Discourse Features of Ten Languages of West Central Africa

The third section presents data that applies insights from Relevance Theory. Describes markers of prominence and backgrounding.

Discourse Features of Ten Languages of West Central Africa

Presents 12 papers on coherence, participant reference, and Relevance Theory in Niger-Congo and Chadic languages of Cameroon. The papers are organized into three sections to explain the linguistic features of Niger-Congo and Chadic languages of Cameroon whose meaning can only be explained by taking into account domains larger than the sentence. Folk tales and other narratives are used to illustrate discourse features of 10 languages from Cameroon, Chad, Nigeria, and Zaïre. The first section concentrates on how coherence is maintained in a text when the author introduces a local discontinuity. The second section identifies factors which affect the amount of encoding used as a speaker refers to participants throughout a discourse. The third section presents data that applies insights from Relevance Theory. Describes markers of prominence and backgrounding.

Discourse Features of Ten Languages of West Central Africa

Discourse features of ten languages of West - Central Africa , ed . by Stephen H. Levensohn . 1994 . 121 . The Doyayo language : Selected studies , by Elisabeth Wiering and Marinus Wiering . 1994 . For further information or a catalog ...

Discourse Features of Ten Languages of West Central Africa


Language Typology and Language Universals Sprachtypologie und sprachliche Universalien La typologie des langues et les universaux linguistiques 2 Halbband

Discourse features of ten languages of West-Central Africa. Dallas: SIL and University of Texas at Arlington, 109— 124. Levinson, Stephen C. 1987. “Pragmatics and the grammar of anaphora: a partial pragmatic reduction of Binding and ...

Language Typology and Language Universals   Sprachtypologie und sprachliche Universalien   La typologie des langues et les universaux linguistiques  2  Halbband

This handbook provides a comprehensive and thorough survey of our current insights into the diversity and unity found across the 6000 languages of this planet. The 125 articles include inter alia chapters on the patterns and limits of variation manifested by analogous structures, constructions and linguistic devices across languages (e.g. word order, tense and aspect, inflection, color terms and syllable structure). Other chapters cover the history, methodology and the theory of typology, as well as the relationship between language typology and other disciplines. The authors of the individual sections and chapters are for the most part internationally known experts on the relevant topics. The vast majority of the articles are written in English, some in French or German. The handbook is not only intended for the expert in the fields of typology and language universals, but for all of those interested in linguistics. It is specifically addressed to all those who specialize in individual languages, providing basic orientation for their analysis and placing each language within the space of what is possible and common in the languages of the world.

African Languages

Althamito - semitische nominale Genusexponenten in heutigen Hamitensprachen . ... Morphological similarity as a criterion of genetic relationship between languages . ... Discourse Features of Ten Languages of West - Central Africa .

African Languages

An accessible introduction to African languages and linguistics, covering language typology, linguistic structures and sociolinguistics.

Grounding in English and Arabic News Discourse

Discourse Features of Ten Languages of West-Central Africa. Dallas: Summer Institute of Linguistics, 3—14. Longacre, Robert E. 1968 1976 1979a 1979b 1981 1982 1983 1985 1989 1995 1996 Discourse, Paragraph, and Sentence Structure in ...

Grounding in English and Arabic News Discourse

Grounding in English and Arabic News Discourse explores the discourse notion of grounding (viz. the foreground-background structure), and examines it in the various structures that occur in short news texts. A text-level approach to grounding and the differentiation between several core concepts relating to the various textual and non-textual structures, distinguish the book from other approaches in the field. A corpus-based analysis focuses on sentence-initial expressions and examines the grounding-signalling function of several markers in both English and Arabic. The analysis captures constraints on the occurrence of particular markers, and the extensive illustrative examples explain the strategies that writers employ to cope with problems of recasting grounding-values in news texts. The author also shows how the failure to signal appropriate grounding-values is likewise associated with the failure to deliver the appropriate type of text. Grounding is a relatively unexplored area of investigation in Arabic (text)linguistics, and the study identifies a series of previously unrecognized language features, highlighting the discourse pragmatic function that syntax serves. The book will be invaluable to researchers and students of discourse, pragmatics, contrastive rhetoric, and communication. It will also be of interest to all those involved in translation and intercultural studies.

Reference in Discourse

Topic, focus, and the mental representation of discourse referents. ... Proceedings of the 6th Discourse Anaphora and Anaphor Resolution Colloquium (DAARC 2007). ... Discourse features of ten languages of West-Central Africa.

