Duke Ellington and His World

Beginning with his birth in Washington, DC, through his first bands and work at the legendary Cotton Club, to his final great extended compositions, this book gives a thorough introduction to Ellington's music and how it was made.

Duke Ellington and His World

Based on lengthy interviews with Ellington's bandmates, family, and friends, Duke Ellington and His World offers a fresh look at this legendary composer. The first biography of the composer written by a fellow musician and African-American, the book traces Ellington's life and career in terms of the social, cultural, political, and economic realities of his times. Beginning with his birth in Washington, DC, through his first bands and work at the legendary Cotton Club, to his final great extended compositions, this book gives a thorough introduction to Ellington's music and how it was made. It also illuminates his personal life because, for Ellington, music was his life and his life was a constant inspiration for music.

The World Of Duke Ellington

A fascinating portrait of one of America's greatest composer-performers in his own words and the words of the musicians he played with.

The World Of Duke Ellington

A fascinating portrait of one of America's greatest composer-performers in his own words and the words of the musicians he played with.

Duke Ellington s America

Ellington’s own voice, meanwhile, animates the book throughout, giving Duke Ellington’s America an intimacy and immediacy unmatched by any previous account.

Duke Ellington s America

Few American artists in any medium have enjoyed the international and lasting cultural impact of Duke Ellington. From jazz standards such as “Mood Indigo” and “Don’t Get Around Much Anymore,” to his longer, more orchestral suites, to his leadership of the stellar big band he toured and performed with for decades after most big bands folded, Ellington represented a singular, pathbreaking force in music over the course of a half-century. At the same time, as one of the most prominent black public figures in history, Ellington demonstrated leadership on questions of civil rights, equality, and America’s role in the world. With Duke Ellington’s America, Harvey G. Cohen paints a vivid picture of Ellington’s life and times, taking him from his youth in the black middle class enclave of Washington, D.C., to the heights of worldwide acclaim. Mining extensive archives, many never before available, plus new interviews with Ellington’s friends, family, band members, and business associates, Cohen illuminates his constantly evolving approach to composition, performance, and the music business—as well as issues of race, equality and religion. Ellington’s own voice, meanwhile, animates the book throughout, giving Duke Ellington’s America an intimacy and immediacy unmatched by any previous account. By far the most thorough and nuanced portrait yet of this towering figure, Duke Ellington’s America highlights Ellington’s importance as a figure in American history as well as in American music.

Duke

As the biographer of Louis Armstrong, Terry Teachout is uniquely qualified to tell the story of the public and private lives of Duke Ellington.

Duke

A major new biography of Duke Ellington from the acclaimed author of Pops: A Life of Louis Armstrong Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington was the greatest jazz composer of the twentieth century—and an impenetrably enigmatic personality whom no one, not even his closest friends, claimed to understand. The grandson of a slave, he dropped out of high school to become one of the world’s most famous musicians, a showman of incomparable suavity who was as comfortable in Carnegie Hall as in the nightclubs where he honed his style. He wrote some fifteen hundred compositions, many of which, like “Mood Indigo” and “Sophisticated Lady,” remain beloved standards, and he sought inspiration in an endless string of transient lovers, concealing his inner self behind a smiling mask of flowery language and ironic charm. As the biographer of Louis Armstrong, Terry Teachout is uniquely qualified to tell the story of the public and private lives of Duke Ellington. A semi-finalist for the National Book Award, Duke peels away countless layers of Ellington’s evasion and public deception to tell the unvarnished truth about the creative genius who inspired Miles Davis to say, “All the musicians should get together one certain day and get down on their knees and thank Duke.”

The Cambridge Companion to Duke Ellington

emotions about the world and the human self that are grand and logicaland beautiful. ... these wordsbythe British critic Vic Bellerby, taken from PeterGammond's classic 1958 anthology of essays, Duke Ellington: His Lifeand Music.

