Diners Of New England

The days of diner builders offering a standard style of diner influenced by the broader trends of culture and technology ... Of the six New England states , this development has been most evident in Connecticut , and there mostly in the ...

Diners Of New England

Maps pinpoint diners' locations and trace routes for scenic drives Comprehensive listings of diners with addresses, phone numbers, and brief descriptions Diner styles and manufacturers Every diner is unique, from its design to its menu, but Randy Garbin knows the heart of a diner is the people who bring it to life day after day. Here he takes readers on a lively trip across the 6 states of New England and offers a sampling of the diners that operate there, focusing on the personalities and communities--and, of course, the cuisine--that make each diner special. Garbin shows that these roadside havens of good food and good people are alive and well.

The New England Diner Cookbook Classic and Creative Recipes from the Finest Roadside Eateries

There are several diners in New England, such as O'Rourke's in Connecticut and A1 in Maine, that routinely step outside the boundaries of traditional diner fare, and this chapter features a handful of recipes from such places that ...

The New England Diner Cookbook  Classic and Creative Recipes from the Finest Roadside Eateries

New England is the birthplace of the American diner, and this book brings together the best of them and shares with you their best recipes for comfort food, New England style. Celebrate the food, culture, and funky architecture of these scrappy culinary icons with recipes, color photos, interviews with owners, and heartwarming stories from a broad array of customers. Diners were born in New England (Rhode Island, to be exact), and they have a long and colorful history as local eateries of distinction because of both their menus and their buildings. Though many diners have gone by the wayside in the past half century, there are still plenty around, and each has at least a dish or two for which they’re best known and that keep customers coming back year after year. The New England Diner Cookbook celebrates every facet of these diamonds in the rough. Along with diners that have perfected the tried-and-true items like corned beef hash, clam chowder, and malted milkshakes, many have developed relatively sophisticated menus that include distinctly New England delicacies like Lobster Chow Mein, Butterscotch Indian Pudding, and Portobello Mushroom Fries.

Diners of New York

The diner's owner, Alex Krywanczyk, said that he saw a tray picked up and flung across a counter. Although the Worcester Lunch Car Company seemed to have a monopoly on the New England diner market at one time, few were placed outside ...

Diners of New York

Maps pinpoint locations. Comprehensive listings for each region. Includes diner styles and manufacturers.

Classic Diners of New Hampshire

Fuller, Bruce; Gilley's Back on the Square, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Portsmouth Herald, date unknown. Garbin, Randy; Diners of New England, Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books, 2005. Gutman, Richard J. S.; American Diner: Then and Now.

Classic Diners of New Hampshire


New England Neon

Perhaps in celebration of the region's long history, New England is full of Colonial Theaters. The oldest of these illuminated their venues with incandescent lights, but others had lovingly restored neon marquees. Many diners employed a ...

New England Neon

If you know where to look, you'll find the greatness of the golden age of neon in New England. If you don't, here's your chance! The golden age of neon in New England lasted more than 30 years, from the dark days of the Great Depression through the go-go years of the 1960s, but its spectacular legacy remains. With dozens of original color photographs and informative text, New England Neon takes armchair travelers--and nostalgia lovers--up and down the main streets and back roads of the region, from the shores of Lake Champlain to the tip of Cape Cod. Photographed and written by Susan Mara Bregman, the volume celebrates the style and exuberance of these one-of-a-kind creations in Boston and Brattleboro, Kittery and Cranston, New Haven and Weirs Beach. Evoking an era when New England glowed at night, the book might make you want to go candlepin bowling or grab a hot wiener and a coffee milk.

New Hampshire Diners

The history of diners in New Hampshire is similar to that of the other New England states. Diners began, basically, with the introduction of horsedrawn lunch wagons that were initially produced in Worcester, Massachusetts, from the late ...

New Hampshire Diners

New Hampshire loves its classic diners. Porcelain-enameled and stainless steel facades dot the highways and collective memories of the state. They are the unofficial town halls where news great and small is discussed over a steaming cup of coffee. New Hampshire has lost many diners over the last five decades, but there are still plenty of vintage or retro-inspired eateries that serve up homey meals and local stories. Visit Roger's Redliner in Portsmouth and dig into a plate of hash browns, or stop in at the Red Arrow in Manchester and reminisce over the loss of the local Rainbow Vet's Diner. Diner historian Larry Cultrera brings more than thirty-three years of research and his own flavor of storytelling to this classic slice of Granite State cuisine.

American Diner Then and Now

The Wason Manufacturing plant in Springfield sent diners to the “ Maine woods , " throughout the rest of New England , and to New York , New Jersey , and Pennsylvania . When going short distances , the cars were shipped in assembled ...

American Diner Then and Now

This edition includes a state-by-state directory, "Where the Diners Are,listing locations for currently operating diners.

