Domestic Devotions in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

This collection focuses on lived religion and the devotional practices found in the domestic settings of late medieval and early modern Europe.

Domestic Devotions in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Domestic devotion has become an increasingly important area of research in recent years, with the publication of a number of significant studies on the early modern period in particular. This Special Issue aims to build on these works and to expand their range, both geographically and chronologically. This collection focuses on lived religion and the devotional practices found in the domestic settings of late medieval and early modern Europe. More particularly, it investigates the degree to which the experience of personal or familial religious practice in the domestic realm intersected with the more public expression of faith in liturgical or communal settings. Its broad geographical range (spanning northern, southern, central and eastern Europe) includes practices related to Christianity, Judaism and Islam. This Special Issue will be of interest to historians, art historians, medievalists, early modernists, historians of religion, anthropologists and theologians, as well as those interested in the history of material religious culture. It also offers important insights into research areas such as gender studies, histories of the emotions and histories of the senses.

Domestic Devotions in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

This collection focuses on lived religion and the devotional practices found in the domestic settings of late medieval and early modern Europe.

Domestic Devotions in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Domestic devotion has become an increasingly important area of research in recent years, with the publication of a number of significant studies on the early modern period in particular. This Special Issue aims to build on these works and to expand their range, both geographically and chronologically. This collection focuses on lived religion and the devotional practices found in the domestic settings of late medieval and early modern Europe. More particularly, it investigates the degree to which the experience of personal or familial religious practice in the domestic realm intersected with the more public expression of faith in liturgical or communal settings. Its broad geographical range (spanning northern, southern, central and eastern Europe) includes practices related to Christianity, Judaism and Islam. This Special Issue will be of interest to historians, art historians, medievalists, early modernists, historians of religion, anthropologists and theologians, as well as those interested in the history of material religious culture. It also offers important insights into research areas such as gender studies, histories of the emotions and histories of the senses.

Lived Religion and Gender in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe

The Introduction of this book is freely available as a downloadable Open Access PDF under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives 4.0 license and is available here: https://tandfbis.s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/rt ...

Lived Religion and Gender in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe

This study is an exploration of lived religion and gender across the Reformation, from the 14th–18th centuries. Combining conceptual development with empirical history, the authors explore these two topics via themes of power, agency, work, family, sainthood and witchcraft. By advancing the theoretical category of ‘experience’, Lived Religion and Gender reveals multiple femininities and masculinities in the intersectional context of lived religion. The authors analyse specific case studies from both medieval and early modern sources, such as secular court records, to tell the stories of both individuals and large social groups. By exploring lived religion and gender on a range of social levels including the domestic sphere, public devotion and spirituality, this study explains how late medieval and early modern people performed both religion and gender in ways that were vastly different from what ideologists have prescribed. Lived Religion and Gender covers a wide geographical area in western Europe including Italy, Scandinavia and Finland, making this study an invaluable resource for scholars and students concerned with the history of religion, the history of gender, the history of the family, as well as medieval and early modern European history. The Introduction of this book is freely available as a downloadable Open Access PDF under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives 4.0 license and is available here: https://tandfbis.s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/rt-files/docs/Open+Access+Chapters/9781351003384_oaintroduction.pdf

Childhood Youth and Religious Minorities in Early Modern Europe

THE EARLY MODERN JEWISH HOUSEHOLD A short overview of the Jewish household is necessary to better understand the ... and early modern Europe.19 Although they draw on a large range of sources and different aspects of domestic devotion, ...

Childhood  Youth and Religious Minorities in Early Modern Europe

This edited collection examines different aspects of the experience and significance of childhood, youth and family relations in minority religious groups in north-west Europe in the late medieval, Reformation and post-Reformation era. It aims to take a comparative approach, including chapters on Protestant, Catholic and Jewish communities. The chapters are organised into themed sections, on 'Childhood, religious practice and minority status', 'Family and responses to persecution', and 'Religious division and the family: co-operation and conflict'. Contributors to the volume consider issues such as religious conversion, the impact of persecution on childhood and family life, emotion and affectivity, the role of childhood and memory, state intervention in children's religious upbringing, the impact of confessionally mixed marriages, persecution and co-existence. Some chapters focus on one confessional group, whilst others make comparisons between them.

