Early Christian Writings

Letters and essays document the founding traditions, beliefs, and practices of the early church.

Early Christian Writings

Letters and essays document the founding traditions, beliefs, and practices of the early church.

Early Christian Writings

Here Clement makes the bird typical of the general resurrection of all believers, though later writers prefer a more specific application to the Person of Christ. 15. Literally 'the Writings', the general name for Old Testament books ...

Early Christian Writings

The writings in this volume cast a glimmer of light upon the emerging traditions and organization of the infant church, during an otherwise little-known period of its development. A selection of letters and small-scale theological treatises from a group known as the Apostolic Fathers, several of whom were probably disciples of the Apostles, they provide a first-hand account of the early Church and outline a form of early Christianity still drawing on the theology and traditions of its parent religion, Judaism. Included here are the first Epistle of Bishop Clement of Rome, an impassioned plea for harmony; The Epistle of Polycarp; The Epistle of Barnabas; The Didache; and the Seven Epistles written by Ignatius of Antioch - among them his moving appeal to the Romans that they grant him a martyr's death.

The Cambridge Edition of Early Christian Writings Volume 4 Christ Chalcedon and Beyond

Christ: Chalcedon and Beyond The Cambridge Edition of Early Christian Writings provides the definitive anthology of early Christian texts, from ca. 100 ce to ca. 650 ce. its volumes reflect the cultural, intellectual, and linguistic ...

The Cambridge Edition of Early Christian Writings  Volume 4  Christ  Chalcedon and Beyond

The Cambridge Edition of Early Christian Writings provides the definitive anthology of early Christian texts from ca. 100 CE to ca. 650 CE. Its volumes reflect the cultural, intellectual, and linguistic diversity of early Christianity, and are organized thematically on the topics of God, Practice, Christ, Community, Reading, and Creation. The series expands the pool of source material to include not only Greek and Latin writings, but also Syriac and Coptic texts. Additionally, the series rejects a theologically normative view by juxtaposing texts that were important in antiquity but later deemed 'heretical' with orthodox texts. The translations are accompanied by introductions, notes, suggestions for further reading, and scriptural indices. The fourth volume focuses on early Christian reflection on Christ as God incarnate from ca. 450 CE to the eighth century. It will be an invaluable resource for students and academic researchers in early Christian studies, history of Christianity, theology and religious studies, and late antique Roman history.

The Cambridge Edition of Early Christian Writings Volume 2 Practice

Most of the texts in this volume were chosen because they illustrate features of early Christian practice that would become important in later Christian tradition. But many of these texts show such practices in the earliest moments that ...

The Cambridge Edition of Early Christian Writings  Volume 2  Practice

The Cambridge Edition of Early Christian Writings provides definitive anthology of early Christian texts, from c.100 to 650 CE. Its six volumes reflect the cultural, intellectual and linguistic diversity of early Christianity and are organized thematically on the topics of God, practice, Christ, community, reading and creation. The series expands the pool of source material to include not only Greek and Latin writings, but also Syriac and Coptic texts. Additionally, the series rejects a theologically normative view by juxtaposing texts that were important in antiquity but later deemed 'heretical', with orthodox texts. The translations are accompanied by introductions, notes, suggestions for further reading and scriptural indices. The second volume is focused on the topic of practice, including texts on education, advice, forming communities and instructing congregations. It will be an invaluable resource for students, academic researchers in early Christian studies, history of Christianity, theology, religious studies and late antique Roman history.

The Cambridge Edition of Early Christian Writings Volume 3 Christ Through the Nestorian Controversy

the true reality of incarnation. the Epistle to Diognetus is an early Christian apology in epistolary form that ... examples of the early Christian use of testimonia, passages from the hebrew scriptures that are applied to Christ in an ...

The Cambridge Edition of Early Christian Writings  Volume 3  Christ  Through the Nestorian Controversy

The Cambridge Edition of Early Christian Writings provides the definitive anthology of early Christian texts from ca. 100 CE to ca. 650 CE. Its volumes reflect the cultural, intellectual, and linguistic diversity of early Christianity, and are organized thematically on the topics of God, Practice, Christ, Community, Reading, and Creation. The series expands the pool of source material to include not only Greek and Latin writings, but also Syriac and Coptic texts. Additionally, the series rejects a theologically normative view by juxtaposing texts that were important in antiquity but later deemed 'heretical' with orthodox texts. The translations are accompanied by introductions, notes, suggestions for further reading, and scriptural indices. The third volume focuses on early Christian reflection on Christ as God incarnate from the first century to ca. 450 CE. It will be an invaluable resource for students and academic researchers in early Christian studies, history of Christianity, theology and religious studies, and late antique Roman history.

