Critical Phenomena

104: Dynamical Critical Phenomena and Related Topics. Proceedings, 1979. Edited by Ch. P. Enz. XII, 390 pages. 1979. Vol. 105. Dynamics and Instability of Fluid Interfaces. Proceedings, 1978. Edited by T. S. Sørensen. V, 315 pages.

Critical Phenomena


Critical Dynamics

Janssen, H. K., 1979, Field-theoretic methods applied to critical dynamics, in: Dynamical Critical Phenomena and Related Topics, ed. C.P. Enz, Lecture Notes in Physics, Vol. 104, Heidelberg: Springer, 26–47.

Critical Dynamics

Introducing a unified framework for describing and understanding complex interacting systems common in physics, chemistry, biology, ecology, and the social sciences, this comprehensive overview of dynamic critical phenomena covers the description of systems at thermal equilibrium, quantum systems, and non-equilibrium systems. Powerful mathematical techniques for dealing with complex dynamic systems are carefully introduced, including field-theoretic tools and the perturbative dynamical renormalization group approach, rapidly building up a mathematical toolbox of relevant skills. Heuristic and qualitative arguments outlining the essential theory behind each type of system are introduced at the start of each chapter, alongside real-world numerical and experimental data, firmly linking new mathematical techniques to their practical applications. Each chapter is supported by carefully tailored problems for solution, and comprehensive suggestions for further reading, making this an excellent introduction to critical dynamics for graduate students and researchers across many disciplines within physical and life sciences.

From Phase Transitions To Chaos Topics In Modern Statistical Physics

H. K. Janssen, in Dynamical Critical Phenomena and Related Topics, ed. C. P. Enz, Lecture Notes in Physics, Vol. 104 (Springer, 1979). 11. P. C. Martin, E. D. Siggia and H. H. Rose, Phys. Rev. A8 (1973) 423. 12. Z. Racz, Phys. Lett.

From Phase Transitions To Chaos  Topics In Modern Statistical Physics

This volume comprises about forty research papers and essays covering a wide range of subjects in the forefront of contemporary statistical physics. The contributors are renown scientists and leading authorities in several different fields. This book is dedicated to Péter Szépfalusy on the occasion of his sixtieth birthday. Emphasis is placed on his two main areas of research, namely phase transitions and chaotic dynamical systems, as they share common aspects like the applicability of the probabilistic approach or scaling behaviour and universality. Several papers deal with equilibrium phase transitions, critical dynamics, and pattern formation. Also represented are disordered systems, random field systems, growth processes, and neural network. Statistical properties of interacting electron gases, such as the Kondo lattice, the Wigner crystal, and the Hubbard model, are treated. In the field of chaos, Hamiltonian transport and resonances, strange attractors, multifractal characteristics of chaos, and the effect of weak perturbations are discussed. A separate section is devoted to selected mathematical aspects of dynamical systems like the foundation of statistical mechanics, including the problem of ergodicity, and rigorous results on quantum chaos.

Non perturbative Renormalization Group Approach to Some Out of Equilibrium Systems

Adv Phys 49(7):815–958. https://doi.org/10.1080/00018730050198152 Janssen HK (1979) Field-theoretic method applied to critical dynamics. In: Enz CP (ed) Dynamical critical phenomena and related topics. Springer, Berlin, pp 25–47.

Non perturbative Renormalization Group Approach to Some Out of Equilibrium Systems

This thesis presents the application of non-perturbative, or functional, renormalization group to study the physics of critical stationary states in systems out-of-equilibrium. Two different systems are thereby studied. The first system is the diffusive epidemic process, a stochastic process which models the propagation of an epidemic within a population. This model exhibits a phase transition peculiar to out-of-equilibrium, between a stationary state where the epidemic is extinct and one where it survives. The present study helps to clarify subtle issues about the underlying symmetries of this process and the possible universality classes of its phase transition. The second system is fully developed homogeneous isotropic and incompressible turbulence. The stationary state of this driven-dissipative system shows an energy cascade whose phenomenology is complex, with partial scale-invariance, intertwined with what is called intermittency. In this work, analytical expressions for the space-time dependence of multi-point correlation functions of the turbulent state in 2- and 3-D are derived. This result is noteworthy in that it does not rely on phenomenological input except from the Navier-Stokes equation and that it becomes exact in the physically relevant limit of large wave-numbers. The obtained correlation functions show how scale invariance is broken in a subtle way, related to intermittency corrections.

