Empire of Fortune

Examines the Seven Years War in the context of imperial aggressions, Indian tribes incited to raid, and British colonists' resistance

Empire of Fortune

Examines the Seven Years War in the context of imperial aggressions, Indian tribes incited to raid, and British colonists' resistance

City of Fortune

City of Fortune traces the full arc of the Venetian imperial saga, from the ill-fated Fourth Crusade, which culminates in the sacking of Constantinople in 1204, to the Ottoman-Venetian War of 1499–1503, which sees the Ottoman Turks ...

City of Fortune

“The rise and fall of Venice’s empire is an irresistible story and [Roger] Crowley, with his rousing descriptive gifts and scholarly attention to detail, is its perfect chronicler.”—The Financial Times The New York Times bestselling author of Empires of the Sea charts Venice’s astounding five-hundred-year voyage to the pinnacle of power in an epic story that stands unrivaled for drama, intrigue, and sheer opulent majesty. City of Fortune traces the full arc of the Venetian imperial saga, from the ill-fated Fourth Crusade, which culminates in the sacking of Constantinople in 1204, to the Ottoman-Venetian War of 1499–1503, which sees the Ottoman Turks supplant the Venetians as the preeminent naval power in the Mediterranean. In between are three centuries of Venetian maritime dominance, during which a tiny city of “lagoon dwellers” grow into the richest place on earth. Drawing on firsthand accounts of pitched sea battles, skillful negotiations, and diplomatic maneuvers, Crowley paints a vivid picture of this avaricious, enterprising people and the bountiful lands that came under their dominion. From the opening of the spice routes to the clash between Christianity and Islam, Venice played a leading role in the defining conflicts of its time—the reverberations of which are still being felt today. “[Crowley] writes with a racy briskness that lifts sea battles and sieges off the page.”—The New York Times “Crowley chronicles the peak of Venice’s past glory with Wordsworthian sympathy, supplemented by impressive learning and infectious enthusiasm.”—The Wall Street Journal

The Oil and the Glory

At the heart of the story is the contest to build and operate energy pipelines out of the landlocked region, the key to controlling the Caspian and its oil.

The Oil and the Glory

Remote, forbidding, and volatile, the Caspian Sea long tantalized the world with its vast oil reserves. But outsiders, blocked by the closed Soviet system, couldn’t get to it. Then the Soviet Union collapsed, and a wholesale rush into the region erupted. Along with oilmen, representatives of the world’s leading nations flocked to the Caspian for a share of the thirty billion barrels of proven oil reserves at stake, and a tense geopolitical struggle began. The main players were Moscow and Washington–the former seeking to retain control of its satellite states, and the latter intent on dislodging Russia to the benefit of the West. The Oil and the Glory is the gripping account of this latest phase in the epochal struggle for control of the earth’s “black gold.” Steve LeVine, who was based in the region for The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and Newsweek, weaves an astonishing tale of high-stakes political gamesmanship, greed, and scandal, set in one of the most opaque corners of the world. In LeVine’s telling, the world’s energy giants jockey for position in the rich Kazakh and Azeri oilfields, while superpowers seek to gain a strategic foothold in the region and to keep each other in check. At the heart of the story is the contest to build and operate energy pipelines out of the landlocked region, the key to controlling the Caspian and its oil. The oil pipeline that resulted, the longest in the world, is among Washington’s greatest foreign policy triumphs in at least a decade and a half. Along the way, LeVine introduces such players as James Giffen, an American moneyman who was also the political “fixer” for oil companies eager to do business on the Caspian and the broker for Kazakhstan’s president and ministers; John Deuss, the flamboyant Dutch oil trader who won big but lost even bigger; Heydar Aliyev, the oft-misunderstood Azeri president who transcended his past as a Soviet Politburo member and masterminded a scheme to loosen Russian control over its former colonies in the Caspian region; and all manner of rogues, adventurers, and others drawn by the irresistible pull of untold riches and the possible “final frontier” of the fossil-fuel era. The broader story is of the geopolitical questions of the Caspian oil bonanza, such as whether Russia can be a trusted ally and trading partner with the West, and what Washington’s entry into this important but chaotic region will mean for its long-term stability. In an intense and suspenseful narrative, The Oil and the Glory is the definitive chronicle of events that are understood by few, but whose political and economic impact will be both profound and lasting.

Fur Fortune and Empire The Epic History of the Fur Trade in America

This work provides an international cast beyond the scope of any Hollywood epic, including Thomas Morton, the rabble-rouser who infuriated the Pilgrims by trading guns with the Indians; British explorer Captain James Cook, whose discovery ...

