the parties to particular disputes. The collection analyses the role that particular policy goals do and should play in particular private law doctrines, and contributes to debate about the relationship between community welfare goals and considerations of interpersonal morality arising from the interactions between individuals. The contributors are drawn from across the common law world and offer a diverse range of perspectives on the controversies under consideration.

The Foundation of Choice of Law

Family Law In modern terminology, “legal relations” would perhaps equate to what we call “categories of private law. ... Dimensions of Private Law: Categories and Concepts in Anglo-American Legal Reasoning (Cambridge: Cambridge ...

The Foundation of Choice of Law

This book focuses on the subject of choice of law as a whole and provides an analysis of its various rules, principles, doctrines and concepts. It offers a conceptual account of choice of law, called "choice equality foundation" (CEF) which aims to flesh out the normative basis of the subject. The author reveals that, despite the multiplicity of titles and labels within the myriad choice of law rules and practices of the U.S., Canadian, European, and other systems, many of them effectively confirm and crystallize CEF's vision of the subject. This alignment signifies the necessarily intimate relationship between theory and practice by which the normative underpinnings of CEF are deeply embedded and reflected in actual practical reality. Among other things, this book provides a justification of the nature and limits of such popular principles as party autonomy, most significant relationship, and closest connection. It also discusses such topics as the actual operation of public policy doctrine in domestic courts, and the relation between the notion of international human rights and international commercial dealings, and makes some suggestions about the ability of traditional rules to cope with the advancing challenges of the digital age.

The Public Private Nature of Charity Law

30 On the dangers of overly simple maps, see SWaddams, Dimensions of Private Law: Categories and Concepts in Anglo-American Legal Reasoning (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2003)2. 31 For an overview of these debates, ...

The Public Private Nature of Charity Law

Is charity law a 'private law' or a 'public law' subject? This book maps charity law's relationship to the public law-private law divide, arguing that charity law is best understood as a hybrid (public-private) legal tradition that is constantly seeking to maintain an equilibrium between the protection of the autonomy of property-owning individuals to direct and control their wealth, and the furtherance of competing public visions of the good. Of interest to scholars and charity lawyers alike, The Public-Private Nature of Charity Law applies its unique lens both to traditional topics such as the public benefit rule and charity law's rules of standing, and to more contemporary issues such as the co-optation of charitable resources by threatened welfare states and the emergence of social enterprise. 'This book should be read by all who are interested in the respective domains of public and private law. Kathryn Chan brings new light to the divide and reveals the way in which both public and private law inform charity law. The book is subtle, original and rigorous, with an excellent grasp of primary and secondary material.' - Paul Craig, Professor of English Law at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of St John's College 'An original and thought-provoking book which takes the somewhat unruly law of charities and, with great insight and clarity, helps it to find its place on the legal map.' - Mary Synge, Associate Professor in Law at the University of Exeter 'Kathryn Chan's impressive monograph breaks new ground in its analytical approach towards charity in the modern world. Her careful study helps us to understand how charitable enterprises partake of the values and concerns of both public and private law, and to evaluate the strength and weaknesses of different approaches to the governance of charitable enterprises.' - Lionel Smith, Sir William C Macdonald Professor of Law, McGill University

Revolution and Evolution in Private Law

It is time to move to a more modest definition and understanding of the goals and capabilities of legal scholarship. II. ... S Waddams, Dimensions of Private Law: Categories and Concepts in Anglo-American Legal Reasoning (Cambridge, ...

Revolution and Evolution in Private Law

The development of private law across the common law world is typically portrayed as a series of incremental steps, each one delivered as a result of judges dealing with marginally different factual circumstances presented to them for determination. This is said to be the common law method. According to this process, change might be assumed to be gradual, almost imperceptible. If this were true, however, then even Darwinian-style evolution – which is subject to major change-inducing pressures, such as the death of the dinosaurs – would seem unlikely in the law, and radical and revolutionary paradigms shifts perhaps impossible. And yet the history of the common law is to the contrary. The legal landscape is littered with quite remarkable revolutionary and evolutionary changes in the shape of the common law. The essays in this volume explore some of the highlights in this fascinating revolutionary and evolutionary development of private law. The contributors expose the nature of the changes undergone and their significance for the future direction of travel. They identify the circumstances and the contexts which might have provided an impetus for these significant changes. The essays range across all areas of private law, including contract, tort, unjust enrichment and property. No area has been immune from development. That fact itself is unsurprising, but an extended examination of the particular circumstances and contexts which delivered some of private law's most important developments has its own special significance for what it might indicate about the shape, and the shaping, of private law regimes in the future.