Defining the Holy

As such this volume provides essential reading for anyone with an interest in the ecclesiastical development of western Europe from the thirteenth to the eighteenth centuries.

Defining the Holy

Holy sites, both public - churches, monasteries, shrines - and more private - domestic chapels, oratories - populated the landscape of medieval and early modern Europe, providing contemporaries with access to the divine. These sacred spaces thus defined religious experience, and were fundamental to both the geography and social history of Europe over the course of 1,000 years. But how were these sacred spaces, both public and private, defined? How were they created, used, recognised and transformed? And to what extent did these definitions change over the course of time, and in particular as a result of the changes wrought in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Taking a strongly interdisciplinary approach, this volume tackles these questions from the point of view of archaeology, architectural and art history, liturgy, and history to consider the fundamental interaction between the sacred and the profane. Exploring the establishment of sacred space within both the public and domestic spheres, as well as the role of the secular within the sacred sphere, each chapter provides fascinating insights into how these concepts helped shape, and were shaped by, wider society. By highlighting these issues on a European basis from the medieval period through the age of the reformations, these essays demonstrate the significance of continuity as much as change in definitions of sacred space, and thus identify long term trends which have hitherto been absent in more limited studies. As such this volume provides essential reading for anyone with an interest in the ecclesiastical development of western Europe from the thirteenth to the eighteenth centuries.

Lived Religion and Gender in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe

'Domestic Devotions and Family Piety in German Catholicism'. In Piety and Family in Early Modern Europe: Essays in Honour of Stephen Ozment, edited by Marc Forster and Benjamin J. Kaplan, 97–114. Farnham: Ashgate, 2005. Gauvard, Claude.

Lived Religion and Gender in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe

This study is an exploration of lived religion and gender across the Reformation, from the 14th–18th centuries. Combining conceptual development with empirical history, the authors explore these two topics via themes of power, agency, work, family, sainthood and witchcraft. By advancing the theoretical category of ‘experience’, Lived Religion and Gender reveals multiple femininities and masculinities in the intersectional context of lived religion. The authors analyse specific case studies from both medieval and early modern sources, such as secular court records, to tell the stories of both individuals and large social groups. By exploring lived religion and gender on a range of social levels including the domestic sphere, public devotion and spirituality, this study explains how late medieval and early modern people performed both religion and gender in ways that were vastly different from what ideologists have prescribed. Lived Religion and Gender covers a wide geographical area in western Europe including Italy, Scandinavia and Finland, making this study an invaluable resource for scholars and students concerned with the history of religion, the history of gender, the history of the family, as well as medieval and early modern European history.

Early Modern Privacy

Domestic Devotions in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (Basel: 2020); Brundin A. – Howard D. – Laven M., The Sacred Home in Renaissance Italy (Oxford: 2018); Martin J. – Ryrie A. (eds.), Private and Domestic Devotion in Early Modern ...

Early Modern Privacy

An examination of instances, experiences, and spaces of early modern privacy. It opens new avenues to understanding the structures and dynamics that shape early modern societies through examination of a wide array of sources, discourses, practices, and spatial programmes.

Private and Domestic Devotion in Early Modern Britain

19–32, and in 'The Development of the English Prayer Book', in Karin Maag and John D. Witvliet (eds), Worship in Medieval and Early Modern Europe: Change and Continuity in Religious Practice (Notre Dame, IN, 2004), pp. 132–61.

Private and Domestic Devotion in Early Modern Britain

Scholars increasingly recognise that understanding the history of religion means understanding worship and devotion as well as doctrines and polemics. Early modern Christianity consisted of its lived experience. This collection and its companion volume (Worship and the Parish Church in Early Modern Britain, ed. Natalie Mears and Alec Ryrie) bring together an interdisciplinary range of scholars to discuss what that lived experience comprised, and what it meant. Private and domestic devotion - how early modern men and women practised their religion when they were not in church - is a vital and largely hidden subject. Here, historical, literary and theological scholars examine piety of conformist, non-conformist and Catholic early modern Christians, in a range of private and domestic settings, in both England and Scotland. The subjects under analysis include Bible-reading, the composition of prayers, the use of the psalms, the use of physical props for prayers, the pious interpretation of dreams, and the troubling question of what counted as religious solitude. The collection as a whole broadens and deepens our understanding of the patterns of early modern devotion, and of their meanings for early modern culture as a whole.

