Domestic Devotions in the Early Modern World

This volume sets out to explore the world of domestic devotions and is premised on the assumption that the home was a central space of religious practice and experience throughout the early modern world.

Domestic Devotions in the Early Modern World

This volume sets out to explore the world of domestic devotions taking place in people's homes across space and time, and is premised on the assumption that the home was a central space of religious practice and experience throughout the early modern world.

Domestic Devotions in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

While scholars such as Torsten Wollina and Marion H. Katz (both contributers to the recent Brill volume Domestic Devotions in the Early Modern World) have examined the intersection of Islamic devotion and domestic spheres, ...

Domestic Devotions in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Domestic devotion has become an increasingly important area of research in recent years, with the publication of a number of significant studies on the early modern period in particular. This Special Issue aims to build on these works and to expand their range, both geographically and chronologically. This collection focuses on lived religion and the devotional practices found in the domestic settings of late medieval and early modern Europe. More particularly, it investigates the degree to which the experience of personal or familial religious practice in the domestic realm intersected with the more public expression of faith in liturgical or communal settings. Its broad geographical range (spanning northern, southern, central and eastern Europe) includes practices related to Christianity, Judaism and Islam. This Special Issue will be of interest to historians, art historians, medievalists, early modernists, historians of religion, anthropologists and theologians, as well as those interested in the history of material religious culture. It also offers important insights into research areas such as gender studies, histories of the emotions and histories of the senses.

Religious Materiality in the Early Modern World

Domestic Devotions in Early Modern Italy (Leiden: Brill, 2018), 220–43. Gatta, Annalisa, Maria Giannatiempo López and Stefano Papetti (eds.), Per Grazia Ricevuta: gli ex voto del Museo di San Nicola a Tolentino (Tolentino: Biblioteca ...

Religious Materiality in the Early Modern World

This collection of essays offers a comparative perspective on religious materiality across the early modern world. Setting out from the premise that artefacts can provide material evidence of the nature of early modern religious practices and beliefs, the volume tests and challenges conventional narratives of change based on textual sources. Religious Materiality brings together scholars of Catholic, Protestant, Jewish, Islamic and Buddhist practices from a range of fields, including history, art history, museum curatorship and social anthropology. The result is an unprecedented account of the wealth and diversity of devotional objects and environments, with a strong emphasis on cultural encounters, connections and exchanges.

The Routledge History of the Domestic Sphere in Europe

Domestic Devotions in Early Modern Italy; Marco Faini and Alessia Meneghin, Domestic Devotions in the Early Modern World (Leiden: Brill, 2019). 38 Philip Mattox, “Domestic Sacral Space in the Florentine Renaissance Palace”, ...

The Routledge History of the Domestic Sphere in Europe

This book addresses the multifaceted history of the domestic sphere in Europe from the Age of Reformation to the emergence of modern society. By focusing on daily practice, interaction and social relations, it shows continuities and social change in European history from an interior perspective. The Routledge History of the Domestic Sphere in Europe contains a variety of approaches from different regions that each pose a challenge to commonplace views such as the emergence of confessional cultures, of private life, and of separate spheres of men and women. By analyzing a plethora of manifold sources including diaries, court records, paintings and domestic advice literature, this volume provides an overview of the domestic sphere as a location of work and consumption, conflict and cooperation, emotions and intimacy, and devotion and education. The book sheds light on changing relations between spouses, parents and children, masters and servants or apprentices, and humans and animals or plants, thereby exceeding the notion of the modern nuclear family. This volume will be of great use to upper-level graduates, postgraduates and experienced scholars interested in the history of family, household, social space, gender, emotions, material culture, work and private life in early modern and nineteenth-century Europe.

Cosmos and Materiality in Early Modern Prague

Ivanič , Suzanna , ' Amulets and the Material Interface of Beliefs in Seventeenth - Century Prague Burgher Homes ' , in Domestic Devotions in the Early Modern World , edited by Marco Faini and Alessia Meneghin ( Leiden : Brill , 2019 ) ...