Fur  Fortune  and Empire  The Epic History of the Fur Trade in America

A Seattle Times selection for one of Best Non-Fiction Books of 2010 Winner of the New England Historial Association's 2010 James P. Hanlan Award Winner of the Outdoor Writers Association of America 2011 Excellence in Craft Award, Book Division, First Place "A compelling and well-annotated tale of greed, slaughter and geopolitics." —Los Angeles Times As Henry Hudson sailed up the broad river that would one day bear his name, he grew concerned that his Dutch patrons would be disappointed in his failure to find the fabled route to the Orient. What became immediately apparent, however, from the Indians clad in deer skins and "good furs" was that Hudson had discovered something just as tantalizing. The news of Hudson's 1609 voyage to America ignited a fierce competition to lay claim to this uncharted continent, teeming with untapped natural resources. The result was the creation of an American fur trade, which fostered economic rivalries and fueled wars among the European powers, and later between the United States and Great Britain, as North America became a battleground for colonization and imperial aspirations. In Fur, Fortune, and Empire, best-selling author Eric Jay Dolin chronicles the rise and fall of the fur trade of old, when the rallying cry was "get the furs while they last." Beavers, sea otters, and buffalos were slaughtered, used for their precious pelts that were tailored into extravagant hats, coats, and sleigh blankets. To read Fur, Fortune, and Empire then is to understand how North America was explored, exploited, and settled, while its native Indians were alternately enriched and exploited by the trade. As Dolin demonstrates, fur, both an economic elixir and an agent of destruction, became inextricably linked to many key events in American history, including the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, and the War of 1812, as well as to the relentless pull of Manifest Destiny and the opening of the West. This work provides an international cast beyond the scope of any Hollywood epic, including Thomas Morton, the rabble-rouser who infuriated the Pilgrims by trading guns with the Indians; British explorer Captain James Cook, whose discovery in the Pacific Northwest helped launch America's China trade; Thomas Jefferson who dreamed of expanding the fur trade beyond the Mississippi; America's first multimillionaire John Jacob Astor, who built a fortune on a foundation of fur; and intrepid mountain men such as Kit Carson and Jedediah Smith, who sliced their way through an awe inspiring and unforgiving landscape, leaving behind a mythic legacy still resonates today. Concluding with the virtual extinction of the buffalo in the late 1800s, Fur, Fortune, and Empire is an epic history that brings to vivid life three hundred years of the American experience, conclusively demonstrating that the fur trade played a seminal role in creating the nation we are today.

Hostages to Fortune

Explains the role the United Empire Loyalists had in the founding of Canada.

Hostages to Fortune

Explains the role the United Empire Loyalists had in the founding of Canada.

Gender and Empire

Authoritative and approachable, this is essential reading for students of world history, imperial history and gender relations.

Gender and Empire

One of the first single-authored books to survey the role of sex and gender in the 'new imperial history', Gender and Empire covers the whole British Empire, demonstrating connections and comparisons between the white-settler colonies, and the colonies of exploitation and rule. Through key topics and episodes across a broad range of British Empire history, Angela Woollacott examines how gender ideologies and practices affected women and men, and structured imperial politics and culture. Woollacott integrates twenty years of scholarship, providing fresh insights and interpretation using feminist and postcolonial approaches. Fiction and other vivid primary sources present the voices of historical subjects, enlivening discussions of central topics and debates in imperial and colonial history. The circulation of imperial culture and colonial subjects along with conceptions of gender and race reveals the integrated nature of British colonialism from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. Authoritative and approachable, this is essential reading for students of world history, imperial history and gender relations.

Fortune s Soldier

Power, ambition, corruption – the British East India Company risesAn old empire at war with itself 1744, Scotland.

Fortune s Soldier

Power, ambition, corruption – the British East India Company risesAn old empire at war with itself 1744, Scotland. Young Nicholas Ballantyne’s life is turned upside down when his uncle, caught up in events far beyond his control, announces that, for his own safety, Nicholas is to set sail for India immediately to join the East India Company. A new power rising After decades of struggle, the Company is ready to expand. Nicholas and his new friend and colleague, the mercurial Robert Clive, rise quickly within the Company’s ranks, masterminding plans to counter French designs in India. A battle for survival But the fight for India will only be resolved in battle. On the fields of Plassey, the two armies draw up for the climactic encounter. For Robert and Nicholas, commanding the Company’s forces, this will be their making, or their end... Brilliantly crafted, and bringing to life the momentous events that shook India in the mid-eighteenth century, Fortune’s Soldier is an epic tale of a fascinating era by a master storyteller.