Philosophy of Private Law

is or brings about a private law wrong, the precise content of such wrongs being specified in our textbooks. ... Dimensions of Private Law: Categories and Concepts in Anglo-American Legal Reasoning (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press ...

Philosophy of Private Law

On what basis does tort law hold us responsible to those who suffer as a result of our carelessness? Why, when we breach our contracts, should we make good the losses of those with whom we contracted? In what sense are our torts and our breaches of contract 'wrongs'? These two branches of private law have for centuries provided philosophers and jurists with grounds for puzzlement. This book provides an outline of, and intervention in, contemporary jurisprudential debates about the natureand foundation of liability in private law. After outlining the realm of the philosophy of private law, the book divides into two. Part I examines the various components of liability responsibility in private law, including the notions of basic responsibility, conduct, causation and wrongfulness. Part II considers arguments purporting to show that private law does and should embody a conception of either distributive or corrective justice or some combination of the two. Throughout the booka number of distinctions - between conceptual and normative argument, between jurisprudential 'theory' and private law 'practice', between legal obligation and moral obligation - are analyzed, the aim being to give students an informed grasp of both the limits and possibilities of the philosophy of private law.

Enrichment at the Claimant s Expense

particular approach (be it contained in a judicial decision, academic monograph, legal text, or treatise) in as black and ... 29 See further S Waddams, Dimensions of Private Law: Categories and Concepts in Anglo-American Legal Reasoning ...

Enrichment at the Claimant s Expense

This book presents an account of attribution in unjust enrichment. Attribution refers to how and when two parties – a claimant and a defendant – are relevantly connected to each other for unjust enrichment purposes. It is reflected in the familiar expression that a defendant be 'enriched at the claimant's expense'. This book presents a structured account of attribution, consisting of two requirements: first, the identification of an enrichment to the defendant and a loss to the claimant; and, secondly, the identification of a connection between that enrichment and that loss. These two requirements must be kept separate from other considerations often subsumed within the expression 'enrichment at the claimant's expense' which in truth have nothing to do with attribution, and which instead qualify unjust enrichment liability for reasons that should be analysed in their own terms. The structure of attribution so presented fits a normative account of unjust enrichment based upon each party's exchange capacities. A defendant is enriched when he receives something that he has not paid for under prevailing market conditions, while a claimant suffers a loss when he loses the opportunity to charge for something under the same conditions. A counterfactual test – asking whether enrichment and loss arise 'but for' each other – provides the best generalisation for testing whether enrichment and loss are connected, thereby satisfying the requirements of attribution in unjust enrichment.

Elgar Encyclopedia of Comparative Law Second Edition

Samuel, G. (2004), 'The Notion of an Interest as a Formal Concept in English and in Comparative Law', in G. Canivet, ... Waddams, S. (2003), Dimensions of Private Law: Categories and Concepts in Anglo-American Legal Reasoning, ...

Elgar Encyclopedia of Comparative Law  Second Edition

Acclaim for the first edition: ïThis is a very important and immense book. . . The Elgar Encyclopedia of Comparative Law is a treasure-trove of honed knowledge of the laws of many countries. It is a reference book for dipping into, time and time again. It is worth every penny and there is not another as comprehensive in its coverage as ElgarÍs. I highly recommend the Elgar Encyclopedia of Comparative Law to all English chambers. This is a very important book that should be sitting in every university law school library.Í _ Sally Ramage, The Criminal Lawyer Containing newly updated versions of existing entries and adding several important new entries, this second edition of the Elgar Encyclopedia of Comparative Law takes stock of present-day comparative law scholarship. Written by leading authorities in their respective fields, the contributions in this accessible book cover and combine not only questions regarding the methodology of comparative law, but also specific areas of law (such as administrative law and criminal law) and specific topics (such as accident compensation and consideration). In addition, the Encyclopedia contains reports on a selected set of countriesÍ legal systems and, as a whole, presents an overview of the current state of affairs. Providing its readers with a unique point of reference, as well as stimulus for further research, this volume is an indispensable tool for anyone interested in comparative law, especially academics, students and practitioners.

