Empire and Culture

During the nineteenth century France acquired a huge empire, second in size only to Britain. ... however, have historians begun to turn their attention to the complex relationship between imperialism and culture.

Empire and Culture

By 1931, the time of the huge Colonial Exhibition in Paris, France had the second largest empire in the world extending to the four corners of the globe. Yet, intriguingly the multi-various impact of the empire upon French culture and society has been largely ignored by historians. This volume aims to redress this balance and will explore how the idea of empire was expressed in film, photography, painting and monuments. It analyzes how the image of the universal, civilising mission saturated French society during the first half of the Twentieth century. In particular it examines how the subject peoples of the empire were represented in art and fiction. In this way the volume underlines that there was not just one single image of empire but many ranging from the extreme right to the extreme left. It contains an in-depth consideration not just of the triumphalist images of empire but the oppositional ones, most notably the surrealists, which directly challenged the emergent colonial consensus.

Empire and Popular Culture

John MacKenzie in the same volume (IV) argued for an 'Indian Summer in the popular culture of Empire' between the two World Wars of the twentieth century, whi he thought le the reader rather baffled.65 Bernard Porter felt the ...

Empire and Popular Culture

From 1830, the British Empire began to permeate the domestic culture of Empire nations in many ways. This, the fourth volume of Empire and Popular Culture, explores the representation of the Empire in popular media such as newspapers, contemporary magazines and journals and in literature such as novels, works of non-fiction, in poems and ballads.

Queer Theory Law Culture Empire

The collection's invocation of empire inscribes itself against the recent flourishing of related scholarship, ... The analytic of imperial formation connects directly to culture, along the lines of this collection's inquiry: 'imperial ...

Queer Theory  Law  Culture  Empire

Queer Theory: Law, Culture, Empire uses queer theory to examine the complex interactions of law, culture, and empire. Building on recent work on empire, and taking contextual, socio-legal, comparative, and interdisciplinary approaches, it studies how activists and scholars engaged in queer theory projects can unwittingly advance imperial projects and how queer theory can itself show imperial ambitions. The authors – from five continents – delve into examples drawn from Bollywood cinema to California’s 2008 marriage referendum. The chapters view a wide range of texts – from cultural productions to laws and judgments – as regulatory forces requiring scrutiny from outside Western, heterosexual privilege. This innovative collection goes beyond earlier queer legal work, engaging with recent developments, featuring case studies from India, South Africa, the US, Australasia, Eastern Europe, and embracing the frames offered by different disciplinary lenses. Queer Theory: Law, Culture, Empire will be of particular interest to students and researchers in the fields of socio-legal studies, comparative law, law and gender/sexuality, and law and culture.

Informal Empire and the Rise of One World Culture

The battle lines are drawn between a mid-Victorian informal empire based on British capital and trade and a lateVictorian informal empire based on investment, trade and powerful cultural influence that lasted well into the 1920s.61 ...

Informal Empire and the Rise of One World Culture

Informal empire is a key mechanism of control that explains much of the configuration of the modern world. This book traces the broad outline of westernization through elite formations around the world in the modern era. It explains why the world is western and how formal empire describes only the tip of the iceberg of British and American power.

British Culture and the End of Empire

1940s , with the arrival of that significantly named vessel from the West Indies , the Empire Windrush , the processes of migration had been dra- ... Little or nothing has been written about the cultural changes wrought by the end ...

British Culture and the End of Empire

The demise of the British Empire in the three decades following the Second World War is a theme that has been well traversed in studies of post-war British politics, economics and foreign relations. Yet there has been strikingly little attention to the question of how these dramatic changes in Britain's relationships with the wider world were reflected in British culture. This volume addresses this central issue, arguing that the social and cultural impact of decolonisation had as significant an effect on the imperial centre as on the colonial periphery. Far from being a matter of indifference or resigned acceptance as is often suggested, the fall of the British Empire came as a profound shock to the British national imagination, and resonated widely in British popular culture.

Literature and Culture in the Roman Empire 96 235

Cross-Cultural Interactions Alice König, Rebecca Langlands, James Uden ... In their world history of empire, Jane Burbank and Frederick Cooper have usefully formulated a fundamental distinction between nation-states and the 'empires' ...