Cosmos and Materiality in Early Modern Prague

In the seventeenth century Prague was the setting for a complex and shifting spiritual world. By studying the city's material culture, this book presents a bold alternative understanding of early modern religion in central Europe.

Private and Domestic Devotion in Early Modern Britain

This collection brings together an interdisciplinary range of scholars to discuss the lived experience of early modern religion in domestic settings in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

Private and Domestic Devotion in Early Modern Britain

Scholars increasingly recognise that understanding the history of religion means understanding worship and devotion as well as doctrines and polemics. Early modern Christianity consisted of its lived experience. This collection and its companion volume (Worship and the Parish Church in Early Modern Britain, ed. Natalie Mears and Alec Ryrie) bring together an interdisciplinary range of scholars to discuss what that lived experience comprised, and what it meant. Private and domestic devotion - how early modern men and women practised their religion when they were not in church - is a vital and largely hidden subject. Here, historical, literary and theological scholars examine piety of conformist, non-conformist and Catholic early modern Christians, in a range of private and domestic settings, in both England and Scotland. The subjects under analysis include Bible-reading, the composition of prayers, the use of the psalms, the use of physical props for prayers, the pious interpretation of dreams, and the troubling question of what counted as religious solitude. The collection as a whole broadens and deepens our understanding of the patterns of early modern devotion, and of their meanings for early modern culture as a whole.

Catholic Missionaries in Early Modern Asia

In Domestic Devotions in the Early Modern World, edited by Marco Faini and Alessia Meneghin, 1–29. Leiden: Brill, 2019. Farge, William J. The Japanese Translations of the Jesuit Mission Press, 1590–1614: De imitatione Christi and Guía ...

Catholic Missionaries in Early Modern Asia

Over recent decades, historians have become increasingly interested in early modern Catholic missions in Asia as laboratories of cultural contact. This book builds on recent ground-breaking research on early modern Catholic missions, which has shown that missionaries in Asia cooperated with and accommodated the needs of local agents rather than being uncompromising promoters of post-Tridentine doctrine and devotion. Bringing together some of the most renowned and innovative researchers from Anglophone countries and continental Europe, this volume investigates how missionaries’ entanglements with local societies across Asia contributed to processes of localization within the early modern Catholic church. The focus of the volume is on missionaries’ adaptation to four ideal-typical social settings that played an eminent role in early modern Asian missions: (1) the symbolically loaded princely court; (2) the city as a space of especially dense communication; (3) the countryside, where missionary presence was only rarely permanent; (4) and the household – a central arena of conversion in early modern Asian societies. Shining a fresh light onto the history of early modern Catholic missions and the early modern Eurasian cultural exchange, this will be an important book for any scholar of religious history, history of cultural contact/global history and early modern history in Asia.

Private and Domestic Devotion in Early Modern Britain

... more readily. the characteristics of domestic devotion during the early modern period helped shape the identity of Scots and left a profound influence upon their outlook and behaviour. 80 For e.g. James Melville's piety and outlook, ...

Private and Domestic Devotion in Early Modern Britain

Scholars increasingly recognise that understanding the history of religion means understanding worship and devotion as well as doctrines and polemics. Early modern Christianity consisted of its lived experience. This collection and its companion volume (Worship and the Parish Church in Early Modern Britain, ed. Natalie Mears and Alec Ryrie) bring together an interdisciplinary range of scholars to discuss what that lived experience comprised, and what it meant. Private and domestic devotion - how early modern men and women practised their religion when they were not in church - is a vital and largely hidden subject. Here, historical, literary and theological scholars examine piety of conformist, non-conformist and Catholic early modern Christians, in a range of private and domestic settings, in both England and Scotland. The subjects under analysis include Bible-reading, the composition of prayers, the use of the psalms, the use of physical props for prayers, the pious interpretation of dreams, and the troubling question of what counted as religious solitude. The collection as a whole broadens and deepens our understanding of the patterns of early modern devotion, and of their meanings for early modern culture as a whole.

