En Attendant Godot

En Attendant Godot

As Vladimir and Estragon await the arrival of Godot, they discuss their lives and consider hanging themselves, but choose to wait for Godot instead, in the hope that he can tell them what their purpose is, in a new bilingual edition of the classic play honoring the centennial of the Nobel laureate's birth. $50,000 ad/promo.

Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot

A Reference Guide

Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot

Texts -- Meaning -- Intellectual contexts -- Dramatic art -- Performance.

Waiting for Godot - Samuel Beckett, New Edition

Waiting for Godot - Samuel Beckett, New Edition

Presents a series of critical essays discussing the structure, themes, and subject matter of Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot.

Waiting for Godot

A Tragicomedy in Two Acts

Waiting for Godot

Subtitled 'A tragicomedy in two Acts', and famously described by the Irish critic Vivien Mercier as a play in which 'nothing happens, twice', En attendant Godot was first performed at the Théâtre de Babylone in Paris in 1953. It was translated into English by Samuel Beckett, and Waiting for Godot opened at the Arts Theatre in London in 1955. 'Go and see Waiting for Godot. At the worst you will discover a curiosity, a four-leaved clover, a black tulip; at the best something that will securely lodge in a corner of your mind for as long as you live.' Harold Hobson, 7 August 1955 'I told him that if by Godot I had meant God I would have said God, and not Godot. This seemed to disappoint him greatly.' Samuel Beckett, 1955

Translation, the Canon and its Discontents

Version and Subversion

Translation, the Canon and its Discontents

This collection addresses the complex process by which translation and other forms of rewriting have contributed to canon formation, revision, destabilization, and dismantlement. Through the play between version and subversion, which is inherent to any form of rewriting, these essays – focusing on translations since the sixteenth century down to the present day – stress the role of translation and adaptation as potentially transformative mediations, capable of shaping and undermining identities. Such manipulation is deeply ambivalent, since it can be used as a means of disseminating the ideology of oppressive regimes at the expense of the source text; but it can also serve to garner attention to marginalised texts. This tense interplay between political, social, and aesthetic purposes almost inevitably generates discontents, which may turn out to be the outcome of translation in general. However, discontent is a relational concept, depending on where one stands in the field of competing positions that is the canon.

Absurdity in Samuel Becketts "Waiting for Godot"

Absurdity in Samuel Becketts

Seminar paper from the year 2013 in the subject English - Literature, Works, grade: 1,0, Humboldt-University of Berlin (Anglistik und Amerikanistik), course: Innovative Twentieth-Century Theatre, language: English, abstract: In what way does Samuel Beckett create absurdity in his play "Waiting for Godot" and what is it that makes the “game” with the absurdity so unique and therefore Samuel Beckett’s play to one of the most authentic representatives of the "Theatre of the Absurd"? Samuel Beckett was born in 1906 in Dublin and died in 1989 in Paris. He was an Anglo-Irish author and wrote in French as well as in English. Furthermore, he wrote poems and novels and worked as a theatre director. Samuel Beckett is considered the master of absurdity. (cf. Schwanitz 323) The central theme in his works is the meaninglessness of the human existence. (cf. Wunderlich) He was friends with James Joyce and was impressed by Joyce’s “stream of consciousness” – a special literary method that James Joyce used. The idea of the “stream of consciousness” is an on-going process of associating things, i.e. the idea of getting inside into the uncontrolled process of thinking of a person. Waiting for Godot (1954) is Beckett’s translation of his own original French version that is called "En attendant Godot" (1952). In 1969 he received the Nobel Price for Literature, but he did not accept the price because people thought "Waiting for Godot" would be a potential religious play. According to Beckett that was wrong and that is why he decided to refuse the price. Finally, Samuel Beckett was the most unique, singular writer in English/French since 1945.

Dantean Dialogues

Engaging with the Legacy of Amilcare Iannucci

Dantean Dialogues

Dantean Dialogues is a collection of essays by some of the world's most outstanding Dante scholars., These essays enter into conversation with the main themes of the scholarship of Amilcare Iannucci (d. 2007), one of the leading researchers on Dante of his generation and arguably Canada’s finest scholar of the Italian poet. The essays focus on the major themes of Iannucci’s work, including the development of Dante’s early poetry, Dante’s relation to classical and biblical sources, and Dante’s reception. The contributors cover crucial aspects of Dante’s work, from the authority of the New Life to the novelty of his early poetry, to key episodes in the Comedy, to the poem’s afterlife. Together, the essays show how Iannucci’s reading of central cruxes in Dante’s texts continues to inspire Dante studies – a testament to his continuing influence and profound intellectual legacy.

Rhetoric

Readings in French Literature

Rhetoric

Setting out the principles of rhetoric with a wide range of illustrative examples in the first chapter, the author then explores rhetoric at work in different genres, via a close reading of texts