The Cambridge Companion to Duke Ellington

Duke Ellington is widely held to be the greatest jazz composer and one of the most significant cultural icons of the twentieth century. This comprehensive and accessible Companion is the first collection of essays to survey, in depth, Ellington's career, music, and place in popular culture. An international cast of authors includes renowned scholars, critics, composers, and jazz musicians. Organized in three parts, the Companion first sets Ellington's life and work in context, providing new information about his formative years, method of composing, interactions with other musicians, and activities abroad; its second part gives a complete artistic biography of Ellington; and the final section is a series of specific musical studies, including chapters on Ellington and song-writing, the jazz piano, descriptive music, and the blues. Featuring a chronology of the composer's life and major recordings, this book is essential reading for anyone with an interest in Ellington's enduring artistic legacy.

Louis Armstrong Duke Ellington and Miles Davis

Gender and Sexuality in the Jazz Composers Guild.” American Quarterly 62.1 (March 2010): 25–48. 67. A. H. Lawrence. Duke Ellington and His World: A Biography. New York: Routledge, 2001. 68. Ken Rattenbury. Duke Ellington, Jazz Composer.

Louis Armstrong  Duke Ellington  and Miles Davis

This book examines Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, and Miles Davis as distinctively global symbols of threatening and nonthreatening black masculinity. It centers them in debates over U.S. cultural exceptionalism, noting how they have been part of the definition of jazz as a jingoistic and exclusively American form of popular culture.

Help The Beatles Duke Ellington and the Magic of Collaboration

The fascinating story of how creative cooperation inspired two of the world’s most celebrated musical acts.

Help   The Beatles  Duke Ellington  and the Magic of Collaboration

The fascinating story of how creative cooperation inspired two of the world’s most celebrated musical acts. The Beatles and Duke Ellington’s Orchestra stand as the two greatest examples of collaboration in music history. Ellington’s forte was not melody—his key partners were not lyricists but his fellow musicians. His strength was in arranging, in elevating the role of a featured soloist, in selecting titles: in packaging compositions. He was also very good at taking credit when the credit wasn’t solely his, as in the case of Mood Indigo, though he was ultimately responsible for the orchestration of what Duke University musicologist Thomas Brothers calls "one of his finest achievements." If Ellington was often reluctant to publicly acknowledge how essential collaboration was to the Ellington sound, the relationship between Lennon and McCartney was fluid from the start. Lennon and McCartney "wrote for each other as primary audience." Lennon’s preference for simpler music meant that it begged for enhancement and McCartney was only too happy to oblige, and while McCartney expanded the Beatles’ musical range, Lennon did "the same thing with lyrics." Through his fascinating examination of these two musical legends, Brothers delivers a portrait of the creative process at work, demonstrating that the cooperative method at the foundation of these two artist-groups was the primary reason for their unmatched musical success. While clarifying the historical record of who wrote what, with whom, and how, Brothers brings the past to life with a lifetime of musical knowledge that reverberates through every page, and analyses of songs from Lennon and McCartney’s Strawberry Fields Forever to Billy Strayhorn’s Chelsea Bridge. Help! describes in rich detail the music and mastery of two cultural leaders whose popularity has never dimmed, and the process of collaboration that allowed them to achieve an artistic vision greater than the sum of their parts.

Something to Live For

Track 4 , New Orleans , consists of Ellington narrative and background ( no manuscript known ) ; the manuscript for track 5 ... Capitol Transcriptions , issued on Duke Ellington and His World Famous Orchestra : The Collection '46 -47 ...

