Education in Twelfth century Art and Architecture

The scenes of the arts in the outermost archivolt of the portal might be equally read as indicating a desire to promote this place as a centre of teaching. however, if the inclusion of the imagery was inspired by a local school with a ...

Education in Twelfth century Art and Architecture

A study of the representation of education in material culture, at a period of considerable change and growth.

A Companion to Twelfth Century Schools

By magnifying the knowledge and the coherence of the seven liberal arts on parchment as well as in stone, such representations contribute to the affirmation of the ... 12 Laura Cleaver, Education in Twelfth-Century Art and Architecture.

A Companion to Twelfth Century Schools

A nuanced introduction to the schools of the 12th century, insisting on the fertile confluence between ancient knowledge and new techniques and on the interaction between masters and pupils.

Introducing the Medieval Ass

Cleaver, Laura, Education in Twelfth-Century Art and Architecture: Images of Learning in Europe, c.1100–1220 (Woodbridge: Boydell and Brewer, 2016). Cleaver, Laura, 'Disorder in Nature: The Example of the Ass and Harp in TwelfthCentury ...

Introducing the Medieval Ass

Introducing the Medieval Ass presents a lucid, accessible, and comprehensive picture of the ass’s enormous socio-economic and cultural significance in the Middle Ages and beyond. In the Middle Ages, the ass became synonymous with human idiocy, a comic figure representing foolish peasants, students too dull to learn, and their asinine teachers. This trope of foolishness was so prevalent that by the eighteenth century the word ‘ass’ had been replaced by ‘donkey’. Economically, the medieval ass was a vital, utilitarian beast of burden, rather like today’s ubiquitous white van; culturally, however, the medieval ass enjoyed a rich, paradoxical reputation. Its hard work was praised, but its obstinacy condemned. It exemplified the good Christian, humbly bearing Christ to Jerusalem, but also represented Sloth, a mortal sin. Its potent sexual reputation – one literary ass had sex with a woman – was simultaneously linked to sterility and, to this day, ‘ass’ and ‘arse’ remain culturally-connected homophones.

The Art and Science of the Church Screen in Medieval Europe

The Art of Anglo-Saxon England Catherine E. Karkov English Medieval Misericords: The Margins of Meaning Paul Hardwick ... Royal Abbey of Reading Ron Baxter Education in Twelfth-Century Art and Architecture: Images of Learning in Europe, ...

The Art and Science of the Church Screen in Medieval Europe

Fresh examinations of one of the most important church furnishings of the middle ages.

Tracing the Jerusalem Code

Motif Studies and Motivational Strategies for the Teaching of the Middle Ages.” Journal of Literature and Art Studies 3 (2014): 149–64. Cleaver, Laura. Education in Twelfth-Century Art and Architecture: Images of Learning in Europe, ...

Tracing the Jerusalem Code

With the aim to write the history of Christianity in Scandinavia with Jerusalem as a lens, this book investigates the image – or rather the imagination – of Jerusalem in the religious, political, and artistic cultures of Scandinavia through most of the second millennium. Jerusalem is conceived as a code to Christian cultures in Scandinavia. The first volume is dealing with the different notions of Jerusalem in the Middle Ages. Tracing the Jerusalem Code in three volumes Volume 1: The Holy City Christian Cultures in Medieval Scandinavia (ca. 1100–1536) Volume 2: The Chosen People Christian Cultures in Early Modern Scandinavia (1536–ca. 1750) Volume 3: The Promised Land Christian Cultures in Modern Scandinavia (ca. 1750–ca. 1920)

Stone Fidelity

The Art of Anglo-Saxon England Catherine E. Karkov English Medieval Misericords: The Margins of Meaning Paul Hardwick ... Royal Abbey of Reading Ron Baxter Education in Twelfth-Century Art and Architecture: Images of Learning in Europe, ...

Stone Fidelity

Pioneering investigation of the popular "double tomb" effigies in the Middle Ages.