Death and Disease in the Medieval and Early Modern World

For more on Psalms and Christian practice at this time see R. Chiu, 'Singing on the Street and in the Home in Times of Pestilence: Lessons from the 1576–78 Plague of Milan', in Domestic Devotions in Early Modern Italy, ed.

Death and Disease in the Medieval and Early Modern World

Juxtaposing and interlacing similarities and differences across and beyond the pre-modern Mediterranean world, Christian, Islamic and Jewish healing traditions, the collection highlights and nuances some of the recent critical advances in scholarship on death and disease.

Biographies of a Reformation

Domestic Devotions in the Early Modern World ( Leiden , 2018 ) , pp . 82-106 and ' Catholic Cultures of Lutheranism ? Confessional Ambiguity and Syncretism in Sixteenth - Century Upper Lusatia'in Kat Hill ( ed . ) ...

Biographies of a Reformation

Biographies of a Reformation. Religious Change and Confessional Coexistence in Upper Lusatia, c. 1520-1635 introduces the region of Upper Lusatia, where Lutherans, Catholics and a range of other groups coexisted in a largely peaceful manner.

Calvinist Conformity in Post Reformation England

... Evangelical Theological Society, Domestic Devotions in the Early Modern World Conference, Puritan Research Colloquium, Vanderbilt University's Early Modern Religious History seminar, and the Ecclesiastical Historical Society offered ...

Calvinist Conformity in Post Reformation England

Calvinist Conformity in Post-Reformation England is the first modern full-scale examination of the theology and life of the distinguished English Calvinist clergyman Daniel Featley (1582-1645). It explores Featley's career and thought through a comprehensive treatment of his two dozen published works and manuscripts and situates these works within their original historical context. A fascinating figure, Featley was the youngest of the translators behind the Authorized Version, a protégé of John Rainolds, a domestic chaplain for Archbishop George Abbot, and a minister of two churches. As a result of his sympathies with royalism and episcopacy, he endured two separate attacks on his life. Despite this, Featley was the only royalist Episcopalian figure who accepted his invitation to the Westminster Assembly. Three months into the Assembly, however, Featley was charged with being a royalist spy, was imprisoned by Parliament, and died shortly thereafter. While Featley is a central focus of the work, this study is more than a biography. It uses Featley's career to trace the fortunes of Calvinist conformists--those English Calvinists who were committed to the established Church and represented the Church's majority position between 1560 and the mid-1620s, before being marginalized by Laudians in the 1630s and puritans in the 1640s. It demonstrates how Featley's convictions were representative of the ideals and career of conformist Calvinism, explores the broader priorities and political maneuvers of English Calvinist conformists, and offers a more nuanced perspective on the priorities and political maneuvers of these figures and the politics of religion in post-Reformation England.

A Companion to Multiconfessionalism in the Early Modern World

So stated, it is no wonder that rulers usually found the second approach more palatable than the first. ... the privacy of their homes they and their families could believe as they pleased and engage in any sort of domestic devotions.

A Companion to Multiconfessionalism in the Early Modern World

This volume brings together recent scholarship on early modern multiconfessionalism that challenges accepted notions of reformation, confessionalization, and state-building and suggests a new vision of religions, state, and society in early modern Europe.

Polemical Encounters

I looked at these dowries in my paper for the conference Domestic Devotions in the Early Modern World (Cambridge, University of Cambridge–St. Catherine's College, July 2015) titled “The Moriscos' (Artistic) Domestic Devotion(s) Viewed ...

