The Greek Myths

Endymion, Pelops, Daedalus, Pygmalion – what are the stories behind these and the hundreds of other familiar names from Greek mythology – names that recur throughout the history of European culture?

The Greek Myths

Endymion, Pelops, Daedalus, Pygmalion – what are the stories behind these and the hundreds of other familiar names from Greek mythology – names that recur throughout the history of European culture? In a two-volume work that has become a classic reference book for both the serious scholar and the casual inquirer, Robert Graves retells the adventures of the important gods and heroes worshipped by the ancient Greeks. Drawing on an enormous range of sources, he has brought together all the elements of every myth in simple narrative form, supplying detailed cross-references and indexes. Each entry has a full commentary which examines problems of interpretation in both historical and anthropological terms, and in the light of contemporary research.

Early Greek Mythography Texts

This volume collects together the scattered quotations of the Greek writers of the sixth to the fourth centuries BC who first recorded in prose the tales of Greek mythology (the "mythographers").

Early Greek Mythography  Texts

This volume collects together the scattered quotations of the Greek writers of the sixth to the fourth centuries BC who first recorded in prose the tales of Greek mythology (the "mythographers"). Volume 1 is an edition of the texts; Volume 2, which provides the commentary, will follow in a couple of years' time.

Perseus

Perseus is the tale of the young Greek hero and his adventures. He must face the Gorgon Medusa before rescuing Princess Andromeda and returning home to be king. Medal winner at the Moonbeam Children's Awards 2014.

Perseus

***Winner of the bronze medal at the international Moonbeam Children's Book Awards*** "Perseus" is the first book in the Early Myths collection, a series of children's picture books about Greek myth. Each book tells the tale of a character from mythology and brings the story to life through the inspiration from art and literature. The books are aimed at 4 to 8 year olds, are beautifully illustrated and easy to read. Perseus is the tale of a young boy who has to flee his home with his mother and grows up in a foreign land. To prove his worth he claims he can take on the magical Gorgon, Medusa. With the help of the gods he flies across the lands and faces his greatest challenge, rescuing princess Andromeda along his journey and coming home to claim his throne. This book joins the award winning Early Myths collection. Our second book was Jason & the Golden Fleece. The third book, Odysseus, has received two awards- an honourable mention at the 2015 Royal Dragonfly Books Awards and a finalist position in the 2015 Wishing Shelf Children's Book Awards. Our latest release is "Atalanta" and our fifth book will be launched in late 2016.

Olympians Zeus

In OLYMPIANS, O'Connor draws from primary documents to reconstruct and retell classic Greek myths. But these stories aren't sedate, scholarly works.

Olympians  Zeus

George O'Connor is a Greek mythology buff and a classic superhero comics fan, and he's out to remind us how much our pantheon of superheroes (Superman, Batman, the X-Men, etc) owes to mankind's ORIGINAL superheroes: the Greek pantheon. In OLYMPIANS, O'Connor draws from primary documents to reconstruct and retell classic Greek myths. But these stories aren't sedate, scholarly works. They're action-packed, fast-paced, high-drama adventures, with monsters, romance, and not a few huge explosions. O'Connor's vibrant, kinetic art brings ancient tales to undeniable life, in a perfect fusion of super-hero aesthetics and ancient Greek mythology. Volume 1 of OLYMPIANS, ZEUS: King OF THE GODS, introduces readers to the ruler of the Olympian Pantheon, telling his story from his boyhood to his ascendance to supreme power. This title has Common Core connections.

The Image of Jason in Early Greek Myth

Finley, M., The World of Odysseus (London, 1956). Foley, H., "Medea's Divided Self", ClassicalAntiquity 81, pp. 61-85 (Berkeley, 1989). Fowler, R., Early Greek Mythography: Volume 1: Text and Introduction (Oxford, 2000).

The Image of Jason in Early Greek Myth

This book looks to construct a detailed portrait of the myth of the Greek hero, Jason.This involves examining all extant evidence, both literary and iconographical, for this hero up until the end of the fifth century B.C.

War in Greek Mythology

Delbrück, H., Warfare in Antiquity: History of the Art of War, Volume 1 (Lincoln, NE, 1920). Dougherty, C., 'Sowing the ... Fowler, R.L., Early Greek Mythography, Volume 1: Text and Introduction (Oxford, 2001). Fowler, R.L., Early Greek ...

