Dynamic General Equilibrium Modeling

In an accompanying home page to this book, computer codes to all applications can be downloaded. "This is perhaps the perfect book to learn how to solve quantitative macroeconomics models.

Dynamic General Equilibrium Modeling

Modern business cycle theory and growth theory uses stochastic dynamic general equilibrium models. In order to solve these models, economists need to use many mathematical tools. This book presents various methods in order to compute the dynamics of general equilibrium models. In part I, the representative-agent stochastic growth model is solved with the help of value function iteration, linear and linear quadratic approximation methods, parameterised expectations and projection methods. In order to apply these methods, fundamentals from numerical analysis are reviewed in detail. In particular, the book discusses issues that are often neglected in existing work on computational methods, e.g. how to find a good initial value. In part II, the authors discuss methods in order to solve heterogeneous-agent economies. In such economies, the distribution of the individual state variables is endogenous. This part of the book also serves as an introduction to the modern theory of distribution economics. Applications include the dynamics of the income distribution over the business cycle or the overlapping-generations model. In an accompanying home page to this book, computer codes to all applications can be downloaded.

Introduction to Dynamic Macroeconomic General Equilibrium Models

This book offers an introductory step-by-step course in Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium modelling.

Introduction to Dynamic Macroeconomic General Equilibrium Models

This book offers an introductory step-by-step course in Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium modelling. Modern macroeconomic analysis is increasingly concerned with the construction, calibration and/or estimation and simulation of Dynamic General Equilibrium (DGE) models. The book is intended for graduate students as an introductory course to DGE modelling and for those economists who would like a hands-on approach to learning the basics of modern dynamic macroeconomic modelling. The book starts with the simplest canonical neoclassical DGE model and then gradually extends the basic framework incorporating a variety of additional features, such as consumption habit formation, investment adjustment cost, investment-specific technological change, taxes, public capital, household production, non-ricardian agents, monopolistic competition, etc. The book includes Dynare codes for the models developed that can be downloaded from the book's homepage.

Identification of Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Models

The dissertation "Identification of Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Models" by Stephen David Morris is divided into three chapters.

Identification of Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Models

The dissertation "Identification of Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Models" by Stephen David Morris is divided into three chapters. The first chapter considers the statistical implications of common identifying restrictions for DSGE models. The second chapter considers the implications of identification failure for Bayesian estimators. The third chapter considers how identification of nonlinear solutions compares with that of linear solutions.

Two Essays on Maximum Likelihood Estimations of Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Models

The first essay focuses on a monetary DSGE model of term structure, while the second essay explores and compares three different versions of New Keynesian DSGE models.

Two Essays on Maximum Likelihood Estimations of Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Models

This dissertation consists of two essays on maximum likelihood estimation of Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium (DSGE) models. The first essay focuses on a monetary DSGE model of term structure, while the second essay explores and compares three different versions of New Keynesian DSGE models. In Chapter 1, a general background is given for the DSGE models, and their estimation techniques along with a review of the term structure models and New Keynesian models. The first essay, which is a joint work with Hwagyun Kim, empirically evaluates the relationships between money, inflation, output growth, and the interest rates of different maturities using a monetary DSGE model of term structure, featuring inflation targeting behavior, asset market segmentation, and external habit extended for nominal economy. This model can generate liquidity effect, average upward sloping yield curve, and time-varying bond risk premia for bearing inflation and real shocks. By exploiting the term structure equations derived from the model, the deep parameters of the model describing risk preference, inflation targeting behavior, and market segmentation between bond traders and non-traders are estimated. The model is estimated under alternative specifications: latent factors; macroeconomic factors; and both latent and macroeconomic factors. The empirical findings show that all the methods give consistent estimates of the parameters, and conclude that asset market segmentation, inflation targeting, and time-varying risk aversion are significant to account for the term structure dynamics. They also suggest that monetary factors and monetary policy are important to understand both short-run and long-run behaviors of bond prices. In the second essay, three different versions of New Keynesian DSGE models are developed, and their structural parameters are estimated by maximum likelihood estimation. Specifically, the role of velocity of money on the dynamics of real variables is empirically examined by constructing a money in the utility model and two special cases of transactions cost model. Wealth effects, previously ignored in many transactions cost models, are taken into consideration in one of the cases examined here, and comparisons are made between the transactions cost model that includes the wealth effects and the transactions cost model that ignores the wealth effects entirely. The equivalence of money in the utility model and transactions cost model with wealth effects is also quantitatively examined. The results show that there is no evidence of quantitative equivalence between these two models. Although the magnitude of impulse responses are different among the models studied here, all three models give consistent estimates for the structural parameters. The empirical findings from the maximum likelihood estimates of all three models' parameters also suggest that the velocity of money is a very important part of the IS and Phillips curves of all three models developed here, and should be included in IS and Phillips curves when examining the inflation and output dynamics.

An Estimated Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Model of the Jordanian Economy

This paper presents and estimates a small open economy dynamic stochastic general-equilibrium model (DSGE) for the Jordanian economy.

An Estimated Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Model of the Jordanian Economy

This paper presents and estimates a small open economy dynamic stochastic general-equilibrium model (DSGE) for the Jordanian economy. The model features nominal and real rigidities, imperfect competition and habit formation in the consumer’s utility function. Oil imports are explicitly modeled in the consumption basket and domestic production. Bayesian estimation methods are employed on quarterly Jordanian data. The model’s properties are described by impulse response analysis of identified structural shocks pertinent to the economy. These properties assess the effectiveness of the pegged exchange rate regime in minimizing inflation and output trade-offs. The estimates of the structural parameters fall within plausible ranges, and simulation results suggest that while the peg amplifies output, consumption and (price and wage) inflation volatility, it offers a relatively low risk premium.