Literature and Culture in the Roman Empire  96   235

This book explores new ways of analysing interactions between different linguistic, cultural, and religious communities across the Roman Empire from the reign of Nerva to the Severans (96–235 CE). Bringing together leading scholars in classics with experts in the history of Judaism, Christianity and the Near East, it looks beyond the Greco-Roman binary that has dominated many studies of the period, and moves beyond traditional approaches to intertextuality in its study of the circulation of knowledge across languages and cultures. Its sixteen chapters explore shared ideas about aspects of imperial experience - law, patronage, architecture, the army - as well as the movement of ideas about history, exempla, documents and marvels. As the second volume in the Literary Interactions series, it offers a new and expansive vision of cross-cultural interaction in the Roman world, shedding light on connections that have gone previously unnoticed among the subcultures of a vast and evolving Empire.

Culture Empire and the Question of Being Modern

[ that ] the small island [ of Charles II's reign ] , beginning to gather to itself the empires of India and ... in the human race.27 Eliot's attitude toward national culture is nearly but not quite opposite to that outlined above .

Culture  Empire  and the Question of Being Modern

Culture, Empire, and the Question of Being Modern explores the problematic formation of national culture within modern English society. In this ambitious work of post-colonial and cultural theory, C. J. Wan-ling Wee investigates the complex interaction between a modern, industrialized, metropolitan, and progressively rational English national culture and a nationalistic imperial discourse interested in territorial expansion and the valorization of an idealized agrarian past. Starting with the Victorian era, the work documents the complex relationship of concepts such as 'home' and 'frontier' and 'EnglishO and 'colonial' through an analysis of key literary-cultural figures in their historical contexts: Rudyard Kipling, Charles Kingsley, T.S. Eliot, and V.S. Naipaul. Wee brings the discussion of modernity into the present with a consideration of post-imperial Singapore--a neo-traditionalist modern society that reworks many of the colonial tropes and contradictions--to investigate the ambiguities and contradictions revealed in the West's engagement with modernity.

Colonialism and the Object

Drawing together intensive case studies from an international group of scholars, the editors explore the impact of colonial contact with other cultures on the material culture of both the colonized and the imperial nation.

Colonialism and the Object

Drawing together intensive case studies from an international group of scholars, the editors explore the impact of colonial contact with other cultures on the material culture of both the colonized and the imperial nation.

India Empire and First World War Culture

India, Empire, and First World War Culture is situated at the intersection of three principal areas: First World War studies, South Asian history, and colonial and postcolonial literature. In the last several decades, the field of First ...

India  Empire  and First World War Culture

Based on ten years of research, Santanu Das's India, Empire, and First World War Culture: Writings, Images, and Songs recovers the sensuous experience of combatants, non-combatants and civilians from undivided India in the 1914–1918 conflict and their socio-cultural, visual, and literary worlds. Around 1.5 million Indians were recruited, of whom over a million served abroad. Das draws on a variety of fresh, unusual sources - objects, images, rumours, streetpamphlets, letters, diaries, sound-recordings, folksongs, testimonies, poetry, essays, and fiction - to produce the first cultural and literary history, moving from recruitment tactics in villages through sepoy traces and feelings in battlefields, hospitals, and POW camps to post-war reflections on Europe and empire. Combining archival excavation in different countries across several continents with investigative readings of Gandhi, Kipling, Iqbal, Naidu, Nazrul, Tagore, and Anand, this imaginative study opens up the worlds of sepoys and labourers, men and women, nationalists, artists, and intellectuals, trying to make sense of home and the world in times of war.

The Anarchy of Empire in the Making of U S Culture

Disembodi- ment might describe the cultural fantasy underlying what historians have called the economically determined " informal empire , " the de- sire for total control disentangled from direct political annexation.11 In fact ...

The Anarchy of Empire in the Making of U S  Culture

Kaplan shows how U.S. imperialism—from “Manifest Destiny” to the “American Century”—has profoundly shaped key elements of American culture at home, and how the struggle for power over foreign peoples and places has disrupted the quest for domestic order.

British Women and Cultural Practices of Empire 1770 1940

... Indian Women and Imperial Culture, 1865–1915 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina, 1994). 23 Mary Procida, Married to the Empire: Gender, Politics and Imperialism in India, 1883–1947 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, ...

British Women and Cultural Practices of Empire  1770 1940

Correspondence, travel writing, diary writing, painting, scrapbooking, curating, collecting and house interiors allowed British women scope to express their responses to imperial sites and experiences in the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. Taking these productions as its archive, British Women and Cultural Practices of Empire, 1775-1930 includes a collection of essays from different disciplines that consider the role of British women's cultural practices and productions in conceptualising empire. While such productions have started to receive greater scholarly attention, this volume uses a more self-conscious lens of gender to question whether female cultural work demonstrates that colonial women engaged with the spaces and places of empire in distinctive ways. By working across disciplines, centuries and different colonial geographies, the volume makes an exciting and important contribution to the field by demonstrating the diverse ways in which European women shaped constructions of empire in the modern period.