War in Greek Mythology

Even though war, and conflict generally, feature prominently in Greek mythology, comparatively little has been written on the subject. This is surprising because wars and battles in Greek mythology are freighted with symbolism and laden with meaning and significance – historical, political, social and cultural. The gods and goddesses of war are prominent members of the Greek pantheon: the battles fought by and between Olympians, Titans, giants and Amazons, between centaurs and lapiths, were pivotal in Greek civilization. The Trojan War itself had huge and far-reaching consequences for subsequent Greek culture. The ubiquity of war themes in the Greek myths is a reflection of the prominence of war in everyday Greek life and society, which makes the relative obscurity of published literature all the more puzzling. This book redresses this by showing how conflict in mythology and legend resonated loudly as essential, existentialist even, symbols in Greek culture and how they are represented in classical literature, philosophy, religion, feminism, art, statuary, ceramics, architecture, numismatics, etymology, astronomy, even vulcanology.

Ingri and Edgar Parin D Aulaire s Book of Greek Myths

"For any child fortunate enough to have this generous book...the kings and heroes of ancient legend will remain forever matter-of-fact; the pictures interpret the text literally and are full of detail and witty observation."--"Horn Book.

Ingri and Edgar Parin D Aulaire s Book of Greek Myths

An introduction to the gods and goddesses of ancient Greece.

The Lost Plays of Greek Tragedy Volume 1

Ercolani, A. (2014) 'Defining the indefinable: Greek submerged literature and some problems of terminology', in Colesanti and Giordano (2014): 7–18. Fowler, R. (2013) Early Greek Mythography, Volume II: Commentary (Oxford).

The Lost Plays of Greek Tragedy  Volume 1

Numerous books have been written about Greek tragedy, but almost all of them are concerned with the 32 plays that still survive. This book, by contrast, concentrates on the plays that no longer exist. Hundreds of tragedies were performed in Athens and further afield during the classical period, and even though nearly all are lost, a certain amount is known about them through fragments and other types of evidence. Matthew Wright offers an authoritative two-volume critical introduction and guide to the lost tragedies. This first volume examines the remains of works by playwrights such as Phrynichus, Agathon, Neophron, Critias, Astydamas, Chaeremon, and many others who have been forgotten or neglected. (Volume 2 explores the lost works of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides.) What types of evidence exist for lost tragedies, and how might we approach this evidence? How did these plays become lost or incompletely preserved? How can we explain why all tragedians except Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides became neglected or relegated to the status of 'minor' poets? What changes and continuities can be detected in tragedy after the fifth century BC? Can the study of lost works and neglected authors change our views of Greek tragedy as a genre? This book answers such questions through a detailed study of the fragments in their historical and literary context. Including English versions of previously untranslated fragments as well as in-depth discussion of their significance, The Lost Plays of Greek Tragedy makes these works accessible for the first time.

Greek Mythology

Greek Mythology


Greek Mythology

- The Greek Pantheon - The Trojan War - The Influence Of Greek Drama - Two Greek Mortal Heroes In Mythological Tales This guide succeeds in presenting an overall sketch of the creation of the world and the battles that follow, resulting in ...

Greek Mythology

Greek Mythology is an enormous field of study and a brief guide is a daunting task for any writer. The myths have a way of entwining one with another, and it is difficult to present a coherent story line without feeling one has omitted the best part of the story. Inside you will read about… - What Is A Myth? - The Sources Of Greek Mythology - The Creation Of The Universe And The Gods - What Of Man? What Of Woman? - The Greek Pantheon - The Trojan War - The Influence Of Greek Drama - Two Greek Mortal Heroes In Mythological Tales This guide succeeds in presenting an overall sketch of the creation of the world and the battles that follow, resulting in Zeus taking his place as the supreme god and ruling the earth from Mount Olympus. It covers the creation of man, it seems, as a bit of an afterthought for the amusement of the Olympians and some of the most famous stories that have come down to us via the writings of the great dramatists of the Classical Age. There are concise biographies of the twelve gods that make up the Olympians as well as of the heroes of the Trojan War.

Classical Mythology

"Classical Mythology offers newcomers and long-time enthusiasts new ways to navigate the world of Greek and Roman myths, beginning by exploring the landscapes where the myths are set.

Classical Mythology

Originally published: Handbook of classical mythology. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, c2004.

Early Greek Mythography Commentary

This is the first volume in a set of two.