Emerging Issues in Tort Law

Unfortunately, there is little reason to think that tort law understood nominally is likely to be theoretically or philosophically ... Dimensions of Private Law: Categories and Concepts in Anglo-American Legal Reasoning (Cambridge, ...

Emerging Issues in Tort Law

In this book, articles by leading tort scholars from Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, Israel, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States deal with important theoretical and practical issues that are emerging in the law of torts. The articles analyse recent leading developments in areas such as economic negligence, causation, vicarious liability, non-delegable duty, breach of statutory duty, intentional torts, damages, and tort law in the family. They provide a foretaste of the issues that will face tort law in the near future and offer critical viewpoints that should not go unheeded. With its rich breadth of contributors and topics, Emerging Issues in Tort Law will be highly useful to lawyers, judges and academics across the common law world. Contributors: Elizabeth Adjin-Tettey, Kumaralingam Amirthalingam, Peter Benson, Vaughan Black, Peter Cane, Erika Chamberlain, Israel Gilead, Paula Giliker, Rick Glofcheski, Lewis N Klar QC, Michael A Jones, Richard Lewis, John Murphy, Jason W Neyers, Ken Oliphant, David F Partlett, Stephen GA Pitel, Denise Reaume, Robert H Stevens, Andrew Tettenborn, Stephen Todd, Shauna van Praagh, Stephen Waddams, David R Wingfield, Richard W Wright.

Artefacts of Legal Inquiry

Valverde, M (2015) Chronotopes of Law: Jurisdiction, Scale and Governance (New York: Routledge). van der Burg, ... Waddams, S (2003) Dimensions of Private Law: Categories and Concepts in Anglo-American Legal Reasoning (Cambridge: ...

Artefacts of Legal Inquiry

What is the value of fictions, metaphors, figures and scenarios in adjudication? This book develops three models to help answer that question: inquiry, artefacts and imagination. Legal language, it is argued, contains artefacts – forms that signal their own artifice and call upon us to do things with them. To imagine, in turn, is to enter a distinctive epistemic frame where we temporarily suspend certain epistemic norms and commitments and participate actively along a spectrum of affective, sensory and kinesic involvement. The book argues that artefacts and related processes of imagination are valuable insofar as they enable inquiry in adjudication, ie the social (interactive and collective) process of making insight into what values, vulnerabilities and interests might be at stake in a case and in similar cases in the future. Artefacts of Legal Inquiry is structured in two parts, with the first offering an account of the three models of inquiry, artefacts and imagination, and the second examining four case studies (fictions, metaphors, figures and scenarios). Drawing on a broad range of theoretical traditions – including philosophy of imagination and emotion, the theory and history of rhetoric, and the cognitive humanities – this book offers an interdisciplinary defence of the importance of artefactual language and imagination in adjudication.

Consumer Credit Debt and Investment in Europe

For a general discussion of this legal technique and the use of categories in legal reasoning, see S. Waddams, Dimensions of Private Law: Categories and Concepts in AngloAmerican Legal Reasoning (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ...

Consumer Credit  Debt and Investment in Europe

"This topical collection of essays emanates from the Consumer Protection in Europe: Theory and Practice duo colloquium in December 2009. That conference explored consumer protection in Europe and covered topics which are even more relevant today given the revisions to the proposed Consumer Rights Directive, the appointment of an Expert Group on a common frame of reference and the Green Paper on European Contract Law. It was organised within the work programme Credit and Debt: Protecting the Vulnerable in Europe - a project placing emphasis on vulnerability in financial transactions. This volume focuses on consumer protection in credit and investments in the context of unprecedented turmoil in those markets and EU harmonisation initiatives in the area. It explores key issues such as responsible lending, information disclosure, consumer confidence, the regulation of consumer investment services and the protection of bank depositors"--

Form and Substance in the Law of Obligations

28 Beever and Rickett, above n 25, which reviewed S Waddams, Dimensions of Private Law: Categories and Concepts in Anglo-American Legal Reasoning (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2003). Though far more mild-mannered in tone, ...