Reference in Discourse

This is the first full study of how people refer to entities in natural discourse. It contributes to the understanding of both linguistic diversity and the cognitive underpinnings of language and it provides a framework for further research in both fields. Andrej Kibrik focuses on the way specific entities are mentioned in natural discourse, during which about every third word usually depends on referential choice. He considers reference as an overt representation of underlying cognitive processes and combines a theoretically-oriented cognitive approach with empirically-based cross-linguistic analysis. He begins by introducing the cognitive approach to discourse analysis and by examining the relationship between discourse studies and linguistic typology. He discusses reference as a linguistic phenomenon, in connection with the traditional notions of deixis, anaphora, givenness, and topicality, and describes the way his theoretical approach is centered on notions of referent activation in working memory. He argues that the speaker is responsible for the shape of discourse and that referential expressions should be understood as choices made by speakers rather than as puzzles to be solved by addressees. Kibrik examines the cross-linguistic aspects of reference and the typology of referential devices, including referring expressions per se, such as free and bound pronouns, and referential aids that help to tell apart the concurrently activated entities. This discussion is based on the data from about 200 languages from around the world. He then proposes a comprehensive model of referential choice, in which he draws on concepts from cognitive linguistics, psycholinguistics, cognitive psychology, and cognitive neuroscience, and applies this to Russian and English. He also draws together his empirical analyses in order to examine what light his analysis of discourse can shed on the way information is processed in working memory. In the final part of the book Andrej Kibrik offers a wider perspective, including deixis, referential aspects of gesticulation and signed languages. This pioneering work will interest linguists and cognitive scientists interested in discourse, reference, typology, and the operations of working memory in linguistic communication.

Focus Strategies in African Languages

In Discourse features of ten languages of West-Central Africa, Stephen H. Levinsohn (ed.), 231– 241. (SIL Publications 109). Arlington: University of Texas. Redden, James E. 1979 A descriptive grammar of Ewondo.

Focus Strategies in African Languages

Over the last two decades, focus has become a prominent topic in major fields in linguistic research (syntax, semantics, phonology). Focus Strategies in African Languages contributes to the ongoing discussion of focus by investigating focus-related phenomena in a range of African languages, most of which have been under-represented in the theoretical literature on focus. The articles in the volume look at focus strategies in Niger-Congo and Afro-Asiatic languages from several theoretical and methodological perspectives, ranging from detailed generative analysis to careful typological generalization across languages. Their common aim is to deepen our understanding of whether and how the information-structural category of focus is represented and marked in natural language. Topics investigated are, among others, the relation of focus and prosody, the effects of information structure on word order, ex situ versus in situ strategies of focus marking, the inventory of focus marking devices, focus and related constructions, focus-sensitive particles. The present inquiry into the focus systems of African languages has repercussions on existing theories of focus. It reveals new focus strategies as well as fine-tuned focus distinctions that are not discussed in the theoretical literature, which is almost exclusively based on well-documented intonation languages.

Semantics

Further thoughts on four discourse particles in Mandara. In: S. H. Levinsohn (ed.). Discourse Features of Ten Languages of West-Central Africa (SIL Publications 119). Arlington, TX: University of Texas, 211–221. Portner, Paul 2009.

Semantics

This handbook comprises, in three volumes, an in-depth presentation of the state of the art in linguistic semantics from a wide variety of perspectives. It contains 112 articles written by leading scholars from around the world. These articles present detailed, yet accessible, introductions to key issues, including the analysis of specific semantic categories and constructions, the history of semantic research, theories and theoretical frameworks, methodology, and relationships with related fields; moreover, they give expert guidance on topics of debate within the field, on the strengths and weaknesses of existing theories, and on the likely directions for the future development of semantic research. In many cases, the articles written for this handbook promise to become the standard references on the topics they cover. This work will provide an essential reference for both advanced students and researchers in semantics and related fields within linguistics, psychology, philosophy, and other areas.

Introduction to Typology

Semantic Constraints on Relevance in Lobala Discourse . " Discourse Features of Ten Languages of West - Central Africa . Ed . S. Levinsohn . Dallas : The Summer Institute of Linguistics and U of Texas at Arlington . 125-49 .

Introduction to Typology

Ideal in introductory courses dealing with grammatical structure and linguistic analysis, Introduction to Typology overviews the major grammatical categories and constructions in the world's languages. Framed in a typological perspective, the constant concern of this primary text is to underscore the similarities and differences which underlie the vast array of human languages.

Semantics Sentence and Information Structure

Further thoughts on four discourse particles in Mandara. In: S. H. Levinsohn (ed.). Discourse Features of Ten Languages of West-Central Africa (SIL Publications 119). Arlington, TX: University of Texas, 211–221. Portner, Paul 2009.

Semantics   Sentence and Information Structure

Read this book to get a deeper understanding of a wide range of semantics research on complex sentences and meaning in discourse. These in-depth articles from leading names in their fields cover the core concepts of sentential semantics such as tense, modality, conditionality, propositional attitudes, scope, negation, and coordination. The highly cited material, covers questions, imperatives, copular clauses, and existential sentences. It also includes essential research on sentence types, and explains central concepts in the theory of information structure and discourse structure, such as topics, cohesion and coherence, accessibility and discourse particles.