A Cultural History of the British Empire

... in the genre both represented American ambivalence towards empire and nationalism while still subscribing fully to the 'cultural outlook that ... Were they, however, influential in the maintenance of imperial culture and identities?

A Cultural History of the British Empire

A compelling history of British imperial culture, showing how it was adopted and subverted by colonial subjects around the world As the British Empire expanded across the globe, it exported more than troops and goods. In every colony, imperial delegates dispersed British cultural forms. Facilitated by the rapid growth of print, photography, film, and radio, imperialists imagined this new global culture would cement the unity of the empire. But this remarkably wide-ranging spread of ideas had unintended and surprising results. In this groundbreaking history, John M. MacKenzie examines the importance of culture in British imperialism. MacKenzie describes how colonized peoples were quick to observe British culture--and adapted elements to their own ends, subverting British expectations and eventually beating them at their own game. As indigenous communities integrated their own cultures with the British imports, the empire itself was increasingly undermined. From the extraordinary spread of cricket and horse racing to statues and ceremonies, MacKenzie presents an engaging imperial history--one with profound implications for global culture in the present day.

A Cultural History of Theatre in the Age of Empire

Rather on the contrary, the end of the nineteenth century saw the emergence of massive touring entertainment enterprises: after the American Civil War (1861–1865), popular culture in the United States increasingly grew into an industry ...

A Cultural History of Theatre in the Age of Empire

The 19th century ushered in an unprecedented boom in technology, the unification of European nations, the building of global empires and stabilization of the middle classes. The theatre of the era reflected these significant developments as well as helped to catalyse them. Populist theatre and purposebuilt playhouses flourished in the ever-growing urban and cosmopolitan centres of Europe and in expanding global networks. This volume provides a comprehensive and interdisciplinary overview of the cultural history of theatre from 1800 to 1920. Highly illustrated with 51 images, the ten chapters each take a different theme as their focus: institutional frameworks; social functions; sexuality and gender; the environment of theatre; circulation; interpretations; communities of production; repertoire and genres; technologies of performance; and knowledge transmission.

Eco Cultural Networks and the British Empire

... Edward Melillo and Emily O'Gorman, 'Rethinking the British Empire through Eco-cultural Networks: Materialist-Cultural Environmental History, Relational Connections, and Agency'. Environment and History 20, 4 (2014): 561–75.

Eco Cultural Networks and the British Empire

19th-century British imperial expansion dramatically shaped today's globalised world. Imperialism encouraged mass migrations of people, shifting flora, fauna and commodities around the world and led to a series of radical environmental changes never before experienced in history. Eco-Cultural Networks and the British Empire explores how these networks shaped ecosystems, cultures and societies throughout the British Empire and how they were themselves transformed by local and regional conditions. This multi-authored volume begins with a rigorous theoretical analysis of the categories of 'empire' and 'imperialism'. Its chapters, written by leading scholars in the field, draw methodologically from recent studies in environmental history, post-colonial theory and the history of science. Together, these perspectives provide a comprehensive historical understanding of how the British Empire reshaped the globe during the 19th and 20th centuries. This book will be an important addition to the literature on British imperialism and global ecological change.

Cultural Identity in the Roman Empire

The contributors present the development of Roman cultural identity throughout the empire as a complex and two-way process, far removed from the previous dichotomy between the Roman invaders and the conquered Barbarians." --Book Jacket.

Cultural Identity in the Roman Empire

"This provocative and controversial volume examines the notions of ethnicity, citizenship and nationhood to determine what constituted cultural identity in the Roman empire. The contributors draw together the most recent research and use diverse theoretical and methodological perspectives from archaeology, classical studies and ancient history to challenge our basic assumptions of Romanization and how parts of Europe became incorporated into a Roman culture." "Cultural Identity in the Roman Empire breaks new ground, negating the idea of a unified and easily defined Roman culture as over-simplistic. The contributors present the development of Roman cultural identity throughout the empire as a complex and two-way process, far removed from the previous dichotomy between the Roman invaders and the conquered Barbarians." --Book Jacket.

