Edmund Curll Bookseller

Edmund Curll was a one-man publishing firm, a figure notorious in his day and something of a comic figure ever since thanks to his enmity with Alexander Pope.

Edmund Curll  Bookseller

Edmund Curll was a one-man publishing firm, a figure notorious in his day and something of a comic figure ever since thanks to his enmity with Alexander Pope. This biography of his life gives an account of his varied and distinctive publishing output.

Edmund Curll Bookseller

Edmund Curll was a one-man publishing firm, a figure notorious in his day and something of a comic figure ever since thanks to his enmity with Alexander Pope.

Edmund Curll  Bookseller

Edmund Curll was a one-man publishing firm, a figure notorious in his day and something of a comic figure ever since thanks to his enmity with Alexander Pope. This biography of his life gives an account of his varied and distinctive publishing output.

The Unspeakable Curll

The Unspeakable Curll


Edmund Curll Bookseller

This is printed by W. J. Thoms, 'Stray Notes on Edmund Curll', Notes and Queries, 2nd ser. ... for publishing two vile and scandalous Books; the one call'd De usu Flagrorum, and the other A Poem in Praise of Drunkenness, ...

Edmund Curll  Bookseller

Edmund Curll was a notorious figure among the publishers of the early eighteenth century: for his boldness, his lack of scruple, his publication of work without author's consent, and his taste for erotic and scandalous publications. He was in legal trouble on several occasions for piracy and copyright infringement, unauthorised publication of the works of peers, and for seditious, blasphemous, and obscene publications. He stood in the pillory in 1728 for seditious libel. Above all, he was the constant target of the greatest poet and satirist of his age, Alexander Pope, whose work he pirated whenever he could and who responded with direct physical revenge (an emetic slipped into a drink) and persistent malign caricature. The war between Pope and Curll typifies some of the main cultural battles being waged between creativity and business. The story has normally been told from the poet's point of view, though more recently Curll has been celebrated as a kind of literary freedom-fighter; this book, the first full biography of Curll since Ralph Straus's The Unspeakable Curll (1927), seeks to give a balanced and thoroughly-researched account of Curll's career in publishing between 1706 and 1747, untangling the mistakes and misrepresentations that have accrued over the years and restoring a clear sense of perspective to Curll's dealings in the literary marketplace. It examines the full range of Curll's output, including his notable antiquarian series, and uses extensive archive material to detail Curll's legal and other troubles. For the first time, what is known about this strange, interesting, and awkward figure is authoritatively told.

The Poet and the Publisher

The book is a forensic account of events both momentous and farcical, and it is indecently entertaining.

The Poet and the Publisher

“Drawing on deep familiarity with the period and its personalities, Rogers has given us a witty and richly detailed account of the ongoing war between the greatest poet of the eighteenth century and its most scandalous publisher.”—Leo Damrosch, author of The Club: Johnson, Boswell, and the Friends Who Shaped an Age “What sets Rogers’s history apart is his ability to combine fastidious research with lucid, unpretentious prose. History buffs and literary-minded readers alike are in for a punchy, drama-filled treat.”—Publishers Weekly The quarrel between the poet Alexander Pope and the publisher Edmund Curll has long been a notorious episode in the history of the book, when two remarkable figures with a gift for comedy and an immoderate dislike of each other clashed publicly and without restraint. However, it has never, until now, been chronicled in full. Ripe with the sights and smells of Hanoverian London, The Poet and Publisher details their vitriolic exchanges, drawing on previously unearthed pamphlets, newspaper articles, and advertisements, court and government records, and personal letters. The story of their battles in and out of print includes a poisoning, the pillory, numerous instances of fraud, and a landmark case in the history of copyright. The book is a forensic account of events both momentous and farcical, and it is indecently entertaining.

A Further Account of the Most Deplorable Condition of Mr Edmund Curll Bookseller Since His Being Poison d on the 28th of March to Be Publish d Weekly

In its determination to preserve the century of revolution, Gale initiated a revolution of its own: digitization of epic proportions to preserve these invaluable works in the largest archive of its kind.

A Further Account of the Most Deplorable Condition of Mr  Edmund Curll  Bookseller  Since His Being Poison d on the 28th of March  to Be Publish d Weekly

The 18th century was a wealth of knowledge, exploration and rapidly growing technology and expanding record-keeping made possible by advances in the printing press. In its determination to preserve the century of revolution, Gale initiated a revolution of its own: digitization of epic proportions to preserve these invaluable works in the largest archive of its kind. Now for the first time these high-quality digital copies of original 18th century manuscripts are available in print, making them highly accessible to libraries, undergraduate students, and independent scholars. Delve into what it was like to live during the eighteenth century by reading the first-hand accounts of everyday people, including city dwellers and farmers, businessmen and bankers, artisans and merchants, artists and their patrons, politicians and their constituents. Original texts make the American, French, and Industrial revolutions vividly contemporary. ++++ The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification: ++++ British Library T005675 Anonymous. By Alexander Pope. A sequel to 'A full and true account of a horrid and barbarous revenge by poison, on the body of Mr. Edmund Curll'. With a half-title. London: printed, and sold by all the publishers, mercuries, and hawkers, within the bills of mortality, 1716. 22p.; 8°

Two Augustan Booksellers John Dunton and Edmund Curll

Descriptors: book collecting, Curll, Dunton.