The Routledge History of the Domestic Sphere in Europe

Private and Domestic Devotion in Early Modern Britain (Farnham: Ashgate, 2012); Andrew Cambers, Godly Reading: Print, Manuscript and ... Defining the Holy: Sacred Space in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (Exeter: Ashgate, 2005), p.

The Routledge History of the Domestic Sphere in Europe

This book addresses the multifaceted history of the domestic sphere in Europe from the Age of Reformation to the emergence of modern society. By focusing on daily practice, interaction and social relations, it shows continuities and social change in European history from an interior perspective. The Routledge History of the Domestic Sphere in Europe contains a variety of approaches from different regions that each pose a challenge to commonplace views such as the emergence of confessional cultures, of private life, and of separate spheres of men and women. By analyzing a plethora of manifold sources including diaries, court records, paintings and domestic advice literature, this volume provides an overview of the domestic sphere as a location of work and consumption, conflict and cooperation, emotions and intimacy, and devotion and education. The book sheds light on changing relations between spouses, parents and children, masters and servants or apprentices, and humans and animals or plants, thereby exceeding the notion of the modern nuclear family. This volume will be of great use to upper-level graduates, postgraduates and experienced scholars interested in the history of family, household, social space, gender, emotions, material culture, work and private life in early modern and nineteenth-century Europe.

Cognitive Sciences and Medieval Studies

... see Blud and perk in this volume, as well as my own 'What Julian Saw: The Embodied Showings and the Items for Private Devotion' in a special issue of Religions: Domestic Devotions in Medieval and Early Modern Europe, ed.

Cognitive Sciences and Medieval Studies

With the rapid development of the cognitive sciences and their importance to how we contemplate questions about the mind and society, recent research in the humanities has been characterised by a ‘cognitive turn’. For their part, the humanities play an important role in forming popular ideas of the human mind and in analysing the way cognitive, psychological and emotional phenomena are experienced in time and space. This collection aims to inspire medievalists and other scholars within the humanities to engage with the tools and investigative methodologies deriving from cognitive sciences. Contributors explore topics including medieval and modern philosophy of mind, the psychology of religion, the history of psychological medicine and the re-emergence of the body in cognition. What is the value of mapping how neurons fire when engaging with literature and art? How can we understand psychological stress as a historically specific phenomenon? What can medieval mystics teach us about contemplation and cognition?

The Sacred Home in Renaissance Italy

68–87 Corbellini, Sabrina, 'Creating a Domestic, Sacred Space: Religious Reading in Late Medieval Italy', in Domestic Devotions in Early Modern Italy, ed. by Maya Corry, Marco Faini, and Alessia Meneghin (Leiden: Brill, 2018, ...

The Sacred Home in Renaissance Italy

The Sacred Home in Renaissance Italy explores the rich devotional life of the Italian household between 1450 and 1600. Rejecting the enduring stereotype of the Renaissance as a secular age, this interdisciplinary study reveals the home to have been an important site of spiritual revitalization. Books, buildings, objects, spaces, images, and archival sources are scrutinized to cast new light on the many ways in which religion infused daily life within the household. Acts of devotion, from routine prayers to extraordinary religious experiences such as miracles and visions, frequently took place at home amid the joys and trials of domestic life — from childbirth and marriage to sickness and death. Breaking free from the usual focus on Venice, Florence, and Rome, The Sacred Home investigates practices of piety across the Italian peninsula, with particular attention paid to the city of Naples, the Marche, and the Venetian mainland. It also looks beyond the elite to consider artisanal and lower-status households, and reveals gender and age as factors that powerfully conditioned religious experience. Recovering a host of lost voices and compelling narratives at the intersection between the divine and the everyday, The Sacred Home offers unprecedented glimpses through the keyhole into the spiritual lives of Renaissance Italians.