A New Imperial History

Publisher Description

A New Imperial History

This pioneering collection of essays charts an exciting new field in British studies, 'the new imperial history'. Leading scholars from history, literature and cultural studies tackle problems of identity, modernity and difference in eighteenth-century Britain and the empire. They examine, from interdisciplinary perspectives, the reciprocal influences of empire and culture, the movements of peoples, practices and ideas effected by slavery, diaspora and British dominance, and ways in which subaltern, non-western and non-elite people shaped British power and knowledge. The essays move through Britain, America, India, Africa and the South Pacific in testament to the networks of people, commodities and entangled pasts forged by Britain's imperial adventures. Based on ground-breaking research, these analyses of the imperial dimensions of British culture and identities in global contexts will challenge the notion that empire was something that happened 'out there', and they demonstrate its long-lasting implications for British identity and everyday life.

British Culture and the End of Empire

Opening up an entirely new field of enquiry in the history of decolonization, the essays in this volume reflect on the fall of the British Empire, and its resonance in British popular culture.

British Culture and the End of Empire

Opening up an entirely new field of enquiry in the history of decolonization, the essays in this volume reflect on the fall of the British Empire, and its resonance in British popular culture. The demise of the Empire during the three decades following WWII transformed Britain's relationships with the wider world, and within Britain itself. The contributors argue that the social and cultural impact of decolinization had as significant of an effect on the imperial center as on the colonial periphery.

Cultural Identity in the Roman Empire

Colonialism and Culture, Comparative Studies in Society and History series, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1–25. Doyle, M. (1986), Empires, Ithaca: Cornell University Press. Friedman, J. (1992), 'The past in ...

Cultural Identity in the Roman Empire

This provocative and often controversial volume examines concepts of ethnicity, citizenship and nationhood, to determine what constituted cultural identity in the Roman Empire. The contributors draw together the most recent research and use diverse theoretical and methodological perspectives from archaeology, classical studies and ancient history to challenge our basic assumptions of Romanization and how parts of Europe became incorporated into a Roman culture. Cultural Identity in the Roman Empire breaks new ground, arguing that the idea of a unified and easily defined Roman culture is over-simplistic, and offering alternative theories and models. This well-documented and timely book presents cultural identity throughout the Roman empire as a complex and diverse issue, far removed from the previous notion of a dichotomy between the Roman invaders and the Barbarian conquered.

Cultural Work of Empire

Making and Unmaking of Empires: Britain, India and America 1750–1783 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005), on the unevenness of the appropriation of political power in India, distinguishing between the take-over in Bengal where there ...

Cultural Work of Empire

This book argues that the Seven Years' War (1756-63) produced an intense historical consciousness within British cultural life regarding the boundaries of belonging to community, family and nation. Global warfare prompts a radical re-imagining of the state and the subjectivities of those who inhabit it. Laurence Sterne's distinctive writing provides a remarkable route through the transformations of mid-eighteenth-century British culture. The risks of war generate unexpected freedoms and crises in the making of domestic imperial subjects, which will continue to reverberate in anti-slavery struggles and colonial conflict from America to India. The book concentrates on the period from the 1750s to the 1770s. It explores the work of Johnson, Goldsmith, Walpole, Burke, Scott, Wheatley, Sancho, Smollett, Rousseau, Collier, Smith and Wollstonecraft alongside Sterne's narratives. It incorporates debates among moral philosophers and philanthropists, examines political tracts, poetry and grammar exercises, and paintings by Kauffman, Hayman, and Wright of Derby, tracking the investments in, and resistances to, the cultural work of empire.Key Features* Topical in its focus on the making of 'modern' subjectivity during the first 'global war'* Path-breaking in advancing our understanding of the cultural history of eighteenth-century Britain* Timely in its combination of new historical research with a critical engagement with debates in postcolonial and subaltern studies* Original in its account of the literature of the Seven Years' War and its outstanding analysis of the writing of Laurence Sterne

A Cultural History of Peace in the Age of Empire

The last chapter of each volume of A Cultural History of Peace addresses a theme that many people mistakenly identify ... These chapters show that the social order imposed by expanding empires, kingdoms, and nation- states has long been ...

A Cultural History of Peace in the Age of Empire

A Cultural History of Peace presents an authoritative survey from ancient times to the present. The set of six volumes covers over 2500 years of history, charting the evolving nature and role of peace throughout history. This volume, A Cultural History of Peace in the Age of Empire, explores peace in the period from 1800 to 1920. As with all the volumes in the illustrated Cultural History of Peace set, this volume presents essays on the meaning of peace, peace movements, maintaining peace, peace in relation to gender, religion and war and representations of peace. A Cultural History of Peace in the Age of Empire is the most authoritative and comprehensive survey available on peace in the long 19th century.