Insular Iconographies

The Art of Anglo-Saxon England Catherine E. Karkov English Medieval Misericords: The Margins of Meaning Paul Hardwick ... Royal Abbey of Reading Ron Baxter Education in Twelfth-Century Art and Architecture: Images of Learning in Europe, ...

Insular Iconographies

Essays on aspects of iconography as manifested in the material culture of medieval England.

The Rood in Medieval Britain and Ireland C 800 C 1500

The Art of Anglo-Saxon England Catherine E. Karkov English Medieval Misericords: The Margins of Meaning Paul Hardwick ... Royal Abbey of Reading Ron Baxter Education in Twelfth-Century Art and Architecture: Images of Learning in Europe, ...

The Rood in Medieval Britain and Ireland  C 800 C 1500

New readings demonstrate the centrality of the rood to the visual, material and devotional cultures of the Middle Ages, its richness and complexity.

Motherhood and Meaning in Medieval Sculpture

The Art of Anglo-Saxon England Catherine E. Karkov English Medieval Misericords: The Margins of Meaning Paul Hardwick ... Royal Abbey of Reading Ron Baxter Education in Twelfth-Century Art and Architecture: Images of Learning in Europe, ...

Motherhood and Meaning in Medieval Sculpture

An examination of women as mothers in medieval French sculpture.

Weeping for Dido

For depictions of this educational scene in two manuscripts, see Laura Cleaver, Education in Twelfth-Century Art and Architecture: Images of Learning in Europe, c. 1100–1220 (Woodridge: Boydell, 2016), pp. 98–100.

Weeping for Dido

Saint Augustine famously “wept for Dido, who killed herself by the sword,” and many later medieval schoolboys were taught to respond in similarly emotional ways to the pain of female characters in Virgil’s Aeneid and other classical texts. In Weeping for Dido, Marjorie Curry Woods takes readers into the medieval classroom, where boys identified with Dido, where teachers turned an unfinished classical poem into a bildungsroman about young Achilles, and where students not only studied but performed classical works. Woods opens the classroom door by examining teachers’ notes and marginal commentary in manuscripts of the Aeneid and two short verse narratives: the Achilleid of Statius and the Ilias latina, a Latin epitome of Homer’s Iliad. She focuses on interlinear glosses—individual words and short phrases written above lines of text that elucidate grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, but that also indicate how students engaged with the feelings and motivations of characters. Interlinear and marginal glosses, which were the foundation of the medieval classroom study of classical literature, reveal that in learning the Aeneid, boys studied and empathized with the feelings of female characters; that the unfinished Achilleid was restructured into a complete narrative showing young Achilles mirroring his mentors, including his mother, Thetis; and that the Ilias latina offered boys a condensed version of the Iliad focusing on the deaths of young men. Manuscript evidence even indicates how specific passages could be performed. The result is a groundbreaking study that provides a surprising new picture of medieval education and writes a new chapter in the reception history of classical literature.

Diagramming Devotion

Education in Twelfth- Century Art and Architecture: Images of Learning in Europe, c.1100– 1220. Woodbridge, UK: Boydell Press, 2016. ———. Illuminated History Books in the Anglo- Norman World, 1066– 1272. Oxford: Oxford University Press, ...

Diagramming Devotion

During the European Middle Ages, diagrams provided a critical tool of analysis in cosmological and theological debates. In addition to drawing relationships among diverse areas of human knowledge and experience, diagrams themselves generated such knowledge in the first place. In Diagramming Devotion, Jeffrey F. Hamburger examines two monumental works that are diagrammatic to their core: a famous set of picture poems of unrivaled complexity by the Carolingian monk Hrabanus Maurus, devoted to the praise of the cross, and a virtually unknown commentary on Hrabanus's work composed almost five hundred years later by the Dominican friar Berthold of Nuremberg. Berthold's profusely illustrated elaboration of Hrabnus translated his predecessor's poems into a series of almost one hundred diagrams. By examining Berthold of Nuremberg's transformation of a Carolingian classic, Hamburger brings modern and medieval visual culture into dialogue, traces important changes in medieval visual culture, and introduces new ways of thinking about diagrams as an enduring visual and conceptual model.