Two Augustan Booksellers  John Dunton and Edmund Curll

Descriptors: book collecting, Curll, Dunton.

Two Augustan Booksellers John Dunton and Edmund Curll

Not unnaturally the poet was enraged at the bookseller , who in his own copy , now in the British Museum , tells how the manuscripts “ came into his hands ” ( manuscripts had a habit of " coming into Curll's hands ” ) : “ They were ...

Two Augustan Booksellers  John Dunton and Edmund Curll

Descriptors: book collecting, Curll, Dunton.

Curll Papers

Curll Papers


Curll Papers Stray Notes on the Life and Publications of Edmund Curll

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1879 edition.

Curll Papers  Stray Notes on the Life and Publications of Edmund Curll

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1879 edition. Excerpt: ... the Lives, Characters, &c. of Men of this Stamp, than I can pretend to he, I would not willingly anticipate a Thing that will imake so great a Figure, in all Probability, one Time or other, in his full and true Accounts." In place of this, however, we will give some particulars as to his " whereabouts" at different periods of his varied career. As a Bookseller, his frequent changes of residence, as shown on the title-pages of his various publications, would seem to indicate that, with all his tricks and ingenuity, he was by no means a successful tradesman. 1708. This is the earliest date at which we have met with Curll's name on a title-page. A translation ofBoileau'sLutrin was published in 1708, among others by " E. Sanger and . Curll, at the Post House at the Middle Temple Gate, and at the Peacock without Temple Bar." 1709. Muscimda was published by him, "ad insigne ravonis extra Temple Bar." 1710. We find him removed to the premises formerly occupied by the well-known bookseller A. Bosvill; for A Complete Key to the Tale of a Tub, &c. was "printed for Edmund Curll, at the Dial and Bible against St. Dunstan's Church in Fleet Street." Here he remained certainly until 1718; but in 1720, we find him removed to Paternoster Row; where, in that year, he appears to have published Jacob's Lives of the Poets. 1723 shows another removal, for in that year Nichols (Lit. Anec. iv. 273.) states that he lived " over against Catherine Street in the Strand," and ne was living there in 1726, when he published Ashmole's Order of the Garter. In 1728 he is still described on title-pages as "in the Strand;" but Mrs. Thomas speaks of him in 1729 as living "next to Will's Coffee House, in Bow Street, Covent Garden;" and that is the place of publication...

A Narrative of the Method by Which the Private Letters of Mr Pope Have Been Procur d and Publish d by Edmund Curll Bookseller Nb the Original Papers in Curl s Own Hand May Be Seen at T Cooper s

In its determination to preserve the century of revolution, Gale initiated a revolution of its own: digitization of epic proportions to preserve these invaluable works in the largest archive of its kind.

A Narrative of the Method by Which the Private Letters of Mr  Pope Have Been Procur d and Publish d by Edmund Curll  Bookseller  Nb  the Original Papers  in Curl s Own Hand  May Be Seen at T  Cooper s

The 18th century was a wealth of knowledge, exploration and rapidly growing technology and expanding record-keeping made possible by advances in the printing press. In its determination to preserve the century of revolution, Gale initiated a revolution of its own: digitization of epic proportions to preserve these invaluable works in the largest archive of its kind. Now for the first time these high-quality digital copies of original 18th century manuscripts are available in print, making them highly accessible to libraries, undergraduate students, and independent scholars. Delve into what it was like to live during the eighteenth century by reading the first-hand accounts of everyday people, including city dwellers and farmers, businessmen and bankers, artisans and merchants, artists and their patrons, politicians and their constituents. Original texts make the American, French, and Industrial revolutions vividly contemporary. ++++ The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification: ++++ British Library T005693 Attributed to Alexander Pope. With a half-title. London: printed for T. Cooper, 1735. [4],36p.; 12°

Documenting Eighteenth Century Satire

The book ranges across different modes of satire, in poetry, prose and drama. It covers some of the best known works of eighteenth-century British literature, including The Rape of the Lock, The Dunciad, and The Beggar’s Opera.

Documenting Eighteenth Century Satire

Documenting Eighteenth Century Satire provides a historicized view of Augustan satire, through detailed readings of individual works. It aims to show how these satires can be “documented” in various ways to reveal richer meanings. The book ranges across different modes of satire, in poetry, prose and drama. It covers some of the best known works of eighteenth-century British literature, including The Rape of the Lock, The Dunciad, and The Beggar’s Opera. In addition it deals with less familiar but important texts, including Gay’s Trivia, Pope’s Epistle to Miss Blount, and Swift’s poem on Sid Hamet, as well as works of great literary merit which have been unduly neglected, including Pope’s Duke upon Duke and Swift’s The Bubble. One essay offers the first full interpretation and edition of a poem that surfaced in the 1970s, still virtually unknown, written by Pope and/or Gay. Another describes a previously unsuspected hoax by the Scriblerians on the quest for the longitude, while one more finds an unsuspected, but close, link between poems by Pope and Pushkin. Sources are drawn from numerous unpublished documents (wills, private letters, inventories, estate deeds, marriage contracts and private correspondence). Extensive use is made of contemporary newspapers, magazines and pamphlets. Most of these have not been quarried heavily (if at all) before. Some essays are completely new while others have been extensively revised for this book.