Polemical Encounters

This collection takes a new approach to understanding religious plurality in the Iberian Peninsula and its Mediterranean and northern European contexts. Focusing on polemics—works that attack or refute the beliefs of religious Others—this volume aims to challenge the problematic characterization of Iberian Jews, Muslims, and Christians as homogeneous groups. From the high Middle Ages to the end of the seventeenth century, Christian efforts to convert groups of Jews and Muslims, Muslim efforts to convert Christians and Jews, and the defensive efforts of these communities to keep their members within the faiths led to the production of numerous polemics. This volume brings together a wide variety of case studies that expose how the current historiographical focus on the three religious communities as allegedly homogeneous groups obscures the diversity within the Christian, Jewish, and Muslim communities as well as the growing ranks of skeptics and outright unbelievers. Featuring contributions from a range of academic disciplines, this paradigm-shifting book sheds new light on the cultural and intellectual dynamics of the conflicts that marked relations among these religious communities in the Iberian Peninsula and beyond. In addition to the editors, the contributors are Antoni Biosca i Bas, Thomas E. Burman, Mònica Colominas Aparicio, John Dagenais, Óscar de la Cruz, Borja Franco Llopis, Linda G. Jones, Daniel J. Lasker, Davide Scotto, Teresa Soto, Ryan Szpiech, Pieter Sjoerd van Koningsveld, and Carsten Wilke.

Reformation Reputations

333–57; H. van Asperen, 'The Book as Shrine, the Badge as Bookmark: Religious Badges and Pilgrims' Souvenirs in Devotional Manuscripts', in M. Faini and A. Meneghin (eds), Domestic Devotions in the Early Modern World (Leiden, 2019), pp.

Reformation Reputations

This book highlights the pivotal roles of individuals in England’s complex sixteenth-century reformations. While many historians study broad themes, such as religious moderation, this volume is centred on the perspective that great changes are instigated not by themes, or ‘isms’, but rather by people – a point recently underlined in the 2017 quincentenary commemorations of Martin Luther’s protest in Germany. That sovereigns from Henry VIII to Elizabeth I largely drove religious policy in Tudor England is well known. Instead, the essays collected in this volume, inspired by the quincentenary and based upon original research, take a novel approach, emphasizing the agency of some of their most interesting subjects: Protestant and Roman Catholic, clerical and lay, men and women. With an introduction that establishes why the commemorative impulse was so powerful in this period and explores how reputations were constructed, perpetuated and manipulated, the authors of the nine succeeding chapters examine the reputations of three archbishops of Canterbury (Thomas Cranmer, Matthew Parker and John Whitgift), three pioneering bishops’ wives (Elizabeth Coverdale, Margaret Cranmer and Anne Hooper), two Roman Catholic martyrs (John Fisher and Thomas More), one evangelical martyr other than Cranmer (Anne Askew), two Jesuits (John Gerard and Robert Persons) and one author whose confessional identity remains contested (Anthony Munday). Partly biographical, though mainly historiographical, these essays offer refreshing new perspectives on why the selected figures are famed (or should be famed) and discuss what their reformation reputations tell us today.

Medieval Badges

“The Book as Shrine, the Badge as Bookmark: Religious Badges and Pilgrims' Souvenirs in Devotional Manuscripts.” In Domestic Devotions in the Early Modern World, edited by Marco Faini and Alessia Meneghin, 288–312.

Medieval Badges

Mass produced of tin-lead alloys and cheap to purchase, medieval badges were brooch-like objects displaying familiar images. Sumptuously illustrated, Medieval Badges considers all badges, whether they originated in religious or secular contexts, and highlights the ways in which badges could confer meaning and identity on their wearers.

Sanctity and Female Authorship

Domestic Devotions in the Early Modern World. Leiden: Brill, 2018. Falkeid, Unn. The Avignon Papacy Contested: An Intellectual History from Dante to Catherine of Siena. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2017.

