Elbert County

... Janice Hamm Gallimore, introducing me to the Black America Series: Greene County, Georgia by Mamie Lee Hillman, this work would not exist today. I might have never realized the opportunity to write such a book on Elbert County.

Elbert County

Governor's wife, president's wife, United Nations delegate, teacher, political activist, author, newspaper columnist, business owner, traveler, and mother-Eleanor Roosevelt was truly "First Lady of the World." With her very busy life, she sought peace, solitude, and renewal. She found all three at Valkill, her small stone cottage on the Roosevelt Estate in Hyde Park, east of the Hudson River. A National Historic Site, Valkill is operated by the National Park Service and is the only site in the country dedicated to the preservation of the memory of a presidential first lady.With detailed description and some two hundred stunning images-many published here for the first time-Eleanor Roosevelt's Valkill depicts the events and times of the first lady at Valkill, the place where she felt most at home. In addition, the book traces the development of the site and reveals the depression-era business that was located there, a furniture factory and metal forge known as Valkill Industries.

A Different Race

Elbert County, Georgia, Black American Series. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 2005. Harrais, Margaret Keenan. Remembering Old Valdez. Unpublished Autobiography, n.d. Archived at Alaska Room, Valdez Alaska Library. Hegener, Helen.

A Different Race

The United States needed a road to Alaska so they could defend the Aleutians from Japan. They sent soldiers to build the Alaska Highway. The segregated Black 97th Engineers built the road in Alaska, and when their disorganized white officers struggled to make progress, the army replaced their commander. The new one got the job done but ignored military protocol and discipline, so the army, worried about undisciplined black soldiers, replaced him too. And to put the fear of God into the soldiers, the army trumped up a mutiny charge against ten of them and sentenced them to long prison terms at hard labor.

American Book Publishing Record

Series . HAMM , Aurolyn Melba . 975.8'1630496073 Elbert County , Georgia / Aurolyn Melba Hamm . Charleston , SC : Arcadia , c2005 . 128 p .: chiefly ill . , ports .; 24 cm . ( Black America series ) [ F292.E4H36 2005 ] 22 2004-113561 ...

American Book Publishing Record


The Harvard Guide to African American History

Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, Leon F. Litwack, Darlene Clark Hine, Board of Trustees Professor of African American Studies ... Coulter , E. Merton , " Four Slave Trials in Elbert County , Georgia , " Georgia Historical Quarterly 41 ( 1957 ) ...

The Harvard Guide to African American History

Compiles information and interpretations on the past 500 years of African American history, containing essays on historical research aids, bibliographies, resources for womens' issues, and an accompanying CD-ROM providing bibliographical entries.

Claiming the Union

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Charles Jess Testimony, March 12, 1873, Mary Jess Allowed Claim, Chatham County, Georgia. W. E. B. DuBois, Black Reconstruction in America, 1935; repr., (New York: Atheneum, 1992), 55–86; Benjamin Quarles, ...

Claiming the Union

This book examines Southerners' claims to loyal citizenship in the reunited nation after the American Civil War. Southerners - male and female; elite and non-elite; white, black, and American Indian - disagreed with the federal government over the obligations citizens owed to their nation and the obligations the nation owed to its citizens. Susanna Michele Lee explores these clashes through the operations of the Southern Claims Commission, a federal body that rewarded compensation for wartime losses to Southerners who proved that they had been loyal citizens of the Union. Lee argues that Southerners forced the federal government to consider how white men who had not been soldiers and voters, and women and racial minorities who had not been allowed to serve in those capacities, could also qualify as loyal citizens. Postwar considerations of the former Confederacy potentially demanded a reconceptualization of citizenship that replaced exclusions by race and gender with inclusions according to loyalty.

Historical Collections of the Georgia Chapters Daughters of the American Revolution Vol 1

Seventeen Georgia Counties Lelia Thornton Gentry. by way of Charlotte, thence to Camden where we were ... Came to Elbert County in 1786, thence to Franklin County, Ga., in 1800, where has since resided. Was once drafted but other times ...

