Drinking from the River of Light

The Life of Expression

Drinking from the River of Light

A deeply heartfelt weave of reflections and poems about what it means to live the creative, expressive life. “I cherish the wisdom and embrace the practices offered in this luminous book.” —Mirabai Starr, author of Caravan of No Despair and Wild Mercy “Meaningful art, enduring art—and the transformative process it awakens—keeps us alive,” writes Mark Nepo. With Drinking from the River of Light, this bestselling poet and philosopher will lead you on a journey to discover just how art and authentic expression can bring our deepest truths to bear in the world. In this collection of interconnected essays and poetry—covering subjects ranging from the importance of staying in conversation with other forms of life to a consideration of how innovators such as Matisse, Rodin, and Beethoven saw the world—Nepo presents a lyrical ode to the creative urge that stirs in each of us. Whether it’s the search for a metaphor to reveal life’s beauty or the brushstroke that will thoroughly capture the moment, Drinking from the River of Light examines what it means to go “. . . beyond the boundaries of art, where the viewer and participant are one.” Here you will discover: The importance of openly embracing the full scope of your emotions The need for raw honesty and self-exploration in education Why a new perspective always waits only a “quarter turn” away The importance of staying in constant conversation with other creative voices The crucial difference between giving and getting attention Concrete guidelines for respectful peer review What it means to channel the sound of your innermost being—and the universe In Nepo’s words, “This book is meant to be experienced and journeyed with.” Including dozens of journaling prompts and personal exercises meant to enliven the reader’s creative instincts, Drinking from the River of Light traces the search for our most essential selves and the importance of the life of expression to bear witness to the sorrow, depth, and joy of life.

Along the Edge of Daylight

Photographic Travels from Nebraska and the Great Plains

Along the Edge of Daylight

Breathtaking photographs of the Great Plains show the grandeur of prairie and sky, the sometimes subtle, sometimes brilliant colors of earth in the evening light, the enormous scale of the clouds and sun and horizon, and the wild creatures that live in this remarkable environment.

Control of Microorganisms in Drinking Water

Control of Microorganisms in Drinking Water

Prepared by the Water Supply Engineering Technical Committee of the Infrastructure Council of the Environmental and Water Resources Institute of ASCE. This report provides a comprehensive survey of the state of the art in drinking water treatment methods and technologies for controlling microorganisms. Academics, practicing engineers, and environmental scientists offer insight into the risks posed by microbes in drinking water and ,more importantly, their control through treatment and disinfection. The report supplies an overview of the subject for nonspecialists and becomes a valuable technical reference for experienced practitioners. Topics include: Ørisks posed by pathogens in drinking water; Ømicrobially-mediated corrosion and water quality deterioration; Øindicator concept and its application in water supply; Øremoval of organisms by flocculation/sedimentation; Øair stripping and aeration; Øslow sand filtration; Ørapid sand filtration; Øgranular activated carbon/biological activated carbon; Øcontrol of microorganisms in drinking water by pressure-driven membrane processes; Øgeneral kinetics of disinfection processes; Øchlorine and chloramines; Øchlorine dioxide in drinking water treatment; Øultraviolet disinfection; Øozone disinfection in drinking water; and Øemerging pathogens of concern in drinking water.

The Design of The Waste Land

The Design of The Waste Land

The Design of The Waste Land offers a detailed, comprehensive explanation of T.S. Eliot's enigmatic poem. It relates The Waste Land to earlier and later poems by Eliot, demonstrating that the major poems describe a continuous spiritual odyssey or quest undertaken by the same individual, initiated by the moment of ecstasy in the Hyacinth garden. Blistein's analysis of Eliot's sources reveals that the protagonist's glimpse of "the heart of light" is equivalent to drinking from the Grail, or communing with God. The incarnate deity momentarily transforms the Hyacinth garden into the likeness of the Edenic paradise. With the inevitable passing of the moment of communion, the protagonist in effect is expelled from the paradisiacal garden as mankind was from Eden. By contrast, the familiar world appears to him a wasteland. The protagonist seeks to drink again from the divine Source and return again to the garden as it was when transfigured by the divine presence. His is a quest for Grail and Homeland.

New Light on the Early History of the Greater Northwest

New Light on the Early History of the Greater Northwest

A two-volume version of an 1897 publication containing abridged and edited journals relating to exploration of America's Northwest.

The Retreat of the Elephants

An Environmental History of China

The Retreat of the Elephants

This is the first environmental history of China during the three thousand years for which there are written records. It is also a treasure trove of literary, political, aesthetic, scientific, and religious sources, which allow the reader direct access to the views and feelings of the Chinese people toward their environment and their landscape. Elvin chronicles the spread of the Chinese style of farming that eliminated the habitat of the elephants that populated the country alongside much of its original wildlife; the destruction of most of the forests; the impact of war on the environmental transformation of the landscape; and the re-engineering of the countryside through water-control systems, some of gigantic size. He documents the histories of three contrasting localities within China to show how ecological dynamics defined the lives of the inhabitants. And he shows that China in the eighteenth century, on the eve of the modern era, was probably more environmentally degraded than northwestern Europe around this time. Indispensable for its new perspective on long-term Chinese history and its explanation of the roots of China’s present-day environmental crisis, this book opens a door into the Chinese past.

The Adventures of Kele

Boy of the Rock Shelter

The Adventures of Kele

The continuing story of Kele, a boy who lived many thousands of years ago in the rugged area now known as southwest Texas. It is the age of hunter-gatherers and Kele and his clan must live off the land and what nature provides for them and their difficult journey from their rock shelter home in search of a new home in a land far away.

The Name of the Nearest River

Stories

The Name of the Nearest River

Short stories set in Kentucky from a prize-winning author who “writes with generosity and understanding of rural and small town life” (Chris Offutt, author of Country Dark). Like a room soaked in the scent of whiskey, perfume, and sweat, the atmosphere of these stories is at once intoxicating, vulnerable, and full of brawn, revealing the hidden dangers in the coyote-infested fields, rusty riverbeds, and abandoned logging trails of Kentucky. In one story, a man spends seven days in a jon boat with his fiddle and a Polaroid camera, determined to enact vengeance on the water-logged body of a used car salesman; in another, a demolition derby enthusiast watches his two wild, burning love interests duke it out, only to determine he would rather be left alone entirely. Together, these stories present a resonant debut collection from an unexpected new voice in Southern fiction, a recipient of the Thomas and Lillie D. Chaffin Award for Appalachian Writing, the Barry Hannah Prize for Fiction, and the Eric Hoffer Award in General Fiction. “This debut collection pulls readers into rural Kentucky and hammers them with the despair and frustration that drive his fierce, battered denizens of the Bluegrass State.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review) “[Taylor] writes with wit, zest and skill . . . In the long queue of very good contemporary Southern writers, here’s a guy who can cut to the front.” —The Minneapolis Star-Tribune