New England

Around World War I , New England's lunch wagons evolved into diners . In 1912 , the city of Providence , whose streets were becoming clogged with dozens of lunch wagons , passed a law mandating that all food vending wagons must be off ...

New England

Provides alphabetically arranged entries on the architecture, art, ecology, folklore, food, religion, and recreation of each major United States region.

Historical Dictionary of New England

New Englanders still enjoy regional foods at classic diners, like the Modern Diner in Pawtucket, the first diner to be placed on the National Register of Historic Places, or Vermont's Miss Bellows Falls Diner and Moody's Diner on Route ...

Historical Dictionary of New England

This second edition of Historical Dictionary of New England contains a chronology, an introduction, appendix, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has over 700 cross-referenced entries on important personalities, places, institutions, and events.

Classic Diners of Maine

Diners of New England. Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books, 2005. This history of diners throughout New England has interesting information about diners in each state, along with the make of many of the prefabricated buildings.

Classic Diners of Maine

Across Maine, iconic diners come in different shapes and sizes. From the fluffy pancakes as big as a plate to piles of perfectly crisped corned beef hash, these beloved spots have served classic comfort food to generations of hungry patrons. For more than ninety years, Moody's Diner in Waldoboro has offered famous homemade pies to regulars and visitors alike. From the Lumberjack Breakfast at the Palace Diner in Biddeford to the steak and cheese omelet at the Deluxe Diner in Rumford, author Sarah Walker Caron reveals the stories and recipes behind the state's most iconic community eateries.

Diners of Pennsylvania

Diners. New York: Abrams, 1978; rev. and updated ed., New York: Abrams, 1995. Engle, Michael, and Mario Monti. Diners of New York. Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books, 2008 Garbin, Randy. Diners of New England.

Diners of Pennsylvania

Revised and updated edition of the best-selling first edition (978-0-8117-2878-2).

Delirious New Orleans

Also see Robert 0. Williams, Hometown Diners (New York: Abrams, 1999); Michael K. Witzel, The American Diner (St. Paul, Minn.: Motorbooks International, 1999); and Randy Garbin, Diners of New England (New York: Stockpile Books, 2005).

Delirious New Orleans

From iconic neighborhoods such as the French Quarter and the Garden District to more economically modest but no less culturally vibrant areas, architecture is a key element that makes New Orleans an extraordinary American city. Delirious New Orleans began as a documentary project to capture the idiosyncratic vernacular architecture and artifacts—vintage mom-and-pop businesses, roadside motels, live music clubs, neon signs, wall murals, fast-food joints, and so on—that helped give the city's various neighborhoods their unique character. But because so many of these places and artifacts were devastated by Hurricane Katrina, Delirious New Orleans has become both a historical record of what existed in the past and a blueprint for what must be rebuilt and restored to retain the city's unique multicultural landscape. Stephen Verderber starts with the premise that New Orleans's often-overlooked neighborhoods imbue the city with deep authenticity as a place. He opens Delirious New Orleans with a photo-essay that vividly presents this vernacular architecture and its artifacts, both before Katrina and in its immediate aftermath. In the following sections of the book, which are also heavily illustrated, Verderber takes us on a tour of the city's commercial vernacular architecture, as well as the expressive folk architecture of its African American neighborhoods. He discusses how the built environment was profoundly shaped by New Orleans's history of race and class inequities and political maneuvering, along with its peculiar, below-sea-level geography. Verderber also considers the aftermath of Katrina and the armada of faceless FEMA trailers that have, at least temporarily and by default, transformed this urban landscape.

New England s Colonial Inns Taverns

Of course, no old New England tavern would be complete without a ghost in residence. Some diners have reported the presence of a pipe-smoking spirit said to possibly be Walter. Michael, however, is not so sure. “I personally think there ...

New England s Colonial Inns   Taverns

New England’s Colonial Inns and Taverns explores the history of these institutions and visits those that are still around. Today, there’s no better remedy for the winter blues than a visit to a Colonial tavern. For centuries, travelers who have stepped out of the cold and into a tavern have found not only hearty Yankee fare, but also a feast for the senses: the warmth of a roaring fire, the creaking of uneven plank floors, the intoxicating incense of a smoky hearth and mulled apple cider, the taste of a cocktail chased by a swig of history. Centuries ago, taverns offered respites for weary wayfarers on horseback. Today, they remain welcome havens from high-speed lives.

Diners of the North Shore

Anderson , Will . New England Roadside Delights . Portland , Maine : Will Anderson , 1989 . Bean , John , Alan Bellink , and Donald Kaplan . Diners of the Northeast . Stockbridge , Massachusetts : Berkshire Press , 1980 . The Diner .