Form and Substance in the Law of Obligations

This volume explores the relationship between form and substance in the law of obligations. It builds on the rich tradition of legal thought that deploys the concepts of form and substance to inform our understanding of the common law. The essays in this collection offer multiple conceptions of form and substance and cover an array of private law subjects, scholarly approaches and jurisdictions. The collection makes it clear that the interplay between form and substance is a key element of the dynamism that characterises this area of the law.

Street on Torts

blurred that they prefer not to talk of three separate branches of the civil law but, instead, of a general law of ... thoroughly) Waddams, Dimensions of Private Law: Categories and Concepts in Anglo-American Legal Reasoning (2003).

Street on Torts

Tried and tested by generations of students, Street on Torts can be trusted to provide a clear and accurate explanation of tort law. In this edition, John Murphy has thoroughly rewritten the book to bring a fresh and readable style to this classic text. Students new to tort law can read treet chapter by chapter as they work through their lectures: the book has been substantially restructured to map closely to a typical undergraduate law course and provides all the essential material in one volume. Street's broad coverage has been maintained toensure it appeals to a wide range of institutions as a main course text. This edition provides a strong anaylsis of case law, explaining how torts actually work and examining the social purposes behind them. The importance of the Human Rights Act is traced thoughout the book, and a new chapter has been included on the misuse of private information to reflect this rapidly developing area of the law. Further reading sections have been added to the end of each chapter. Online Resource Centre The twelfth edition of Street on Torts is accompanied by an Online Resource Centre providing twice-yearly updates, giving students easy access to key developments in the law.

Legal Fictions in Theory and Practice

Dimensions of private law: Categories and concepts in anglo-american legal reasoning. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge Waddams, S. 2011. Principle and policy in contract law: Competing or complementary concepts?

Legal Fictions in Theory and Practice

This multi-disciplinary, multi-jurisdictional collection offers the first ever full-scale analysis of legal fictions. Its focus is on fictions in legal practice, examining and evaluating their roles in a variety of different areas of practice (e.g. in Tort Law, Criminal Law and Intellectual Property Law) and in different times and places (e.g. in Roman Law, Rabbinic Law and the Common Law). The collection approaches the topic in part through the discussion of certain key classical statements by theorists including Jeremy Bentham, Alf Ross, Hans Vaihinger, Hans Kelsen and Lon Fuller. The collection opens with the first-ever translation into English of Kelsen’s review of Vaihinger’s As If. The 17 chapters are divided into four parts: 1) a discussion of the principal theories of fictions, as above, with a focus on Kelsen, Bentham, Fuller and classical pragmatism; 2) a discussion of the relationship between fictions and language; 3) a theoretical and historical examination and evaluation of fictions in the common law; and 4) an account of fictions in different practice areas and in different legal cultures. The collection will be of interest to theorists and historians of legal reasoning, as well as scholars and practitioners of the law more generally, in both common and civil law traditions.

The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Law

... enrichment has been one of the most important developments of the twentieth century in Anglo-American private law': Stephen Waddams, Dimensions of Private Law: Categories and Concepts in Anglo-American Legal Reasoning (2003), 10.

The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Law

This fully revised and updated second edition of The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Law provides a wide-ranging and diverse critical survey of comparative law at the beginning of the twenty-first century. It summarizes and evaluates a discipline that is time-honoured but not easily understood in all its dimensions. In the current era of globalization, this discipline is more relevant than ever, both on the academic and on the practical level. The Handbook is divided into three main sections. Section I surveys how comparative law has developed and where it stands today in various parts of the world. This includes not only traditional model jurisdictions, such as France, Germany, and the United States, but also other regions like Eastern Europe, East Asia, and Latin America. Section II then discusses the major approaches to comparative law - its methods, goals, and its relationship with other fields, such as legal history, economics, and linguistics. Finally, section III deals with the status of comparative studies in over a dozen subject matter areas, including the major categories of private, economic, public, and criminal law. The Handbook contains forty-eight chapters written by experts from around the world. The aim of each chapter is to provide an accessible, original, and critical account of the current state of comparative law in its respective area which will help to shape the agenda in the years to come. Each chapter also includes a short bibliography referencing the definitive works in the field.