Dynamics with Chaos and Fractals

Dynamics with Chaos and Fractals

The book is concerned with the concepts of chaos and fractals, which are within the scopes of dynamical systems, geometry, measure theory, topology, and numerical analysis during the last several decades. It is revealed that a special kind of Poisson stable point, which we call an unpredictable point, gives rise to the existence of chaos in the quasi-minimal set. This is the first time in the literature that the description of chaos is initiated from a single motion. Chaos is now placed on the line of oscillations, and therefore, it is a subject of study in the framework of the theories of dynamical systems and differential equations, as in this book. The techniques introduced in the book make it possible to develop continuous and discrete dynamics which admit fractals as points of trajectories as well as orbits themselves. To provide strong arguments for the genericity of chaos in the real and abstract universe, the concept of abstract similarity is suggested.

Chaotic Dynamics

Fractals, Tilings, and Substitutions

Chaotic Dynamics

This rigorous undergraduate introduction to dynamical systems is an accessible guide for mathematics students advancing from calculus.

Chaos, Fractals, and Dynamics

Computer Experiments in Mathematics

Chaos, Fractals, and Dynamics

Introduces the mathematical topics of chaos, fractals, and dynamics using a combination of hands-on computer experimentation and precalculas mathmetics. A series of experiments produce fascinating computer graphics images of Julia sets, the Mandelbrot set, and fractals. The basic ideas of dynamics--chaos, iteration, and stability--are illustrated via computer projects.

Chaotic Maps

Dynamics, Fractals, and Rapid Fluctuations

Chaotic Maps

This book consists of lecture notes for a semester-long introductory graduate course on dynamical systems and chaos taught by the authors at Texas A&M University and Zhongshan University, China. There are ten chapters in the main body of the book, covering an elementary theory of chaotic maps in finite-dimensional spaces. The topics include one-dimensional dynamical systems (interval maps), bifurcations, general topological, symbolic dynamical systems, fractals and a class of infinite-dimensional dynamical systems which are induced by interval maps, plus rapid fluctuations of chaotic maps as a new viewpoint developed by the authors in recent years. Two appendices are also provided in order to ease the transitions for the readership from discrete-time dynamical systems to continuous-time dynamical systems, governed by ordinary and partial differential equations. Table of Contents: Simple Interval Maps and Their Iterations / Total Variations of Iterates of Maps / Ordering among Periods: The Sharkovski Theorem / Bifurcation Theorems for Maps / Homoclinicity. Lyapunoff Exponents / Symbolic Dynamics, Conjugacy and Shift Invariant Sets / The Smale Horseshoe / Fractals / Rapid Fluctuations of Chaotic Maps on RN / Infinite-dimensional Systems Induced by Continuous-Time Difference Equations

Encounters with Chaos and Fractals, Second Edition

Encounters with Chaos and Fractals, Second Edition

Now with an extensive introduction to fractal geometry Revised and updated, Encounters with Chaos and Fractals, Second Edition provides an accessible introduction to chaotic dynamics and fractal geometry for readers with a calculus background. It incorporates important mathematical concepts associated with these areas and backs up the definitions and results with motivation, examples, and applications. Laying the groundwork for later chapters, the text begins with examples of mathematical behavior exhibited by chaotic systems, first in one dimension and then in two and three dimensions. Focusing on fractal geometry, the author goes on to introduce famous infinitely complicated fractals. He analyzes them and explains how to obtain computer renditions of them. The book concludes with the famous Julia sets and the Mandelbrot set. With more than enough material for a one-semester course, this book gives readers an appreciation of the beauty and diversity of applications of chaotic dynamics and fractal geometry. It shows how these subjects continue to grow within mathematics and in many other disciplines.

Chaos, Fractals, and Noise

Stochastic Aspects of Dynamics

Chaos, Fractals, and Noise

The first edition of this book was originally published in 1985 under the ti tle "Probabilistic Properties of Deterministic Systems. " In the intervening years, interest in so-called "chaotic" systems has continued unabated but with a more thoughtful and sober eye toward applications, as befits a ma turing field. This interest in the serious usage of the concepts and techniques of nonlinear dynamics by applied scientists has probably been spurred more by the availability of inexpensive computers than by any other factor. Thus, computer experiments have been prominent, suggesting the wealth of phe nomena that may be resident in nonlinear systems. In particular, they allow one to observe the interdependence between the deterministic and probabilistic properties of these systems such as the existence of invariant measures and densities, statistical stability and periodicity, the influence of stochastic perturbations, the formation of attractors, and many others. The aim of the book, and especially of this second edition, is to present recent theoretical methods which allow one to study these effects. We have taken the opportunity in this second edition to not only correct the errors of the first edition, but also to add substantially new material in five sections and a new chapter.

Chaos, Dynamics, and Fractals

An Algorithmic Approach to Deterministic Chaos

Chaos, Dynamics, and Fractals

This book develops deterministic chaos and fractals from the standpoint of iterated maps, but the emphasis makes it very different from all other books in the field. It provides the reader with an introduction to more recent developments, such as weak universality, multifractals, and shadowing, as well as to older subjects like universal critical exponents, devil's staircases and the Farey tree. The author uses a fully discrete method, a 'theoretical computer arithmetic', because finite (but not fixed) precision cannot be avoided in computation or experiment. This leads to a more general formulation in terms of symbolic dynamics and to the idea of weak universality. The connection is made with Turing's ideas of computable numbers and it is explained why the continuum approach leads to predictions that are not necessarily realized in computation or in nature, whereas the discrete approach yields all possible histograms that can be observed or computed.

Chaos and Fractals

The Mathematics Behind the Computer Graphics

Chaos and Fractals

This volume contains the proceedings of a highly successful AMS Short Course on Chaos and Fractals, held during the AMS Centennial Celebration in Providence, Rhode Island in August 1988. Chaos and fractals have been the subject of great interest in recent years and have proven to be useful in a variety of areas of mathematics and the sciences. The purpose of the short course was to provide a solid introduction to the mathematics underlying the notions of chaos and fractals. The papers in this book range over such topics as dynamical systems theory, Julia sets, the Mandelbrot set, attractors, the Smale horseshoe, calculus on fractals, and applications to data compression. The authors represented here are some of the top experts in this field. Aimed at beginning graduate students, college and university mathematics instructors, and non-mathematics researchers, this book provides readable expositions of several exciting topics of contemporary research.

Fractals and Chaos in Geology and Geophysics

Fractals and Chaos in Geology and Geophysics

In this new edition coverage of self-organized criticality is expanded and statistics and time series are included to provide a broad background for the reader. All concepts are introduced at the lowest possible level of mathematics consistent with their understanding, so that the reader requires only a background in basic physics and mathematics.