Attachment and God in Medieval England

Pigg, Daniel, 'Children and Childhood in the Middle Ages', in Classen, Handbook of Medieval Culture (2015), 149–58. ... Ryan, Salvador, ed., Domestic Devotions in Medieval and Early Modern Europe: Special issue of Religions (2019).

Attachment and God in Medieval England

This study applies attachment theory to religious self-narratives from medieval England. It examines whether God could appear as an adequate attachment figure in times of high mortality and inadequate childrearing practices, and whether emphasis on God’s proximity benefits psychological reorganisation.

The Clergy in Early Modern Scotland

Anticlericalism in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe. Leiden, 1994. ... Court and Culture in Renaissance Scotland: Sir David Lindsay of the Mount (1486–1555). ... 'Domestic Devotions and Family Piety in German Catholicism'.

The Clergy in Early Modern Scotland

A nuanced approach to the role played by clerics at a turbulent time for religious affairs.

The Dynamics of Pilgrimage

Defining the Holy: Sacred Space in Medieval and Early Modern Europe. Farnham: Ashgate, 2005. Hamlin, Hannibal. “Sobs for Sorrowful Souls: Versions of the Penitential Psalms for Domestic Devotion.” In Private and Domestic Devotion in ...

The Dynamics of Pilgrimage

This book offers a systematic, chronological analysis of the role played by the human senses in experiencing pilgrimage and sacred places, past and present. It thus addresses two major gaps in the existing literature, by providing a broad historical narrative against which patterns of continuity and change can be more meaningfully discussed, and focusing on the central, but curiously neglected, area of the core dynamics of pilgrim experience. Bringing together the still-developing fields of Pilgrimage Studies and Sensory Studies in a historically framed conversation, this interdisciplinary study traces the dynamics of pilgrimage and engagement with holy places from the beginnings of the Judaeo-Christian tradition to the resurgence of interest evident in twenty-first century England. Perspectives from a wide range of disciplines, from history to neuroscience, are used to examine themes including sacred sites in the Bible and Early Church; pilgrimage and holy places in early and later medieval England; the impact of the English Reformation; revival of pilgrimage and sacred places during the nineteenth and twentieth Centuries; and the emergence of modern place-centred, popular 'spirituality'. Addressing the resurgence of pilgrimage and its persistent link to the attachment of meaning to place, this book will be a key reference for scholars of Pilgrimage Studies, History of Religion, Religious Studies, Sensory Studies, Medieval Studies, and Early Modern Studies.

The Routledge History of Women in Early Modern Europe

Bowden, Caroline, 'Collecting the Lives of Early Modern Women Religious: Obituary Writing and the Development of Collective ... Robert Southwell's Short Rule for a Good Life and Catholic Domestic Devotion in Post-Reformation England', ...

The Routledge History of Women in Early Modern Europe

The Routledge History of Women in Early Modern Europe is a comprehensive and ground-breaking survey of the lives of women in early-modern Europe between 1450 and 1750. Covering a period of dramatic political and cultural change, the book challenges the current contours and chronologies of European history by observing them through the lens of female experience. The collaborative research of this book covers four themes: the affective world; practical knowledge for life; politics and religion; arts, science and humanities. These themes are interwoven through the chapters, which encompass all areas of women’s lives: sexuality, emotions, health and wellbeing, educational attainment, litigation and the practical and leisured application of knowledge, skills and artistry from medicine to theology. The intellectual lives of women, through reading and writing, and their spirituality and engagement with the material world, are also explored. So too is the sheer energy of female work, including farming and manufacture, skilled craft and artwork, theatrical work and scientific enquiry. The Routledge History of Women in Early Modern Europe revises the chronological and ideological parameters of early-modern European history by opening the reader’s eyes to an exciting age of female productivity, social engagement and political activism across European and transatlantic boundaries. It is essential reading for students and researchers of early-modern history, the history of women and gender studies.

Mary Magdalene Iconographic Studies from the Middle Ages to the Baroque

54 on domestic devotional art, see Jacqueline Marie Musacchio, “the Madonna and child, a host of saints, and domestic ... space and devo- tion in the Middle ages,” in Defining the Holy: Sacred Space in Medieval and early Modern europe, ...