Something to Live For

Duke Ellington was one of jazz's greatest figures, a composer and bandleader of unparalleled importance and influence. But little attention has been given to his chief musical collaborator, Billy Strayhorn, who created hundreds of compositions and arrangements for his musical partner, and without whom the sound of Ellington's orchestra would have been very different. Now, in Walter van de Leur's provocative new book, Something To Live For, Billy Strayhorn steps out from Ellington's shadow and into the spotlight. Van de Leur argues that far from being merely a follower of Ellington or his alter ego, Strayhorn brought a radically new and visionary way of writing to the Ellington orchestra. Making extensive use, for the first time, of over 3,000 autograph scores, Van de Leur separates Strayhorn from Ellington, establishes who wrote what, and clearly distinguishes between their distinctive musical styles. "Both Strayhorn's and Ellington's oeuvres," writes Van de Leur, "though historically intertwined, nevertheless form coherent, separate musical entities, especially in terms of harmonic, melodic, and structural design." Indeed, Something to Live For allows us to see the characteristic features of Strayhorn's compositions and arrangements, his "musical fingerprints," and to analyze and evaluate his music on its own terms. The book also makes clear that Strayhorn's contribution to the band was much larger, and more original, than has been previously acknowledged. Based on a decade of research and offering detailed analyses of over 70 musical examples, Something to Live For casts new light--and will surely arouse intense debate--on two of the most important composers in the history of jazz.

Duke Ellington Studies

Lawrence Duval's article, entitled “The Genesis of Jazz,” traces the black origins of jazz through folk music, minstrelsy, ragtime, ... 37 Quoted in A. H. Lawrence, Duke Ellington and His World (New York: Routledge, 2001), 205.

Duke Ellington Studies

Duke Ellington (1899–1974) is widely considered the jazz tradition's most celebrated composer. This engaging yet scholarly volume explores his long career and his rich cultural legacy from a broad range of in-depth perspectives, from the musical and historical to the political and international. World-renowned scholars and musicians examine Ellington's influence on jazz music, its criticism, and its historiography. The chronological structure of the volume allows a clear understanding of the development of key themes, with chapters surveying his work and his reception in America and abroad. By both expanding and reconsidering the contexts in which Ellington, his orchestra, and his music are discussed, Duke Ellington Studies reflects a wealth of new directions that have emerged in jazz studies, including focuses on music in media, class hierarchy discourse, globalization, cross-cultural reception, and the role of marketing, as well as manuscript score studies and performance studies.

Duke Ellington The Notes the World Was Not Ready to Hear

The results are concerts and this book-a biography of both Ellington and Horton centered on their unique relationship and the musical and cultural importance of Black, Brown and Beige and Sacred Concerts.

Duke Ellington  The Notes the World Was Not Ready to Hear

Karen Barbera and Randall Keith Horton were strangers who met on a train. A cordial conversation led to an eight-year collaboration to tell new and enlightening stories about Duke Ellington and to bring his forgotten masterpieces back to life. The results are concerts and this book-a biography of both Ellington and Horton centered on their unique relationship and the musical and cultural importance of Black, Brown and Beige and Sacred Concerts. The book illuminates the historical significance of the compositions that helped create a paradigm shift in American music, race relations and culture. It is an engrossing story of "mysterious callings" that led Ellington to choose Randall Keith Horton as his assistant composer, conductor and pianist in 1973, and the author's serendipitous connection to Horton. Most of us know Duke Ellington as the king of swinging Jazz. But throughout his 50-year career, he also shattered racial barriers and stereotypes, bridged cultural divides, helped audiences feel their shared humanity, and dared people to imagine, if even for just one evening, a world without categories. Along the way he believed it possible and imperative to elevate Jazz and American composers on par with their European counterparts. Like a true pioneer, Duke Ellington took risks to provide music that audiences needed to hear, and in doing so, set lofty expectations for a country that was ill prepared to live up to them during his lifetime.

Music is My Mistress

This is the story of the greatest jazz musician of the past century -- Duke Ellington -- told in his own words.

Music is My Mistress

This is the story of the greatest jazz musician of the past century -- Duke Ellington -- told in his own words.

The Ellington Century

“'Simulated Improvisation' in Duke Ellington's 'Black, Brown and Beige.'” The Black Perspective in Music 18, no. ... Lawrence, A. H. Duke Ellington and His World: A Biography. New York: Routledge, 2001. Lederman, Minna, ed.

The Ellington Century

Explores music produced during the lifetime of Duke Ellington and the pursuit of musicians to keep up with constantly changing modern life.

Duke Ellington for Jazz Guitar Songbook

Includes a bio of Duke by Dave Rubin.