Historical Collections of the Georgia Chapters Daughters of the American Revolution  Vol  1

While the coverage of this work extends to seventeen Georgia counties, fully two-thirds of the book deals with Franklin County. Each chapter begins with a brief description of the county records covered, which, in most cases, are among the oldest extant and date from the mid-eighteenth to the early nineteenth century. By and large, the material for the other sixteen counties--Baldwin, Bullock, Clarke, Jackson, Jasper, Jefferson, Jones, Laurens, Lincoln, Madison, Morgan, Pulaski, Putnam, Tatnall, Telfair, and the city of Augusta--consists of marriage records naming the bride and groom, and name indexes to wills and estates.

African American Historic Places

[ CA 3/13/86 , 86000364 ] ELBERT COUNTY Dove Creek Baptist Church Georgia Route 72 Elberton Built around 1880 , Dove Creek Baptist Church began as a small black congregation , many of whose members were former slaves and sharecroppers ...

African American Historic Places

Culled from the records of the National Register of Historic Places, a roster of all types of significant properties across the United States, African American Historic Places includes over 800 places in 42 states and two U.S. territories that have played a role in black American history. Banks, cemeteries, clubs, colleges, forts, homes, hospitals, schools, and shops are but a few of the types of sites explored in this volume, which is an invaluable reference guide for researchers, historians, preservationists, and anyone interested in African American culture. Also included are eight insightful essays on the African American experience, from migration to the role of women, from the Harlem Renaissance to the Civil Rights Movement. The authors represent academia, museums, historic preservation, and politics, and utilize the listed properties to vividly illustrate the role of communities and women, the forces of migration, the influence of the arts and heritage preservation, and the struggles for freedom and civil rights. Together they lead to a better understanding of the contributions of African Americans to American history. They illustrate the events and people, the designs and achievements that define African American history. And they pay powerful tribute to the spirit of black America.

Encyclopedia of African American Religions

HEARD, WILLIAM HENRY (June 25, 1850- September 12, 1937), 35th bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME), was born into slavery in Elbert County, Georgia, one of six children in the family of George W. and Parthenia ...

Encyclopedia of African American Religions

Preceded by three introductory essays and a chronology of major events in black religious history from 1618 to 1991, this A-Z encyclopedia includes three types of entries: * Biographical sketches of 773 African American religious leaders * 341 entries on African American denominations and religious organizations (including white churches with significant black memberships and educational institutions) * Topical articles on important aspects of African American religious life (e.g., African American Christians during the Colonial Era, Music in the African American Church)

Festivals of Freedom

Memory and Meaning in African American Emancipation Celebrations, 1808-1915 Mitch Kachun, Mitchell Alan Kachun ... In Elbert County , Georgia , Dr. James Thompson , a black graduate of Brown Univer- sity and Shaw Medical School ...

Festivals of Freedom

With the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade in 1808, many African Americans began calling for "a day of publick thanksgiving" to commemorate this important step toward freedom. During the ensuing century, black leaders built on this foundation and constructed a distinctive and vibrant tradition through their celebrations of the end of slavery in New York State, the British West Indies, and eventually the United States as a whole. In this revealing study, Mitch Kachun explores the multiple functions and contested meanings surrounding African American emancipation celebrations from the abolition of the slave trade to the fiftieth anniversary of U.S. emancipation. Excluded from July Fourth and other American nationalist rituals for most of this period, black activists used these festivals of freedom to encourage community building and race uplift. Kachun demonstrates that, even as these annual rituals helped define African Americans as a people by fostering a sense of shared history, heritage, and identity, they were also sites of ambiguity and conflict. Freedom celebrations served as occasions for debate over black representations in the public sphere, struggles for group leadership, and contests over collective memory and its meaning. Based on extensive research in African American newspapers and oration texts, this book retraces a vital if often overlooked tradition in African American political culture and addresses important issues about black participation in the public sphere. By illuminating the origins of black Americans' public commemorations, it also helps explain why there have been increasing calls in recent years to make the "Juneteenth" observance of emancipation an American -- not just an African American -- day of commemoration.

White Women Black Men

“Four Slaves Trials in Elbert County, Georgia.” Georgia Historical Quarterly 41 (1957): 237—46. Crow, Jeffrey J. The Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina. ... “ 'I's a Man Now': Gender and African American Men.