The Arts of Disruption

Cleaver , Laura , Education in Twelfth - Century Art and Architecture . Images of Learning in Europe , c . 1100 - 1220 ( Woodbridge : Boydell , 2016 ) Clifton , Nicole , “ The Romance Convention of the Disguised Duel and the Climax of ...

The Arts of Disruption

The monograph series Oxford Studies in Medieval Literature and Culture showcases the plurilingual and multicultural quality of medieval literature and actively seeks to promote research that not only focuses on the array of subjects medievalists now pursue - in literature, theology, and philosophy, in social, political, jurisprudential, and intellectual history, the history of art, and the history of science - but also that combines these subjects productively. It offers innovative studies on topics that may include, but are not limited to, manuscript and book history; languages and literatures of the global Middle Ages; race and the post-colonial; the digital humanities, media and performance; music; medicine; the history of affect and the emotions; the literature and practices of devotion; the theory and history of gender and sexuality, ecocriticism and the environment; theories of aesthetics; medievalism. The Arts of Disruption: Allegory and Piers Plowman offers a series of new readings of the allegorical poem Piers Plowman: but it is also a book about allegory. It argues not just that there are distinctively disruptive 'arts' that occur in allegory, but that allegory, because it is interested in the difficulty of making meaning, is itself a disruptive art. The book approaches this topic via the study of five medieval allegorical narrative structures that exploit diegetic conflict and disruption. Although very different, they all bring together contrasting descriptions of spiritual process, in order to develop new understanding and excite moral or devotional change. These five structures are: the paradiastolic 'hypocritical figure' (such as vices masked by being made to look like 'adjacent' virtues), personification debate, violent language and gestures of apophasis, narratives of bodily decline, and grail romance. Each appears in a range of texts, which the book explores, along with other connected materials in medieval rhetoric, logic, grammar, spiritual thought, ethics, medicine, and romance iconography. These allegorical narrative structures appear radically transformed in Piers Plowman, where the poem makes further meaning out of the friction between them. Much of the allegorical work of the poem occurs at the points of their intersection, and within the conceptual gaps that open up between them. Ranging across a wide variety of medieval allegorical texts, the book shows from many perspectives allegory's juxtaposition of the heterogeneous and its questioning of supposed continuities.

The Illustrated Afterlife of Terence s Comedies 800 1200

Cleaver, Education in Twelfth-Century Art and Architecture, 93–95. For Bernard Silvestris at Tours, see Mark Kauntze, “Bernard and the Schools of Tours,” chap. 1 in Authority and Imitation: A Study of the Cosmographia of Bernardis ...

The Illustrated Afterlife of Terence   s Comedies  800   1200

This is a book about Roman comedy, ancient theatre imagery, and seven medieval illustrated manuscripts of Terence’s six Latin comedies. These manuscript illustrations, made between 800 and 1200, enabled their medieval readers to view these comedies as “mirrors of life”.

Medieval Architecture Medieval Learning

MacKinney , L. C. Bishop Fulbert and Education at the School of Chartres . Notre Dame , Ind . , 1957 . ... Religious Art in France : The Twelfth Century . Princeton , 1978 . ... Medieval Art and Architecture at Canterbury before 1220 .

Medieval Architecture  Medieval Learning

The 11th and 12th centuries witnessed a transformation of European culture, from architecture and the visual arts to history, philosophy, theology and even law.

Faith Freedom and Higher Education

Significant changes in vernacular poetry, liturgy, law, art, architecture, logic, and even in perceptions of the ... Radding and Clark, Medieval Architecture, Medieval Learning proposes a picture in which they are not simply part of a ...