Diners of the North Shore

From the time the first handful of night lunch wagons served up their simple fare on the streets of the North Shore in 1890, residents from every social and economic standing have frequented these familiar beacons of hospitality and their descendants, the diners. Over the course of the sixty years that followed, the area's manufacturing, transportation, and recreation centers provided the hungry clientele who helped spur the metamorphosis of the humble lunch wagon into the sleek, efficient, and friendly eatery known as the diner. Diners of the North Shore is a fascinating collection of many previously unpublished images from the golden age of the diner. Bearing names such as Hesperus in Gloucester, Lafayette in Salem, and Suntaug in Peabody, these eat-on-the-run oases provided their customers with not only a square meal but also an atmosphere as welcoming as one's kitchen. From the primitive Night Owl lunch wagon to the art deco-inspired Sterling Streamliner, Diners of the North Shore showcases each diner's unique character, along with the colorful personalities who ran them.

Food Cultures of the World Encyclopedia

By the early 20th century, public health and safety concerns necessitated that the mobile wagons become set in permanent locations, and by 1940 the classic stainless steel diner had been developed. Diners might serve New England fare, ...

Food Cultures of the World Encyclopedia

This comprehensive reference work introduces food culture from more than 150 countries and cultures around the world—including some from remote and unexpected peoples and places. * Entries covering over 150 countries and cultures from around the world * More than 100 expert contributors * Vignettes * An index that facilitates cross-cultural comparison

The American Diner

THE COUNTRY DINER The Country Diner operated on High Ridge Road in Stamford, Connecticut, circa 1 950s. New England's "Newest and Most Modern" diner, it featured all of the architectural pizzazz that the postwar diner designers could ...

The American Diner

The rise of the American diner is the most savory of phenomenons, where classic architecture, a friendly face behind the counter, and some mean pie all combined to make these little roadside stops a treasured part of history. From the early days when Walter Scott brought his horse-drawn lunch wagons through the streets to the heyday of mass-produced chrome and neon diners in the 1950s, The American Diner offers a full blue-plate special of nostalgia for all those who loved the counter culture of these great eateries. More than 250 historical and bright colorful photographs help remind us of life before fast food, and generous helpings of classic advertisements, cool collectibles, and architectural highlights also highlight the era. Diners from coast to coast are featured, giving readers a trip to some of the best stainless-steel and neon diners that still dot the American roadways.

Diners Drive ins and Dives

Manchester, NH 03101 603-626-1118 They've got real home cooking that's heavy on the New www.redarrowdiner.com England traditions like corned beef and cabbage and homemade baked beans and toast, or just plain old comfort food like ...

Diners  Drive ins and Dives

Food Network star Guy Fieri takes you on a tour of America's most colorful diners, drive-ins, and dives in this tie-in to his enormously popular television show, complete with recipes, photos, and memorabilia. Packed with Guy's iconic personality, Diners, Drive-ins and Dives follows his hot-rod trips around the country, mapping out the best places most of us have never heard of. From digging in at legendary burger joint the Squeeze Inn in Sacramento, California, baking Peanut Pie from Virginia Diner in Wakefield, Virginia, or kicking back with Pete's "Rubbed and Almost Fried" Turkey Sandwich from Panini Pete's in Fairhope, Alabama, Guy showcases the amazing personalities, fascinating stories, and outrageously good food offered by these American treasures.

Insight Guide New England

UUZAU ULIZOZ The classic diner New England is home to one of the original fast food restaurants - the diner . First created in Providence in 1872 as a horse - drawn lunch wagon , diners grew into a major manufacturing business in ...

Insight Guide New England

Insight Guides, the world's largest visual travel guide series, in association with Discovery Channel, the world's premier source of nonfiction entertainment, provides more insight than ever. From the most popular resort cities to the most exotic villages, Insight Guides capture the unique character of each culture with an insider's perspective. Inside every Insight Guide you'll find:.Evocative, full-colour photography on every page.Cross-referenced, full-colour maps throughout.A brief introduction including a historical timeline .Lively, essays by local writers on the culture, history, and people.Expert evaluations on the sights really worth seeing.Special features spotlighting particular topics of interest.A comprehensive Travel Tips section with listings of the best restaurants, hotels, and attractions, as well as practical information on getting around and advice for travel with children

The Worcester Lunch Car Company

Flanking the ordinary front door was a pair of light fixtures expressly made for Worcester diners in the 1940s . ... The Worcester Lunch Car and Carriage Manufacturing Company was the premier diner builder in New England from 1906 to ...

The Worcester Lunch Car Company

The Worcester Lunch Car Company monopolized the New England market with its colorful diners. Although Worcester sent a smattering of diners as far as Florida and Michigan, the cars were most popular in their home territory. From 1906 to 1961, the company built six hundred fifty-one diners, with as few as ten or as many as seventy seats. Known for their small size, solid construction, and old-fashioned styling, the cars featured oak and mahogany woodwork, intricate ceramic tile patterns, and a backbar of stainless steel. Their distinctive porcelain enamel exteriors with names emblazoned on them proudly proclaimed their presence along the roadside. Day and night, these diners fed generations of New England's working class; today, fewer than one hundred lunch cars still operate.