Mary Magdalene  Iconographic Studies from the Middle Ages to the Baroque

Mary Magdalene, Iconographic Studies from the Middle Ages to the Baroque examines the iconographic inventions in Magdalene imagery and the contextual factors that shaped her representation in visual art from the fourteenth to the seventeenth centuries.

Material Culture and Queenship in 14th century France

4 Caroline Walker Bynum, Christian Materiality: An Essay on Religion in Late Medieval Europe (New York, 2011), p. 35. ... “Domestic Space and Devotion,” in Defining the Holy: Sacred Space in Medieval and Early Modern Europe, ed.

Material Culture and Queenship in 14th century France

In Material Culture and Queenship in 14th-century France Marguerite Keane analyzes the artistic and devotional context of the household of a medieval queen, Blanche of Navarre (1331-1398), as revealed through the evidence of her testaments of 1396 and 1398.

Domestic Institutional Interiors in Early Modern Europe

... little space for the kind of domestic devotions and family piety that developed in Protestant regions': see Marc R. Foster, 'Domestic Devotions and Family Piety in German Catholicism', in Piety and Family in Early Modern Europe.

Domestic Institutional Interiors in Early Modern Europe

The early modern period saw the proliferation of religious, public and charitable institutions and the emergence of new educational structures. By bringing together two areas of inquiry that have so far been seen as distinct, the study of institutions and that of the house and domesticity, this collection provides new insights into the domestic experience of men, women and children who lived in non-family arrangements, while also expanding and problematizing the notion of 'domestic interior'. Through specific case studies, contributors reassess the validity of the categories 'domestic' and 'institutional' and of the oppositions private public, communal individual, religious profane applied to institutional spaces and objects. They consider how rituals, interior decorations, furnishings and images were transferred from the domestic to the institutional interior and vice versa, but also the creative ways in which the residents participated in the formation of their living settings. A variety of secular and religious institutions are considered: hospitals, asylums and orphanages, convents, colleges, public palaces of the ducal and papal court. The interest and novelty of this collection resides in both its subject matter and its interdisciplinary and Europe-wide dimension. The theme is addressed from the perspective of art history, architectural history, and social, gender and cultural history. Chapters deal with Italy, Britain, the Netherlands, Flanders and Portugal and with both Protestant and Catholic settings. The wide range of evidence employed by contributors includes sources - such as graffiti, lottery tickets or garland pictures - that have rarely if ever been considered by historians.

Devotional Portraiture and Spiritual Experience in Early Netherlandish Painting

Webb, Diane, “Domestic Space and Devotion in the Middle Ages”, in Defining the Holy: Sacred Space in Medieval & Early Modern Europe, ed. Andrew Spicer and Sarah Hamilton (Aldershot: 2005), 27–47. Welsh, Jennifer, The Cult of St. Anne in ...

Devotional Portraiture and Spiritual Experience in Early Netherlandish Painting

an interpretation of early Netherlandish paintings with devotional portraits according to which many of these images act as visualisation of the spiritual process of the sitters.

The Feeling Heart in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Marian devotions exploded in early modern Europe, and have been identified as “one of the ways in which early modern ... can be contrasted with the diffusion of the idea of Mary as a domestic icon of maternal love, purity, and sorrow.

The Feeling Heart in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

The heart is an iconic symbol in the medieval and early modern European world. In addition to being a physical organ, it is a key conceptual device related to emotions, cognition, the self and identity, and the body. The heart is read as a metaphor for human desire and will, and situated in opposition to or alongside reason and cognition. In medieval and early modern Europe, the “feeling heart” – the heart as the site of emotion and emotional practices – informed a broad range of art, literature, music, heraldry, medical texts, and devotional and ritual practices. This multidisciplinary collection brings together art historians, literary scholars, historians, theologians, and musicologists to highlight the range of meanings attached to the symbol of the heart, the relationship between physical and metaphorical representations of the heart, and the uses of the heart in the production of identities and communities in medieval and early modern Europe.