Sanctity and Female Authorship

Birgitta of Sweden (Birgitta Birgersdotter, 1302/03-1373) and her younger contemporary Catherine of Siena (Caterina Benincasa, 1347-1380) form the most powerful and influential female duo in European history. Both enjoyed saintly reputations in life, while acting as the charismatic leaders of a considerable group of followers consisting of clergy as well as mighty secular men and women. They are also among the very few women of the Trecento to leave a substantial body of written work which was widely disseminated in their original languages and in translations. Copies of Birgitta’s Liber celestis revelacionum (The Heavenly Book of Revelations) and compilations of Catherine's letters (Le lettere), prayers Le orazioni) and her theological work, Il Dialogo della divina Provvidenza (The Dialogue) found their way into monastic, royal, and humanist libraries all over Europe. After their deaths, Birgitta’s and Catherine’s respective groups of supporters sought to have them formally canonized. In both cases, however, their political and theological outspokenness, orally and in text, and their public authority represented obstacles. In this comparative study, leading scholars from different disciplinary backgrounds offer, for the very first time, a comprehensive exploration of the lives and activities of Birgitta and Catherine in tandem. Particular attention is given to their literary works and the complex process of negotiating their sanctity and authorial roles. Above all, what the chapters reveal is the many points of connections between two of the most influential women of the Trecento, and how they were related to one another by their peers and successors.

Trust in the Catholic Reformation

The recently published collection of essays on Domestic Devotions in Early Modern Italy (2019) has opened the door to a whole new and scarcely explored world of devotional life and religious initiatives from below, namely that which ...

Trust in the Catholic Reformation

Thérèse Peeters shows how trust and distrust affected reform attempts in the post-Tridentine Church, while offering a multifaceted account of day-to-day religiosity in seventeenth-century Genoa.

The Inner Life of Catholic Reform

Domestic Devotions in Early Modern Italy, 220–243, at 227. 27. Cf. Cooper, “Investigating,” 337; Castani, De Maxima, 28; Wolff, Rugitus, 408; Frederick J. McGinness, Right Thinking and Sacred Oratory in Counter- Reformation Rome ...

The Inner Life of Catholic Reform

"While studies abound about Catholic Reform and its institutional or social history, its spiritual motives and practices, what one could call its "inner life," have been widely neglected. This book examines how these spiritual ideas and practices shaped the Catholic Reform and Catholic view of the world and led to a diverse but peculiarly theological imagination, a new outlook on the self and the world, and influenced human behaviors and sentiments. It tells the story of how the idea of the "inner reform of the soul" shaped a world religion. The historicization of these religious practices and beliefs makes this book also highly accessible to historians and anthropologists. It relies on a plethora of published and unpublished sources, and a wide field of secondary literature. Although the emphasis is on Europe, this book takes a global perspective by integrating material from Africa, America and Asia as it was in this era that Catholicism became a "world religion.""--

Early Modern Privacy

In our texts it is not Condé's religious life that is identified with a priv* word. ... Domestic Devotions in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (Basel: 2020); Brundin A. – Howard D. – Laven M., The Sacred Home in Renaissance Italy ...

Early Modern Privacy

An examination of instances, experiences, and spaces of early modern privacy. It opens new avenues to understanding the structures and dynamics that shape early modern societies through examination of a wide array of sources, discourses, practices, and spatial programmes.

Disability and Art History from Antiquity to the Twenty First Century

Eckstein's “San Frediano,” on the life and miracles of Andrea Corsini, see especially 25–27. ... Ex Voto between Domestic and Public Space: From Personal Testimony to Collective Memory,” in Domestic Devotions in Early Modern Italy, ed.

Disability and Art History from Antiquity to the Twenty First Century

This volume analyzes representations of disability in art from antiquity to the twenty-first century, incorporating disability studies scholarship and art historical research and methodology. This book brings these two strands together to provide a comprehensive overview of the intersections between these two disciplines. Divided into four parts: Ancient History through the 17th Century: Gods, Dwarfs, and Warriors 17th-Century Spain to the American Civil War: Misfits, Wounded Bodies, and Medical Specimens Modernism, Metaphor and Corporeality Contemporary Art: Crips, Care, and Portraiture and comprised of 16 chapters focusing on Greek sculpture, ancient Chinese art, Early Italian Renaissance art, the Spanish Golden Age, nineteenth century art in France (Manet, Toulouse-Lautrec) and the US, and contemporary works, it contextualizes understandings of disability historically, as well as in terms of medicine, literature, and visual culture. This book is required reading for scholars and students of disability studies, art history, sociology, medical humanities and media arts.