The Nweh Narrative Genre Implications on the Pedagogic Role of Translation

“Thematic Development, Continuity, and Prominence in Tyap Discourse”. In Levinsohn S.N (ed) Discourse Features in Ten Languages of West and Central Africa. SIL and University of Texas at Arlington. Formin, N.U. (1993).

The Nweh Narrative Genre  Implications on the Pedagogic Role of Translation

People use talk in marked and varied ways to make sense of the world. This has constituted one of the major themes in humanistic and social scientific thought since the mid-twentieth century. This book discusses the defining elements of the study of these themes (Discourse Analysis), throws more light on the narrative discourse showing its implications on the pedagogic role of translation. The major interest of this study lies in the belief that mere descriptive accounts of sentences are insufficient in connected discourse. One needs to go beyond the surface realisation in order to attain the intended meaning. Thus, it is not enough to describe the internal structure of the elements in a sentence or a discourse; the ‘why’ and the ‘where’ these elements should be used is equally important. It is for this reason that the study draws from Functional Grammar and Relevance theoretical frameworks to identify and characterize the constituents of the Nweh narrative genre and to portray the relevance of such a study in Discourse Analysis to translation, both as a discipline and as a pedagogic tool in Second Language Acquisition contexts. It is hoped that language teachers and translators will use the suggestions in this book to ameliorate their performances. This study challenges Nweh speakers to work towards the standardization and development of the Nweh Language and invites other scholars to continue to promote research in African languages at large and Cameroon national languages in particular. It is through such commitment that the much-needed preservation of Cameroon’s multilingual heritage can be achieved. Professor Gabriel Mba

The Routledge Handbook of African Linguistics

In O. Hieda (Ed.), Studies in Nilotic linguistics 10 (pp. 19–35). Tokyo: ILCAA. Perrin, M. (1994). Rheme and focus in Mambila. In S. H. Levinsohn (Ed.), Discourse features in ten languages of West-Central Africa (pp. 231–241).

The Routledge Handbook of African Linguistics

The Handbook of African Linguistics provides a holistic coverage of the key themes, subfields, approaches and practical application to the vast areas subsumable under African linguistics that will serve researchers working across the wide continuum in the field. Established and emerging scholars of African languages who are active and current in their fields are brought together, each making use of data from a linguistic group in Africa to explicate a chosen theme within their area of expertise, and illustrate the practice of the discipline in the continent.

The Bantu Languages

1991) Discourse features of ten languages of West-Central Africa, Dallas: SIL and the University of Texasat Arlington. Lewis,P. W.(1994) Aspectsof the phonological acquisition of clicks in Xhosa. MA thesis.

The Bantu Languages

Gerard Philippson is Professor of Bantu Languages at the Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales and is a member of the Dyamique de Langage research team of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Lyon II University. He has mainly worked on comparative Bantu tonology. Other areas of interest include Afro-Asiatic, general phonology, linguistic classification and its correlation with population genetics.

Tense and Aspect in Bantu

Ki-Vumba, A Dialect of the Southern Kenya Coast. ... Encyclopédie pahouine, Congo francais—Eléments de grammaire et de dictionnaire francais-pahouin, 37–71. A75. ... Discourse Features of Ten Languages of West-Central Africa.

Tense and Aspect in Bantu

Derek Nurse looks at variations in the form and function of tense and aspect in Bantu, a branch of Niger-Congo, the world's largest language phylum. His account is based on data from more than 200 Bantu languages and varieties, a representative sample of which is freely available on the publisher's website.

Participants in Old Testament Texts and the Translator

C.P. Taylor (1994) “Participant Reference in Nomaande Narrative Discourse,” in Discourse Features of Ten Languages of West-Central Africa (ed. S.H. Levinsohn; Dallas: Summer Institute of Linguistics) 91-108. E. Tov (1985) “The Literary ...

Participants in Old Testament Texts and the Translator

In Biblical Hebrew texts, individuals and groups are referred to according to specific rules and conventions. How are participants introduced into a text and traced further? When is this done by means of proper names, when by nouns, and when by pronominal elements? In this book, examples from many Biblical passages illustrate the patterns involved. These rules help to solve problems of participant reference in controversial passages. But it is not enough to know who are the participants; one needs to establish why they are referred to the way they are. Main characters in a text are referred to differently from others. Certain devices of participant reference help to indicate paragraph boundaries. Unusual references to participants aim to be noticed and have rhetorical impact. Proper names may occur where one would have expected a pronominal element (or vice versa). Participants may be mentioned in an unexpected order. Special attention is given to such unusual reference devices and the rhetorical strategies involved: climax, suspense and implicit comment. In a translation, these strategies should still be as clear as they are in the source text. So how have reference devices been handled in ancient and modern translations?