Philo of Alexandria and the Construction of Jewishness in Early Christian Writings

Do with Jerusalem: Essays on Classical, Jewish, and Early Christian Art and Archaeology in Honor of Gideon Foerster. Sterling, VA: Peeters, 2003. Foster, Paul. “The Epistle to Diognetus.” Writings of the Apostolic Fathers.

Philo of Alexandria and the Construction of Jewishness in Early Christian Writings

Philo of Alexandria and the Construction of Jewishness in Early Christian Writings investigates portrayals of the first-century philosopher and exegete Philo of Alexandria, in the writings of Clement of Alexandria, Origen, and Eusebius. It argues that early Christian invocations of Philo are best understood not as attempts simply to claim an illustrious Jew for the Christian fold, but as examples of ongoing efforts to define the continuities and distinctive features of Christian beliefs and practices in relation to those of the Jews. This study takes as its starting point the curious fact that none of the first three Christians to mention Philo refer to him unambiguously as a Jew. Clement, the first in the Christian tradition to openly cite Philo's works, refers to him twice as a Pythagorean. Origen, who mentions Philo by name only three times, makes far more frequent reference to him in the guise of an anonymous "one who came before us." Eusebius, who invokes Philo on many more occasions than does Clement or Origen, most often refers to Philo as a Hebrew. These epithets construct Philo as an alternative "near-other" to both Christians and Jews, through whom ideas and practices may be imported to the former from the latter, all the while establishing boundaries between the "Christian" and "Jewish" ways of life. The portraits of Philo offered by each author reveal ongoing processes of difference-making and difference-effacing that constituted not only the construction of the Jewish "other," but also the Christian "self."

The Cambridge Edition of Early Christian Writings Volume 1 God

We hear of “teachers” within Christian communities from the faith's earliest documents. ... Justin Martyr – Greek-speaking Christians in the city of Rome – produced writings that contained speculation about the unity and nature of God.

The Cambridge Edition of Early Christian Writings  Volume 1  God

The Cambridge Edition of Early Christian Writings provides the definitive anthology of early Christian texts, from c.100 to 650 CE. Its six volumes reflect the cultural, intellectual and linguistic diversity of early Christianity and are organized thematically on the topics of God, practice, Christ, community, reading and creation. The series expands the pool of source material to include not only Greek and Latin writings, but also Syriac and Coptic texts. Additionally, the series rejects a theologically normative view by juxtaposing texts that were important in antiquity but later deemed 'heretical', with orthodox texts. The translations are accompanied by introductions, notes, suggestions for further reading and scriptural indices. The first volume focuses on early Christian writings about God's nature and unity, and the meaning of faith. It will be an invaluable resource for students and academic researchers in early Christian studies, history of Christianity, theology, religious studies and late antique Roman history.

Feminist Companion to the New Testament and Early Christian Writings

In accordance with the cultural milieu of the time, early Christians felt free to compose and expand the traditions of ... A similar observation is offered by M. Eugene Boring, who suggests that the purpose of writing the gospel was to ...

Feminist Companion to the New Testament and Early Christian Writings


The New Testament and Other Early Christian Writings

We know of some second- and third-century Christian communities, for example, that accepted only one of our canonical Gospels as authoritative ... And it is not fully representative of the views and writings of the early Christians.

The New Testament and Other Early Christian Writings

The twenty-seven books of the New Testament were not the only writings produced by early Christians. Nor were they the only ones to be accepted, at one time or another, as sacred Scripture. Unfortunately, nearly all the other early Christian writings have been lost or destroyed. Butapproximately twenty-five books written at about the same time as the New Testament have survived--books that reveal the rich diversity of early Christian views about God, Jesus, the world, salvation, ethics, and ritual practice.This reader presents, for the first time in one volume, every Christian writing known to have been produced during the first hundred years of the church (30-130 C.E.). In addition to the New Testament itself, it includes other, noncanonical Gospels, Acts, Epistles, and Apocalypses, as well asadditional important writings, such as those of the Apostolic Fathers. Each text is provided in an up-to-date and readable translation (including the NRSV for the New Testament), and introduced with a succinct and incisive discussion of its author, date of composition, and overarching themes. Thissecond edition adds The Martyrdom of Polycarp, an important text that will enhance the collection's utility in the classroom. It also features Ehrman's new, accessible translations of many of the noncanonical works and provides updated introductions that incorporate the most recent scholarship.With an opening overview that shows how the canon of the New Testament came to be formulated--the process by which some Christian books came to be regarded as sacred Scripture whereas others came to be excluded--this accessible reader will meet the needs of students, scholars, and generalreaders alike. An ideal primary text for courses in the New Testament, Christian Origins, and Early Church History, it can be used in conjunction with its companion volume, the author's The New Testament: A Historical Introduction to the Early Christian Writings, 3/e (OUP, 2003).