Duke Ellington for Jazz Guitar  Songbook

(Guitar Collection). A cool solo guitar collection of 15 Ellington classics! The arrangements are based on the orchestral recordings, which results in melodic music with single-note lines and hip chord voicings that blend seamlessly. Includes the tunes: Don't Get Around Much Anymore * In a Sentimental Mood * It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing) * Mood Indigo * Prelude to a Kiss * Satin Doll * Sophisticated Lady * Take the "A" Train * and more. Includes a bio of Duke by Dave Rubin.

Duke

Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington was one of jazz’s greatest innovators. Join Bill Gutman as he explores the fascinating life of this legend from his birth at the turn of the century to his death at the age of seventy‐five.

Duke

Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington was one of jazz’s greatest innovators. Join Bill Gutman as he explores the fascinating life of this legend from his birth at the turn of the century to his death at the age of seventy‐five. Interviewing Duke’s friends, fans, and fellow musicians, Gutman documents the progress of a man who dedicated his life to crafting the ever‐changing sound of jazz. Gutman plunges into the history of jazz from its origin in the honky‐tonk sounds of the Ragtime Era to the forms that are widely enjoyed today. Jazz has evolved through the years to become one of the most popular forms of music, with Duke Ellington as chief composer, artist, and perfomer. Gutman’s account of Ellington’s life as it parallels the history of jazz provides a fascinating history for both jazz veterans and those new to the art form.

The Encyclopedia of Popular Music

Road With Duke Ellington (Direct Cinema 1995). FURTHER READING: Duke Ellington: Young Music Master, Martha E. Schaaf. Sweet Man, The Real Duke Ellington, Don R. George. Duke Ellington, Ron Franki. Duke Ellington, Barry Ulanov. The World ...

The Encyclopedia of Popular Music

This text presents a comprehensive and up-to-date reference work on popular music, from the early 20th century to the present day.

Gettin Around

Ellington, Drum Is a Woman, May 8, 1957. 26. Quoted in Edwards, “Literary Ellington,” 3. See also Hajdu, Lush Life, 158–160; Celenza, “Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn,” 14; Lawrence, Duke Ellington and His World, 344–345; Townsend, ...

Gettin  Around

Gettin' Around examines how the global jazz aesthetic strives, in various ways, toward an imaginative reconfiguration of a humanity that transcends entrenched borders of ethnicity and nationhood, while at the same time remaining keenly aware of the exigencies of history. Jürgen E. Grandt deliberately refrains from a narrow, empirical definition of jazz or of transnationalism and, true to the jazz aesthetic itself, opts for a broader, more inclusive scope, even as he listens carefully and closely to jazz's variegated soundtrack. Such an approach seeks not only to avoid the museal whiff of a "golden age, time past" but also to broaden the appeal and the applicability of the overall critical argument. For Grandt, "international" simply designates currents of people, ideas, and goods between distinct geopolitical entities or nation-states, whereas "transnational" refers to liminal dynamics that transcend preordained borderlines occurring above, below, beside, or along the outer contours of nation-states. Gettin' Around offers a long overdue consideration of the ways in which jazz music can inform critical practice in the field of transnational (American) studies and grounds these studies in specifically African American cultural contexts.

The Duke Ellington Reader

Suffice it to say , they acquitted themselves with honor , to the obvious enjoyment of the capacity audience . 49. Richard O. Boyer : " The Hot Bach " ( 1944 ) F ew writers have depicted Ellington and his world as vividly as Richard O.

The Duke Ellington Reader

Includes over one hundred essays focusing on Ellington as a person, musician, bandleader, and musical philosopher, and offering insight into Ellington's position in American musical culture

Encyclopedia of African American History 1896 to the Present J N

Duke Ellington: His Life and Music. London: Phoenix House, 1958. Haase, John. Beyond Category: The Life and Genius of Duke Ellington. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1995. Lawrence, A. H. Duke Ellington and His World: A Biography.

Encyclopedia of African American History  1896 to the Present  J N

Alphabetically-arranged entries from J to N that explores significant events, major persons, organizations, and political and social movements in African-American history from 1896 to the twenty-first-century.