White Women  Black Men

This book is the first to explore the history of a powerful category of illicit sex in America’s past: liaisons between Southern white women and black men. Martha Hodes tells a series of stories about such liaisons in the years before the Civil War, explores the complex ways in which white Southerners tolerated them in the slave South, and shows how and why these responses changed with emancipation. Hodes provides details of the wedding of a white servant-woman and a slave man in 1681, an antebellum rape accusation that uncovered a relationship between an unmarried white woman and a slave, and a divorce plea from a white farmer based on an adulterous affair between his wife and a neighborhood slave. Drawing on sources that include courtroom testimony, legislative petitions, pardon pleas, and congressional testimony, she presents the voices of the authorities, eyewitnesses, and the transgressors themselves—and these voices seem to say that in the slave South, whites were not overwhelmingly concerned about such liaisons, beyond the racial and legal status of the children that were produced. Only with the advent of black freedom did the issue move beyond neighborhood dramas and into the arena of politics, becoming a much more serious taboo than it had ever been before. Hodes gives vivid examples of the violence that followed the upheaval of war, when black men and white women were targeted by the Ku Klux Klan and unprecedented white rage and terrorism against such liaisons began to erupt. An era of terror and lynchings was inaugurated, and the legacy of these sexual politics lingered well into the twentieth century.

The Way it was in the South

The Black Experience in Georgia Donald Lee Grant Jonathan Grant ... E. Merton Coulter , " Four Slave Trials in Elbert County , Georgia , " Georgia Historical Quarterly 41 ( 1957 ) 237-46 ; Robert G. McPherson , " Georgia Slave Trials ...

The Way it was in the South

Chronicles the black experience in Georgia from the early 1500s to the present, exploring the contradictions of life in a state that was home to both the KKK and the civil rights movement.

Shaping Traditions

Fish trap , white - oak splits TOBE WELLS Elberton , Elbert County , Ga . , 1984 Basketry traps have both European and Native American precedents ; this one was made by an African American bas- ket maker .

Shaping Traditions

A complete catalog of the Atlanta History Center’s permanent folk art exhibition, this richly illustrated volume defines and documents the folk arts of the lower southeastern United States. The objects, crafting processes, and performances represented here illustrate the unique qualities of the community-learned traditional arts of the South. John A. Burrison examines a multitude of traditional art forms, many of which still thrive today. Intricately constructed miniatures of covered wagons, sorghum-syrup mills, and pottery workshops speak of a life of subsistence farming. Decorated baskets represent the cultural exchanges of Native Americans, European Americans, and African Americans. Intricate wrought-iron gates, musical instruments, quilts, and such curiosities as face jugs combine beauty and utility--the dual nature of most folk art--with southern flair. An illuminating introduction by Burrison, the curator of the exhibit and an expert folk art collector, presents highlights of his thirty years of research and collecting experience, offering a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the exhibition. A concluding section looks at the adaptations and innovations shaping the future of southern folk arts.

CRM

the innovative and refer to specific African - American history will be - Joanne Blacoe research methods , tools , sources ... history from elderly African Amerand building a database of propericans in Elbert County , GA , and ties and ...

CRM


Slavery the Law

I found no confessions in Elbert County , Georgia , between 1837 and 1849 ( the years for which full records are ... Black Culture and Black Consciousness : Afro - American Folk Thought from Slavery to Freedom ( New York : Oxford ...

Slavery   the Law

In this book, prominent historians of slavery and legal scholars analyze the intricate relationship between slavery, race, and the law from the earliest Black Codes in colonial America to the passage of the Fugitive Slave Law and the Dred Scott decision prior to the Civil War. Slavery & the Law's wide-ranging essays focus on comparative slave law, auctioneering practices, rules of evidence, and property rights, as well as issues of criminality, punishment, and constitutional law.

All that Remains

BARN PASTURE COW BARN CALF BARN 1930 PASTUR CHICKEN HOUSES 1955 CHICKEN HOUSE HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY FURVEY NO GA - 31 ELBERT COUNTY GEORGIA 14 MILES SE ON COUNTY ROAD 244 FROM HEARDMONT Location : Present Owner : Present ...

