Elizabeth Inchbald's Reputation

A Publishing and Reception History

Elizabeth Inchbald's Reputation

Through an examination of her complete works and public response to them, Robertson gauges the extent of Inchbald's reputation as the dignified Mrs Inchbald, as well as providing a clear sense of what it meant to be a female Romantic writer.

Quixotic Fictions of the USA 1792-1815

Quixotic Fictions of the USA 1792-1815

Quixotic Fictions of the USA 1792-1815 explores the conflicted and conflicting interpretations of Don Quixote available to and deployed by disenchanted writers of America's new republic. It argues that the legacy of Don Quixote provided an ambiguous cultural icon and ironic narrative stance that enabled authors to critique with impunity the ideological fictions shoring up their fractured republic. Close readings of works such as Modern Chivalry, Female Quixotism, and The Algerine Captive reveal that the fiction from this period repeatedly engaged with Cervantes's narrative in order to test competing interpretations of republicanism, to interrogate the new republic's multivalent crises of authority, and to question both the possibility and the desirability of an isolationist USA and an autonomous 'American' literature. Sarah Wood's study is the first book-length publication to examine the role of Don Quixote in early American literature. Exploring the extent to which the literary culture of North America was shaped by a diverse range of influences, it addresses an issue of growing concern to scholars of American history and literature. Quixotic Fictions reaffirms the global reach of Cervantes's influence and explores the complex, contradictory ways in which Don Quixote helped shape American fiction at a formative moment in its development.

Crafting the Overseer's Image

Crafting the Overseer's Image

The first book-length study of the overseer in four decades, Wiethoff's study bridges historical, legal, and rhetorical scholarship to present a provocative investigation into the multifaceted roles of this oft-forgotten figure in plantation society. Wiethoff canvasses the period from 1650 through 1865 and across a southern expanse that stretches to include the Upper and Deep South. Overseers left scant written evidence about their lives and times, but Wiethoff unearths characterizations constructed by friends and enemies, neighbors and strangers. He also mines the legal record to gauge the impact of legislative and case law rhetoric on public memory.

Chocolate

History, Culture, and Heritage

Chocolate

International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) 2010Award Finalists in the Culinary History category. Chocolate. We all love it, but how much do we really knowabout it? In addition to pleasing palates since ancient times,chocolate has played an integral role in culture, society,religion, medicine, and economic development across the Americas,Africa, Asia, and Europe. In 1998, the Chocolate History Group was formed by theUniversity of California, Davis, and Mars, Incorporated to documentthe fascinating story and history of chocolate. This book featuresfifty-seven essays representing research activities andcontributions from more than 100 members of the group. Thesecontributors draw from their backgrounds in such diverse fields asanthropology, archaeology, biochemistry, culinary arts, genderstudies, engineering, history, linguistics, nutrition, andpaleography. The result is an unparalleled, scholarly examinationof chocolate, beginning with ancient pre-Columbian civilizationsand ending with twenty-first-century reports. Here is a sampling of some of the fascinating topics exploredinside the book: Ancient gods and Christian celebrations: chocolate andreligion Chocolate and the Boston smallpox epidemic of 1764 Chocolate pots: reflections of cultures, values, and times Pirates, prizes, and profits: cocoa and early American eastcoast trade Blood, conflict, and faith: chocolate in the southeast andsouthwest borderlands of North America Chocolate in France: evolution of a luxury product Development of concept maps and the chocolate researchportal Not only does this book offer careful documentation, it alsofeatures new and previously unpublished information andinterpretations of chocolate history. Moreover, it offers a wealthof unusual and interesting facts and folklore about one of theworld's favorite foods.

Separating Power

Essays on the Founding Period

Separating Power

Casper offers a clear portrait of the issues of separation of power along functional lines--legislative, executive, and judicial--in the founding period, as well as a suggestion that in modern times we should be reluctant to tie separation of powers notions to their own procrustean bed.

Dangerous Guests

Enemy Captives and Revolutionary Communities during the War for Independence

Dangerous Guests

In Dangerous Guests, Ken Miller reveals how wartime pressures nurtured a budding patriotism in the ethnically diverse revolutionary community of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. During the War for Independence, American revolutionaries held more than thirteen thousand prisoners—both British regulars and their so-called Hessian auxiliaries—in makeshift detention camps far from the fighting. As the Americans’ principal site for incarcerating enemy prisoners of war, Lancaster stood at the nexus of two vastly different revolutionary worlds: one national, the other intensely local. Captives came under the control of local officials loosely supervised by state and national authorities. Concentrating the prisoners in the heart of their communities brought the revolutionaries’ enemies to their doorstep, with residents now facing a daily war at home. Many prisoners openly defied their hosts, fleeing, plotting, and rebelling, often with the clandestine support of local loyalists. By early 1779, General George Washington, furious over the captives’ ongoing attempts to subvert the American war effort, branded them "dangerous guests in the bowels of our Country." The challenge of creating an autonomous national identity in the newly emerging United States was nowhere more evident than in Lancaster, where the establishment of a detention camp served as a flashpoint for new conflict in a community already unsettled by stark ethnic, linguistic, and religious differences. Many Lancaster residents soon sympathized with the Hessians detained in their town while the loyalist population considered the British detainees to be the true patriots of the war. Miller demonstrates that in Lancaster, the notably local character of the war reinforced not only preoccupations with internal security but also novel commitments to cause and country.

Income Tax in Common Law Jurisdictions: Volume 1, From the Origins to 1820

Income Tax in Common Law Jurisdictions: Volume 1, From the Origins to 1820

This book was first published in 2006. Many common law countries inherited British income tax rules. Whether the inheritance was direct or indirect, the rationale and origins of some of the central rules seem almost lost in history. Commonly, they are simply explained as being of British origin without more, but even in Britain the origins of some of these rules are less than clear. This book traces the roots of the income tax and its precursors in Britain and in its former colonies to 1820. Harris focuses on four issues that are central to common law income taxes and which are of particular current relevance: the capital/revenue distinction, the taxation of corporations, taxation on both a source and residence basis, and the schedular approach to taxation. He uses an historical perspective to make observations about the future direction of income tax in the modern world.