Linguistic Field Methods

Eliciting figures of speech. ... Field procedures for the analysis of participant reference in a monologue discourse. In Stephen Levinsohn, ed., Discourse features of ten languages of WestCentral Africa, 109-121.

Linguistic Field Methods

Linguistic Field Methods approaches the elicitation of linguistic data from native speaker informants in a novel and engaging manner. The authors follow introductory chapters surveying the general enterprise of field research with chapters exploring methods of eliciting data in eight major areas of current linguistic interest: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, sociolinguistics and dialectology, and historical linguistics.

The Oxford Handbook of Information Structure

Discourse Features of Ten Languages of West-Central Africa (SIL Publications 109). Arlington, TX: University of Texas, 231–241. Pesetsky, David (1982). Paths and Categories. PhD Dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, ...

The Oxford Handbook of Information Structure

This book provides linguists with a clear, critical, and comprehensive overview of theoretical and experimental work on information structure. Leading researchers survey the main theories of information structure in syntax, phonology, and semantics as well as perspectives from psycholinguistics and other relevant fields. Following the editors' introduction the book is divided into four parts. The first, on theories of and theoretical perspectives on information structure, includes chapters on topic, prosody, and implicature. Part 2 covers a range of current issues in the field, including focus, quantification, and sign languages, while Part 3 is concerned with experimental approaches to information structure, including processes involved in its acquisition and comprehension. The final part contains a series of linguistic case studies drawn from a wide variety of the world's language families. This volume will be the standard guide to current work in information structure and a major point of departure for future research.

Quotative Indexes in African Languages

1994 Discourse features often languages of West-Central Africa. Publications in Linguistics 119. Dallas/ Arlington: Summer Institute of Linguistics and University of Texas. Li, Charles N. 1986 Direct speech and indirect speech: a ...

Quotative Indexes in African Languages

The book represents the results of a synchronic and diachronic cross-African survey of quotative indexes. These are linguistic expressions that signal in the ongoing discourse the presence of a quote (often called "direct reported speech"). For this purpose, 39 African languages were selected to represent the genealogical and geographical diversity of the continent. The study is based primarily on this language sample, in particular on the analysis of quotative indexes and related expressions from a text corpus of each sample language, but also includes a wide range of data from the published literature on other African as well as non- African languages. It is the first typological investigation of direct reported discourse of this magnitude in a large group of languages. The book may thus serve as a starting point of similar studies in other geographical areas or even with a global scope, as well as stimulate more detailed investigations of particular languages. The results of the African survey challenge several prevailing cross-linguistic generalizations regarding quotative indexes and reported discourse constructions as a whole, of which two are of particular interest. In the syntactic domain, where reported discourse has mostly been dealt with under so- called sentential complementation, the study supports the minority view that direct reported discourse and also a large portion of indirect reported discourse show hardly any evidence for the claim that the reported clause is a syntactic object complement of some matrix verb. With respect to grammaticalization, the work concludes that speech verbs are, against common belief, not a frequent source of quotatives, complementizers, and other related markers. Far more frequent sources are markers of similarity and manner; generic verbs of equation, inchoativity, and action; and pronominals referring to the quote or the speaker. Another more general conclusion of the study is that especially direct reported discourse can be fruitfully analyzed as part of a larger linguistic domain called "mimesis". This comprises expressions which represent a state of affairs by means of enactment/ performance rather than with the help of "canonical" linguistic signs and includes, besides reported discourse, world-referring bodily gestures, ideophone-like signs, and non-linguistic sound.

Discourse Features of New Testament Greek

In Discourse Features of Ten Languages of West - Central Africa , edited by Stephen H. Levinsohn , 191-210 . Dallas : Summer Institute of Linguistics and the University of Texas at Arlington . Minor , Eugene E. 1992.

Discourse Features of New Testament Greek

Dr. Levinsohn, with expertise in both New Testament Greek and discourse analysis, wrote this coursebook for use in classroom lectures and discussion groups, as well as for self-instruction. He draws on his research and his experience in seminars, teach-ins, and courses as he describes discourse features that he and other researchers have studied in depth. For maximum benefit, students should already have some basic familiarity with discourse analysis and some knowledge of Koine Greek. They do not need extensive knowledge of Greek vocabulary, but do need the ability to identify the case of a noun, the tense-aspect of a verb, and to distinguish participial, relative, and main clauses. The seventeen chapters cover topics such as constituent order, sentence conjunctions, patterns of reference, back grounding and highlighting, and reporting conversations. Discourse features are illustrated from passages of the New Testament. Most sections include review questions to assist the student in applying the principles. -- Amazon