All that Remains


Census of Housing 1990 Detailed Housing Characteristics Georgia

Effingham County Elbert County Emanuel County Evans County Fannin County Fayette County Floyd County Forsyth County Franklin County Fulton County RACE OF HOUSEHOLDER Occupied housing units White Black American Indian, Eskimo, ...

Census of Housing  1990   Detailed Housing Characteristics Georgia


Dispossession

Discrimination against African American Farmers in the Age of Civil Rights Pete Daniel ... Don, 252–53, 254–55 Edwards, Lillian M., 234 Edwards, Mary, 25 Edwards, Robert C., 190, 191 Eisenhower, Dwight D., 16 Elbert County (Ga.) ...

Dispossession

Between 1940 and 1974, the number of African American farmers fell from 681,790 to just 45,594--a drop of 93 percent. In his hard-hitting book, historian Pete Daniel analyzes this decline and chronicles black farmers' fierce struggles to remain on the land in the face of discrimination by bureaucrats in the U.S. Department of Agriculture. He exposes the shameful fact that at the very moment civil rights laws promised to end discrimination, hundreds of thousands of black farmers lost their hold on the land as they were denied loans, information, and access to the programs essential to survival in a capital-intensive farm structure. More than a matter of neglect of these farmers and their rights, this "passive nullification" consisted of a blizzard of bureaucratic obfuscation, blatant acts of discrimination and cronyism, violence, and intimidation. Dispossession recovers a lost chapter of the black experience in the American South, presenting a counternarrative to the conventional story of the progress achieved by the civil rights movement.

Southern Crossroads

G. D. Rawick, From Sundown to Sunup: The Making of the Black Community (Westport, Conn. ... a Large Piedmont Plantation in Abbeville County, South Carolina, and Elbert County, Georgia (Atlanta: national Park Service, 1987), 453; ...

Southern Crossroads

The South has always been one of the most distinctive regions of the United States, with its own set of traditions and a turbulent history. Although often associated with cotton, hearty food, and rich dialects, the South is also noted for its strong sense of religion, which has significantly shaped its history. Dramatic political, social, and economic events have often shaped the development of southern religion, making the nuanced dissection of the religious history of the region a difficult undertaking. For instance, segregation and the subsequent civil rights movement profoundly affected churches in the South as they sought to mesh the tenets of their faith with the prevailing culture. Editors Walter H. Conser and Rodger M. Payne and the book’s contributors place their work firmly in the trend of modern studies of southern religion that analyze cultural changes to gain a better understanding of religion’s place in southern culture now and in the future. Southern Crossroads: Perspectives on Religion and Culture takes a broad, interdisciplinary approach that explores the intersection of religion and various aspects of southern life. The volume is organized into three sections, such as “Religious Aspects of Southern Culture,” that deal with a variety of topics, including food, art, literature, violence, ritual, shrines, music, and interactions among religious groups. The authors survey many combinations of religion and culture, with discussions ranging from the effect of Elvis Presley’s music on southern spirituality to yard shrines in Miami to the archaeological record of African American slave religion. The book explores the experiences of immigrant religious groups in the South, also dealing with the reactions of native southerners to the groups arriving in the region. The authors discuss the emergence of religious and cultural acceptance, as well as some of the apparent resistance to this development, as they explore the experiences of Buddhist Americans in the South and Jewish foodways. Southern Crossroads also looks at distinct markers of religious identity and the role they play in gender, politics, ritual, and violence. The authors address issues such as the role of women in Southern Baptist churches and the religious overtones of lynching, with its themes of blood sacrifice and atonement. Southern Crossroads offers valuable insights into how southern religion is studied and how people and congregations evolve and adapt in an age of constant cultural change.

Cumulative List of Organizations Described in Section 170 c of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954

Black Men of America - Cobb Inc. , Until December 1999 , Marietta , Ga . Black Men Reaching Back , Gardena ... Black Rock - Riverside Neighborhood Housing Services Inc. , Buffalo , N. Y. The Black Rose Acoustic Society , Elbert , Co.

Cumulative List of Organizations Described in Section 170  c  of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954


In Those Days

Ferguson , Leland 1992 Uncommon Ground - Archaeology and Early African America , 1650-1800 . ... Research at Millwood Plantation , A Large Piedmont Plantation in Abbeville County , South Carolina and Elbert County , Georgia .

In Those Days