Coherent Inelastic Neutron Scattering in Lattice Dynamics

Methods 89, 109-110 Mueller, K.A. (1979): In Dynamical Critical Phenomena and Related Topics, ed. by C.P. Enz, Lecture Notes in Physics, Vol. 104 (Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York) p. 210 Natkaniez, I. ; Bokhenkov, E.L.; Dormer, ...

Coherent Inelastic Neutron Scattering in Lattice Dynamics


Ageing and the Glass Transition

Mod. Phys. 49, 435 (1977) 8. H.K. Janssen: Field-theoretic methods applied to critical dynamics. In: Dynamical critical phenomena and related topics, Lecture Notes in Physics, vol. 104, ed by C.P. Enz (Springer, Heidelberg 1979), pp.

Ageing and the Glass Transition

Understanding cooperative phenomena far from equilibrium is one of the fascinating challenges of present-day many-body physics. Glassy behaviour and the physical ageing process of such materials are paradigmatic examples. The present volume, primarily intended as introduction and reference, collects six extensive lectures addressing selected experimental and theoretical issues in the field of glassy systems.

Statics and Dynamics of Nonlinear Systems

K. A. Müller: "Intrinsic and Extrinsic Central-Peak Properties near Structural Phase Transitions" in "Dynamical Critical Phenomena and Related Topics", Lecture Notes in Physics, Vol. 104 (Springer, Berlin 1979) p. 211 ll.

Statics and Dynamics of Nonlinear Systems

The investigation of the properties of nonlinear systems is one of the fast deve loping areas of physics. In condensed matter physics this 'terra incognita' is approached from various starting points such as phase transitions and renormali zation group theory, nonlinear models, statistical mechanics and others. The study of the mutual interrelations of these disciplines is important in developing uni fying methods and models towards a better understanding of nonlinear systems. The present book collects the lectures and seminars delivered at the workshop on "Statics and Dynamics of Nonlinear Systems" held at the Centre for SCientific Culture "Ettore Majorana·" in Erice;· Italy, July 1 to 11, 1983, in the framework of the International School of Materials Science and Technology. Experts and young researchers came together to discuss nonlinear phenomena in condensed matter physics. The book is divided into five parts, each part containing a few general artic les introducing the subject, followed by related specialized papers. The first part deals with basic properties of nonlinear systems including an introduction to the general theoretical methods. Contrfbutions to the nonlinear aspects of phase transitions are collected in the second part. In the third part properties of incommensurate systems are discussed. Here, competing interactions lead to charge-density waves, soliton lattices and other complex structures. Another point of special interest, illustrated in the fourth part, is the 'chaotic' be havior of various systems such as Josephson junctions and discrete lattices.

Non Linear Dynamics Near and Far from Equilibrium

References Critical Dynamics in Ordinary Fluids 1. K. Kawasaki, Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 611 (1970) 2. J. D. Gunton, in Dynamical Critical Phenomena and Related Topics, Ed. C. P. Enz (Springer, New York), 1, (1979) R. A. Ferrell, Phys. Rev.

Non Linear Dynamics Near and Far from Equilibrium

This text gives a detailed account of various techniques that are used in the study of dynamics of continuous systems, near as well as far from equilibrium. The analytic methods covered include diagrammatic perturbation theory, various forms of the renormalization group, and self-consistent mode coupling.

Magnetic Phase Transitions

M. Suzuki, in Dynamical Critical Phenomena and Related Topics, ed. by C.P. Enz, Springer-Verlag, Berlin (1979). G. F. Mazenko, in Dynamical Critical Phenomena and Related Topics, ed. by C.P. Enz, Springer-Verlag, Berlin (1979).

Magnetic Phase Transitions

The present volume contains the courses given at a Summer School on "Magne tic Phase Transitions" held at the Ettore Majorana Centre for Scientific Culture, at Erice (Trapani), Italy in July 1983 under the auspices of the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society in their series on Materials Science and Technology. The student participants came from West Germany, Great Britain, Brazil, Greece, Switzerland, Sweden, Italy, USA and The Netherlands. The lecturers came from various European countries, Israel, USA and Canada. The atmosphere at the meeting was excellent and a good spirit of companion ship developed during two weeks of working together. The spread of interests among the lecturers and students was divers;jfied but balanced. The main lec turing contributions are reported in this volume. They represent up-to-date reviews in a pedagogical style. In addition, informal presentations on cur rent research interests were made which have not been included. The school attempted to summarize the current position on the properties of magnetic phase transitions from several points of view. The range and scope of the oretical techniques, and of particular aspects of materials or phenomena as observed experimentally were very well put forward by the lecturers. The grouping of manuscripts in chapters does not represent, however, the sched ule followed during the school. Contributions on mean-field approximations and renormalization-group methods either for static or dynamic phenomena can be found at various places in the following sections.