Early Greek Mythography  Commentary

This volume collects together the scattered quotations of the Greek writers of the sixth to the fourth centuries BC who first recorded in prose the tales of Greek mythology (the 'mythographers'). Volume 1 is an edition of the texts, whilst Volume 2, which provides the commentary, will followin a couple of years' time.Here Professor Fowler presents new texts of Hekataios' Genealogies, Akousilaos, Pherekydes of Athens, the mythographical works of Hellanikos, Andron of Halikarnassos, pseudo-Epimenides, Herodoros, and many other ancient Greek mythographers. The texts are based on a fresh examination of manuscriptsand papyri, particularly of the minor scholia to Homer. Read together for the first time, these texts represent an important and understudied genre of early Greek literature.

The Greek Myths

Drawing on a range of sources, Graves has brought together elements of these myths in simple narrative form.

The Greek Myths

Including many of the greatest stories ever told - the labours of Hercules, the voyage of the Argonauts, Theseus and the minotaur, Midas and his golden touch, the Trojan War and Odysseus's journey home - Robert Graves's superb and comprehensive retelling of the Greek myths for a modern audience has been regarded for over fifty years as the definitive version. With a novelist's skill and a poet's eye, Graves draws on the entire canon of ancient literature, bringing together all the elements of every myth into one epic and unforgettable story. Ideal for the first time reader, it can be read as a single, continuous narrative, while full commentaries, with cross-references, interpretations, variants and explanations, as well as a comprehensive index of names, make it equally valuable as a work of scholarly reference for anyone seeking an authoritative and detailed account of the gods, heroes and extraordinary events that provide the bedrock of Western literature. The result is a classic among classics, a treasure trove of extraordinary tales and a masterful work of literature in its own right.

The Complete World of Greek Mythology

Discusses the origins, plots, themes, and influences of Greek myths; outlines the relationships between the gods, mortals, and their offspring; and includes maps showing the locations of the different stories.

The Complete World of Greek Mythology

Discusses the origins, plots, themes, and influences of Greek myths; outlines the relationships between the gods, mortals, and their offspring; and includes maps showing the locations of the different stories.

Greek Myths

This book contains the stories of Theseus, conqueror of the dreaded Minotaur; the mighty Heracles and his twelve tasks; the tragic lovers Orpheus and Eurydice; Perseus, the Gorgon-slayer; and more.

Greek Myths

The Greek myths are among the greatest, most exciting stories ever told and feature some of the world's best loved heroes and heroines. This book contains the stories of Theseus, conqueror of the dreaded Minotaur; the mighty Heracles and his twelve tasks; the tragic lovers Orpheus and Eurydice; Perseus, the Gorgon-slayer; and more.

The Book of Greek and Roman Folktales Legends and Myths

Amsterdam: VU University Press. Fowler, Robert L. 2000. Early Greek Mythography. Vol. 1. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Frazer, J. G. 1888. “The Language of Animals.” Archaeological Review 1:81–91, 161–181. ———, trans. and comm. 1898.

The Book of Greek and Roman Folktales  Legends  and Myths

The first anthology to present the entire range of ancient Greek and Roman stories—from myths and fairy tales to jokes Captured centaurs and satyrs, incompetent seers, people who suddenly change sex, a woman who remembers too much, a man who cannot laugh—these are just some of the colorful characters who feature in the unforgettable stories that ancient Greeks and Romans told in their daily lives. Together they created an incredibly rich body of popular oral stories that include, but range well beyond, mythology—from heroic legends, fairy tales, and fables to ghost stories, urban legends, and jokes. This unique anthology presents the largest collection of these tales ever assembled. Featuring nearly four hundred stories in authoritative and highly readable translations, this is the first book to offer a representative selection of the entire range of traditional classical storytelling. Complete with beautiful illustrations, this one-of-a-kind anthology will delight general readers as well as students of classics, fairy tales, and folklore.

The Cambridge Companion to Homer

Chapters on Homer in English translation and 'Homer' in the history of ideas round out the collection.