The Reichmanns

Traces the grand rise and spectacular fall of the devoutly religious and secretive Jewish dynasty that built the world's greatest international real-estate empire, from their roots in eighteenth-century Hungary to the present day. 35,000 ...

The Reichmanns

Traces the grand rise and spectacular fall of the devoutly religious and secretive Jewish dynasty that built the world's greatest international real-estate empire, from their roots in eighteenth-century Hungary to the present day. 35,000 first printing.

City of Fortune

From the prize-winning author of Empires of the Sea comes an epic work of narrative maritime history.

City of Fortune

From the prize-winning author of Empires of the Sea comes an epic work of narrative maritime history.

Ohio s First Peoples

Jennings, Empire of Fortune, 447 n. 26. Ironically, some of the Moravian Delawares taken into protective custody and housed in Philadelphia public buildings during the war also contracted smallpox, from which fifty-six of them died.

Ohio s First Peoples

Annotation In an accessible narrative style, O'Donnell depicts the Native Americans of the Buckeye State from the time of the Hopewell peoples to the forced removal of the Wyandots in the 1840s.

Beautiful Thoughts from French and Italien Authors

Il ne sait que par oui - dire Ce que c'est que la cour , la mer , et ton empire , Fortune , qui nous fais passer devant les yeux Des dignités , des biens , que jusqu'au bout du monde On suit , sans que l'effet aux promesses réponde !

Beautiful Thoughts from French and Italien Authors


Malaria and Victorian Fictions of Empire

75 O'Gorman claims that Haggard's obsession with “documentary survival” shows that he connects the uncertain fortune of empire with his own literary fortune. Concerns about the fate of empires and the fate of individual representatives ...

Malaria and Victorian Fictions of Empire

The impact of malaria on humankind has been profound. Focusing on depictions of this iconic 'disease of empire' in nineteenth-century and postcolonial fiction, Jessica Howell shows that authors such as Charles Dickens, Henry James, H. Rider Haggard, Olive Schreiner and Rudyard Kipling did not simply adopt the discourses of malarial containment and cure offered by colonial medicine. Instead, these authors adapted and rewrote some common associations with malarial images such as swamps, ruins, mosquitoes, blood, and fever. They also made use of the unique potential of fiction by incorporating chronic, cyclical illness, bodily transformation and adaptation within the very structures of their novels. Howell's study also examines the postcolonial literature of Amitav Ghosh and Derek Walcott, arguing that these authors use the multivalent and subversive potential of malaria in order to rewrite the legacies of colonial medicine.

A Zola Dictionary the Characters of the Rougon Macquart Novels of Emile Zola

... which gives the reader a fair general idea of what occurred in political spheres at an important period of the Empire. ... Empire (La Fortune des Rougon), was successful in amassing a vast fortune by speculation in building-sites.

A Zola Dictionary  the Characters of the Rougon Macquart Novels of Emile Zola

"A Zola Dictionary; the Characters of the Rougon-Macquart Novels of Emile Zola" by J. G Patterson. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

The American Revolution

nessy filled a long unmet need with An Empire Divided. ... Beginnings to the Lancaster Treaty of 1744 (New York: W.W. Norton, 1983), Empire of Fortune: Crowns, Colonies and Tribes in the Seven Years War in America (New York: W.W. Norton ...

The American Revolution

A newly revised version of a classic in American history When The American Revolution was first published in 1985, it was praised as the first synthesis of the Revolutionary War to use the new social history. Edward Countryman offered a balanced view of how the Revolution was made by a variety of groups-ordinary farmers as well as lawyers, women as well as men, blacks as well as whites-who transformed the character of American life and culture. In this newly revised edition, Countryman stresses the painful destruction of British identity and the construction of a new American one. He expands his geographical scope of the Revolution to include areas west of the Alleghenies, Europe, and Africa, and he draws fresh links between the politics and culture of the independence period and the creation of a new and dynamic capitalist economy. This innovative interpretation of the American Revolution creates an even richer, more comprehensive portrait of a critical period in America's history.

Nabobs

This book considers the controversy caused by 'nabobs', and the debate regarding British identity and British imperialism in the late eighteenth century.

Nabobs

This book considers the controversy caused by 'nabobs', and the debate regarding British identity and British imperialism in the late eighteenth century.