Dynamic Light Scattering

J. D. Gunton, in Dynamical Critical Phenomena and Related Topics, C. P. Enz, ed., Springer-Verlag, New York (1979), p. 1. B. Chu and F. L. Lin, J. Chem. Phys. 61,739, 5132 (1974). H. C. Burstyn and J. V. Sengers, Phys. Rev. Lett.

Dynamic Light Scattering

In the twenty years since their inception, modern dynamic light-scattering techniques have become increasingly sophisticated, and their applications have grown exceedingly diverse. Applications of the techniques to problems in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, and fluid mechanics have prolifer ated. It is probably no longer possible for one or two authors to write a monograph to cover in depth the advances in scattering techniques and the main areas in which they have made a major impact. This volume, which we expect to be the first of aseries, presents reviews of selected specialized areas by renowned experts. It makes no attempt to be comprehensive; it emphasizes a body of related applications to polymeric, biological, and colloidal systems, and to critical phenomena. The well-known monographs on dynamic light scattering by Berne and Pecora and by Chu were published almost ten years ago. They provided comprehensive treatments of the general principles of dynamic light scat tering and gave introductions to a wide variety of applications, but natu rally they could not treat the new applications and advances in older ones that have arisen in the last decade. The new applications include studies of interacting particles in solution (Chapter 4); scaling approaches to the dynamics of polymers, including polymers in semidilute solution (Chapter 5); the use of both Fabry-Perot interferometry and photon correlation spectroscopy to study bulk polymers (Chapter 6); studies of micelIes and microemulsions (Chapter 8); studies of polymer gels (Chapter 9).

Statistical Mechanics of Driven Diffusive Systems

Critical Phenomena, International School of Physics Enrico Fermi,” (ed. M. S. Green). ... To be published, in Scale Invariance, Interfaces and Non-equilibrium Dynamics. (eds. ... Dynamical Critical Phenomena and Related Topics (ed.

Statistical Mechanics of Driven Diffusive Systems

Far-from-equilibrium phenomena, while abundant in nature, are not nearly as well understood as their equilibrium counterparts. On the theoretical side, progress is slowed by the lack of a simple framework, such as the Boltzmann-Gbbs paradigm in the case of equilibrium thermodynamics. On the experimental side, the enormous structural complexity of real systems poses serious obstacles to comprehension. Similar difficulties have been overcome in equilibrium statistical mechanics by focusing on model systems. Even if they seem too simplistic for known physical systems, models give us considerable insight, provided they capture the essential physics. They serve as important theoretical testing grounds where the relationship between the generic physical behavior and the key ingredients of a successful theory can be identified and understood in detail. Within the vast realm of non-equilibrium physics, driven diffusive systems form a subset with particularly interesting properties. As a prototype model for these systems, the driven lattice gas was introduced roughly a decade ago. Since then, a number of surprising phenomena have been discovered including singular correlations at generic temperatures, as well as novel phase transitions, universality classes, and interfacial instabilities. This book summarizes current knowledge on driven systems, from apedagogical discussion of the original driven lattice gas to a brief survey of related models. Given that the topic is far from closed, much emphasis is placed on detailing open questions and unsolved problems as an incentive for the reader to pursue thesubject further. Provides a summary of current knowledge on driven diffusive systems Emphasis is placed on detailing open questions and unsolved problems Covers the entire subject from original driven lattice gas to a survey of related models

Nonlinear Evolution Equations And Dynamical Systems Proceedings Of The 8th International Workshop Needs 92

In Dynamical Critical Phenomena and Related Topics, page 210. ed C.P. Enz (Berlin, Heidelberg, New York: Springer), 1979. [2] K.A. Müller. In Statics and Dynamics of Nonlinear Systems, page 68. ed G. Benedek, et, al.

Nonlinear Evolution Equations And Dynamical Systems   Proceedings Of The 8th International Workshop  Needs  92

This fascinating book presents the unusual career of a scientist of Chinese Malaysian origin, Ho Peng Yoke, who became a humanist and rendered his services to both Eastern and Western intellectual worlds. It describes how Ho adapted to working under changing social and academic environments in Singapore, Malaysia, Australia, Hong Kong and England. His activities also covered East Asia, Europe and North America.Ho Peng Yoke worked in collaboration with Joseph Needham of Cambridge over different periods spanning half a century in the monumental series Science and Civilization in China. Ho subsequently succeeded Needham as Director of the Needham Research Institute, where he held the post for 12 years. In the introduction to the final volume of that series, the Oxford scholar Mark Elvin remarked that Ho “had long piloted the ship through difficult times.” This book tells the story and more.