Plutarch s Ethical Writings and Early Christian Literature

PREFACE The present volume on Plutarch's ethical writings is the result of a research project begun after the completion of a previous volume in this monograph series , Plutarch's Theological Writings and Early Christian Literature ...

Plutarch s Ethical Writings and Early Christian Literature


The Oxford Handbook of Early Christian Studies

In addition to 'canonizing' selected Jewish scriptures, the early Christian movement also canonized selected writings composed by early Christians. The basic narrative of 'how' this happened is relatively non-controversial.

The Oxford Handbook of Early Christian Studies

The Oxford Handbook of Early Christian Studies responds to and celebrates the explosion of research in this inter-disciplinary field over recent decades. It is thematically arranged to encompass history, literature, thought, practices, and material culture. Whilst the burgeoning of scholarly work has made it impossible for any one scholar to maintain expertise in every aspect of the discipline, this handbook seeks to aid both the new researcher in the field andthe scholar entering an unfamiliar sub-specialty. Each chapter orients readers to the current 'state of the question' in a given area, reflecting on key research issues to date, highlighting primarysources and giving suggestions as to the likely direction of future work. The Handbook takes the period 100 to 600 CE as a chronological span and examines the vast geographical area impacted by the early church, in Western and Eastern late antiquity.

Early Christian Rhetoric

It is true that when modern scholarship began to give particular attention to our earliest Christian writings and their styles , it naturally sought for resemblances in the pagan Greek writings that were contemporary .

Early Christian Rhetoric

An illuminating New Testament study depicts the power and beauty of language that speaks with the words of God and man. Words call man to battle or summon him to prayer. More and more, today man is analyzing his language and asking: What is the purpose of language? What do the words we speak mean? What is their religious significance? Dr. Wilder's extraordinary work attempts to answer these questions and, in particular, to study the qualities of the language that ushered in a new religion, the early Christian faith.

The Oxford Handbook of Early Christian Biblical Interpretation

Earliest. Writings. and. Collections. Jesus' commission to his disciples was to teach and baptize (Matt 28.18–19), not to write. The earliest Christian writings, which eventually constituted the NT, arose out of various subsequent ...

The Oxford Handbook of Early Christian Biblical Interpretation

The Bible was the essence of virtually every aspect of the life of the early churches. The Oxford Handbook of Early Christian Biblical Interpretation explores a wide array of themes related to the reception, canonization, interpretation, uses, and legacies of the Bible in early Christianity. Each section contains overviews and cutting-edge scholarship that expands understanding of the field. Part One examines the material text transmitted, translated, and invested with authority, and the very conceptualization of sacred Scripture as God's word for the church. Part Two looks at the culture and disciplines or science of interpretation in representative exegetical traditions. Part Three addresses the diverse literary and non-literary modes of interpretation, while Part Four canvasses the communal background and foreground of early Christian interpretation, where the Bible was paramount in shaping normative Christian identity. Part Five assesses the determinative role of the Bible in major developments and theological controversies in the life of the churches. Part Six returns to interpretation proper and samples how certain abiding motifs from within scriptural revelation were treated by major Christian expositors. The overall history of biblical interpretation has itself now become the subject of a growing scholarship and the final part skilfully examines how early Christian exegesis was retrieved and critically evaluated in later periods of church history. Taken together, the chapters provide nuanced paths of introduction for students and scholars from a wide spectrum of academic fields, including classics, biblical studies, the general history of interpretation, the social and cultural history of late ancient and early medieval Christianity, historical theology, and systematic and contextual theology. Readers will be oriented to the major resources for, and issues in, the critical study of early Christian biblical interpretation.

Handbook of Early Christianity

Paul's letters are the earliest Christian writings that we possess , the written Gospels emerging after the deaths of the apostles of the first generation . Toward the end of the New Testament period we see the beginnings of the process ...