The Cambridge Companion to Homer

The Cambridge Companion to Homer is a guide to the essential aspects of Homeric criticism and scholarship, including the reception of the poems in ancient and modern times. Written by an international team of scholars, it is intended to be the first port of call for students at all levels, with introductions to important subjects and suggestions for further exploration. Alongside traditional topics like the Homeric Question, the divine apparatus of the poems, the formulae, the characters and the archaeological background, there are detailed discussions of similes, speeches, the poet as story-teller and the genre of epic both within Greece and worldwide. The reception chapters include assessments of ancient Greek and Roman readings as well as selected modern interpretations from the eighteenth century to the present day. Chapters on Homer in English translation and 'Homer' in the history of ideas round out the collection.

Greek Mythography in the Roman World

Forbes Irving P.M.C. Forbes Irving, Metamorphosis in Greek Myths 1990 (Oxford 1990). Fowler, EGM Robert L. Fowler, Early Greek Mythography, volume 1: Text and Introduction (Oxford 2000). Gantz 1993 Timothy Gantz, Early Greek Myth.

Greek Mythography in the Roman World

By the Roman age the traditional stories of Greek myth had long since ceased to reflect popular culture. Mythology had become instead a central element in elite culture. If one did not know the stories one would not understand most of the allusions in the poets and orators, classics and contemporaries alike; nor would one be able to identify the scenes represented on the mosaic floors and wall paintings in your cultivated friends' houses, or on the silverware on their tables at dinner. Mythology was no longer imbibed in the nursery; nor could it be simply picked up from the often oblique allusions in the classics. It had to be learned in school, as illustrated by the extraordinary amount of elementary mythological information in the many surviving ancient commentaries on the classics, notably Servius, who offers a mythical story for almost every person, place, and even plant Vergil mentions. Commentators used the classics as pegs on which to hang stories they thought their students should know. A surprisingly large number of mythographic treatises survive from the early empire, and many papyrus fragments from lost works prove that they were in common use. In addition, author Alan Cameron identifies a hitherto unrecognized type of aid to the reading of Greek and Latin classical and classicizing texts--what might be called mythographic companions to learned poets such as Aratus, Callimachus, Vergil, and Ovid, complete with source references. Much of this book is devoted to an analysis of the importance evidently attached to citing classical sources for mythical stories, the clearest proof that they were now a part of learned culture. So central were these source references that the more unscrupulous faked them, sometimes on the grand scale.

Greek Mythology Explained

A deeper understanding: Greek Mythology Explained provides an in-depth analysis of each story told as it unravels the greater themes and valuable lessons hidden within each chapter.

Greek Mythology Explained

Fans of George R.R Martin's A Song of Ice & Fire series and the Game of Thrones TV series will love Greek Mythology Explained, a unique retelling of Greek mythological tales featuring love, betrayal, murder and ruthless ambitions. A fascinating take on classical Greek stories: Discover six classic Greek myths in this exciting retelling that paints both famous and lesser well known characters in a whole new light. Follow the likes of Odysseus, Lamia, Bellerophon, Icarus, Medusa and Artemis as their fates are revealed through bloody trials, gut-wrenching betrayals, sinister motives and broken hearts.

Minor Greek Tragedians Volume 1 The Fifth Century

Early Greek mythography, II. Commentary. Oxford. Francis, E. D. 1975. Menandrian maids and Mithraic lions. Glotta 53: 43–66. Frazer, J. G. 1921. Apollodorus: The Library. Two volumes. London and Cambridge, MA. Fritzsche, F. V. 1845.

Minor Greek Tragedians  Volume 1  The Fifth Century

For the modern world Greek tragedy is represented almost entirely by those plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides whose texts have been preserved since they were first produced in the fifth century BC. From that period and the next two hundred years more than eighty other tragic poets are known from biographical and production data, play-titles, mythical subject-matter, and remnants of their works quoted by other ancient writers or rediscovered in papyrus texts. This edition includes all the remnants of tragedies that can be identified with these other poets, with English translations, related historical information, detailed explanatory notes and bibliographies. Volume 1 includes some twenty 5th-century poets, notably Phrynichus, Aristarchus, Ion, Achaeus, Sophocles' son Iophon, Agathon and the doubtful cases of Neophron (author of a Medea supposedly imitated by Euripides) and Critias (possibly author of three other tragedies attributed to Euripides). Volume 2 will include the 4th- and 3rd-century tragedians and some anonymous material derived from ancient sources or rediscovered papyrus texts. Remnants of these poets' satyr-plays are included in a separate Aris & Phillips Classical Texts volume, Euripides Cyclops and Major Fragments of Greek Satyric Drama, edited by Patrick O'Sullivan and Christopher Collard (2013).