Nonlinear Phenomena at Phase Transitions and Instabilities

"Structural Phase Transitions," K. A. Müller and H. Thomas, eds. , Current Topics in Physics 23, Springer, Berlin (1981). 5. K. A. Müller, in: "Dynamical Critical Phenomena and Related Topics," p. 210, C. P. Enz, ed., Lecture Notes in ...

Nonlinear Phenomena at Phase Transitions and Instabilities

This NATO Advanced Study Institute, held in Geilo between March 29th and April 9th 1981, was the sixth in a series devoted to the subject of phase transitions and instabilities. The present institute was intended to provide a forum for discussion of the importance of nonlinear phenomena associated with instabilities in systems as seemingly disparate as ferroelectrics and rotating buckets of oil. Ten years ago, at the first Geilo school, the report of a central peak in the fluctuation spectrum of SrTi0 close to its 3 106 K structural phase transition demonstrated that the simple soft-mode theory of such transitions was incomplete. The missing ingredient was the essential nonlinearity of the system. Parti cipants at this year's Geilo school heard assessments of a decade of experimental and theoretical effort which has been expended to elucidate the nature of this nonlinearity. The importance of order ed clusters and the walls which bound them was stressed in this con text. A specific type of wall, the soliton, was discussed by a number of speakers. New experimental results which purport to demonstrate the existence of solitons in a one-dimensional ferromagnet were presented. A detailed discussion was given of the role of solitons in transport phenomena in driven multistable systems, typified by a sine-Gordon chain.

Relaxation in Complex Systems and Related Topics

DYNAMIC CROSSOVER IN DIPOLAR FERROMAGNETS E. Frey and F. Schwabl Institut für Theoretische Physik ... Ferromagnets were among the first systems where dynamical critical phenomena with non classical features were observed experimentally.

Relaxation in Complex Systems and Related Topics

The aim of the workshop was to bring together specialists in various fields where non-exponential relaxation is observed in order to compare models and experimental results and to examine the general physical principles governing this type of behaviour. Non-exponential relaxation is found in extremely diverse physical systems all of which can be classified as complex. The form of the relaxation is generally parametrized using logarithmic, algebraic or stretched exponential decay forms. The conceptually simplest mechanism for the non-exponential decay is a spectrum of relaxation rates due to non-interacting units each of which relaxes with a different intrinsic time constant. Clear experimental examples can be given where for instance the relaxation of a collection of isolated polymer molecules leads to an overall stretched exponential decay. Non-exponential relaxation is observed in all strongly interacting complex systems (structural glasses, spin glasses, etc ... ) where each elementary unit is in interaction with many other units.

Phase Transitions Carg se 1980

Gunton, J. D. (1979), in Dynamical Critical Phenomena and Related Topics, C. P. Enz, ed. (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York), p. 1. Halperin, B. I. and P. C. Hohenberg (1969), Phys. Rev. 177, 952.

Phase Transitions Carg  se 1980

The understanding of phase transitions has long been a fundamental problem of statistical mechanics. It has made spectac ular progress during the last few years, largely because of the ideas of K.G. Wilson, in applying to an apparently quite different domain the methods of the renormalization group, which had been developped in the framework of the quantum theory of fields. The ability of these theoretical methods to lead to very precise predictions has, ~n turn, stimulated in the last few years more refined experiments in different areas. We now have entered a period where the theoretical results yielded by the renormalization group approach are suffi ciently precise and can be compared with those of the traditional method of high temperature series expansion on lattices, and with the experimental data. Although very similar, the results coming from the renormalization group and high temperature analysis seemed to indicate systematic discrepancies between the continuous field theory and lattice models. It was therefore important to appreciate the reliability of the predictions coming from both theoretical schemes, and to compare them to the latest experimental results. We think that this Cargese Summer Institute has been very successful 1 in this respect. Indeed, leading experts in the field, both experimentalists and theoreticians, have gathered and presented detailed analysis of the present situation. In particular, B.G. Nickel has produced longer high temperature series which seem to indicate that the discrepancies between series and renormalization group results have been previously overestimated.