Handbook of Early Christianity

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Peter in Early Christianity

Sean Adams examines the representation of Peter as literate, a “text broker,” across several early Christian writings, beginning with references in the Acts of the Apostles, and then turning to texts ascribed to Peter.

Peter in Early Christianity


Jewish Traditions in Early Christian Literature Volume 1 Paul and the Jewish Law

As a result, for instance, scholars began to re-discover the apocalyptic element in the early Christian writings. The discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls not only amplified this wealth of ancient sources but revealed the extent to which ...

Jewish Traditions in Early Christian Literature  Volume 1 Paul and the Jewish Law

Series: Compendia Rerum Iudaicarum ad Novum Testamentum Section 1 - The Jewish people in the first century Historial geography, political history, social, cultural and religious life and institutions Edited by S. Safrai and M. Stern in cooperation with D. Flusser and W.C. van Unnik Section 2 - The Literature of the Jewish People in the Period of the Second Temple and the Talmud Section 3 - Jewish Traditions in Early Christian Literature

Symbolic Blackness and Ethnic Difference in Early Christian Literature

These people and places, south of the Mediterranean, served as symbolic tropes* that generated and reflected an ideology of difference4 within ancient Christian writings. In this book I examine some of the discursive uses of ...

Symbolic Blackness and Ethnic Difference in Early Christian Literature

How were early Christians influenced by contemporary assumptions about ethnic and colour differences? Why were early Christian writers so attracted to the subject of Blacks, Egyptians, and Ethiopians? Looking at the neglected issue of race brings valuable new perspectives to the study of the ancient world; now Gay Byron's exciting work is the first to survey and theorise Blacks, Egyptians and Ethiopians in Christian antiquity. By combining innovative theory and methodology with a detailed survey of early Christian writings, Byron shows how perceptions about ethnic and color differences influenced the discursive strategies of ancient Christian authors. She demonstrates convincingly that, in spite of the contention that Christianity was to extend to all peoples, certain groups of Christians were marginalized and rendered invisible and silent. Original and pioneering, this book will inspire discussion at every level, encouraging a broader and more sophisticated understanding of early Christianity for scholars and students alike.

Orthodoxy and Heresy in Early Christian Contexts

In A Companion to Second-Century Christian “Heretics,” edited by Antti Marjanen and Petri Luomanen, 64–99. VCSup 76. Leiden: Brill, 2005. ... The New Testament: A Historical Introduction to the Early Christian Writings.

Orthodoxy and Heresy in Early Christian Contexts

Eighty years ago, Walter Bauer promulgated a bold and provocative thesis about early Christianity. He argued that many forms of Christianity started the race, but one competitor pushed aside the others, until this powerful 'orthodox' version won theday. The victors rewrote history, marginalizing all other perspectives and silencing their voices, even though the alternatives possessed equal right to the title of normative Christianity. Bauer's influence still casts a long shadow on early Christian scholarship. Were heretical movements the original forms of Christianity? Did the heretics outnumber the orthodox? Did orthodox heresiologists accurately portray their opponents? And more fundamentally, how can one make any objective distinction between 'heresy' and 'orthodoxy'? Is such labeling merely the product of socially situated power? Did numerous, valid forms of Christianity exist without any validating norms of Christianity? This collection of essays, each written by a relevant authority, tackles such questions with scholarly acumen and careful attention to historical, cultural-geographical, and socio-rhetorical detail. Although recognizing the importance of Bauer's critical insights, innovative methodologies, and fruitful suggestions, the contributors expose numerous claims of the Bauer thesis (in both original and recent manifestations) that fall short of the historical evidence.

Early Christian Voices

Essays in Honor of François Bovon David Warren, Ann Graham Brock, David Pao. לל especially those found in the Christian ... And then Françoise Morard presents the text of an early Christian writing that has never been published before .

Early Christian Voices

This collection of studies in honor of François Bovon highlights the rich diversity found within early expressions of Christianity as evidenced in ancient texts, in early traditions and movements, and in archaic symbols and motifs.

Early Christian Manuscripts

Turning to early Christian writings it should be pointed out that neither ôpióvoto, nor (pl).0%m?io appear in the New Testament, although the former is periodically attested in the writings of the Apostolic Fathers (as well as the LXX).

Early Christian Manuscripts

The authors of the nine essays in this collection deal with individual or certain sets of manuscripts in order to demonstrate that approach and method are both crucial and pivotal aspects for a sound investigations. Thus, the essays serve as a variety of approaches destined by their topics, but all of them concerned about acknowledged methods.