Faith  Freedom  and Higher Education

While debates abound today over the cost, purpose, and effectiveness of higher education, often lost in this conversation is a critical question: Should higher education attempt to shape students' moral and spiritual character in any systematic manner as in the past, or focus upon equipping students with mere technical knowledge? Faith, Freedom, and Higher Education argues that Christianity can still play an important role in contemporary American higher education. George M. Marsden, D. G. Hart, and George H. Nash, among its authors, analyze the debate over the secularization of the university and the impact of liberal Protestantism and fundamentalism on the American academy during the twentieth century. Contributors also assess how the ideas of Dorothy Sayers, C. S. Lewis, Wendell Berry, and Allan Bloom can be used to improve Christian higher education. Finally, the volume examines the contributions Christian faith can make to collegiate education and outlines how Christian institutions can preserve their religious mission while striving for academic excellence.

Children and Their Art Art Education for Elementary and Middle Schools

For example, in West Africa, the kingdoms of the Yoruba and Benin peoples date back to the twelfth century and have produced impressive works of architecture, sculpture, personal adornment, ...

Children and Their Art  Art Education for Elementary and Middle Schools

A trusted guide and companion for current and future art educators, CHILDREN AND THEIR ART presents a professional approach to teaching art consistent with national standards for student learning. This Ninth Edition is targeted at middle level and elementary schools. The authors are experienced as art teachers in the public schools and have a broad knowledge about school art programs. The Ninth Edition provides updated developments in theory, research and practices, with a strong emphasis on how digital technology provides new ways of teaching art. The most comprehensive textbook available for teaching art education methods, CHILDREN AND THEIR ART covers all aspects of teaching art in the elementary and middle school classroom: the basic principles and goals of art education, the characteristics and needs of children as learners, the core principles of art as a subject--aesthetics, principles of design, art history, new developments in art media and technology. It also covers all aspects of instruction: curriculum planning, sample lessons, suggested readings, and internet resources. Among numerous updates throughout the text, the Ninth Edition features a brand-new chapter on new media in art education with 22 new images. It features the use of digital technology in elementary and middle school classrooms and examples of digital art created by students. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Art and Industry 1885 Drawing in the public schools

Ceasing to be only the servant of the monks , it had become a fellow workman with the people ; and a distinctive national architecture had sprung into being in France , as early as the thirteenth century : -an architecture no longer ...

Art and Industry   1885  Drawing in the public schools


Decoding Astronomy in Art and Architecture

Kuhnel, B. (2003) The End of Time in the Order of Things: Science and Eschatology in Early Medieval Art, ... MacKinney, L. (1957) “Bishop Fulbert and Education at the School of Chartres”, Texts and Studies in the History of Mediaeval ...

Decoding Astronomy in Art and Architecture

For centuries, our ancestors carefully observed the movements of the heavens and wove that astronomical knowledge into their city planning, architecture, mythology, paintings, sculpture, and poetry. This book uncovers the hidden messages and advanced science encoded within these sacred spaces, showing how the rhythmic motions of the night sky played a central role across many different cultures. Our astronomical tour transports readers through time and space, from prehistoric megaliths to Renaissance paintings, Greco-Roman temples to Inca architecture. Along the way, you will investigate unexpected findings at Lascaux, Delphi, Petra, Angkor Wat, Borobudur, and many more archaeological sites both famous and little known. Through these vivid examples, you will come to appreciate the masterful ways that astronomical knowledge was incorporated into each society’s religion and mythology, then translated into their physical surroundings. The latest archaeoastronomical studies and discoveries are recounted through a poetic and nontechnical narrative, revealing how many longstanding beliefs about our ancestors are being overturned. Through this celestial journey, readers of all backgrounds will learn the basics about this exciting field and share in the wonders of cultural astronomy.

Early Medieval Architecture

In the twelfth century people with education or with artistic skills had plenty of opportunities to discover what was going on abroad and they must have been well informed about the architecture of other countries .

Early Medieval Architecture

Drawing on new work published over the past twenty years, the author offers a history of building in Western Europe from 300 to 1200. Medieval castles, church spires, and monastic cloisters are just some of the areas covered.