Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics

With over 950 entries and approximately 400 contributing scholars, the Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics is the authoritative reference work of all aspects of the history and study of the Hebrew language from its earliest ...

Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics

The Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics Online offers a systematic and comprehensive treatment of all aspects of the history and study of the Hebrew language from its earliest attested form to the present day.

The Semitic Languages

In Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics. Fol J, edited by Geoffrey Khan, 205–18. Leiden: Brill, 2013a. Boneh, Nora. “Mood and Modality: Modern Hebrew.” In Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics, Vol.

The Semitic Languages

The Semitic Languages presents a comprehensive survey of the individual languages and language clusters within this language family, from their origins in antiquity to their present-day forms. This second edition has been fully revised, with new chapters and a wealth of additional material. New features include the following: • new introductory chapters on Proto-Semitic grammar and Semitic linguistic typology • an additional chapter on the place of Semitic as a subgroup of Afro-Asiatic, and several chapters on modern forms of Arabic, Aramaic and Ethiopian Semitic • text samples of each individual language, transcribed into the International Phonetic Alphabet, with standard linguistic word-by-word glossing as well as translation • new maps and tables present information visually for easy reference. This unique resource is the ideal reference for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students of linguistics and language. It will be of interest to researchers and anyone with an interest in historical linguistics, linguistic typology, linguistic anthropology and language development.

Language Contact and the Development of Modern Hebrew

Brill Online. http:// referenceworks.brillonline.com/entries/encyclopedia-of-hebrew-language-andlinguistics/verbal-system-medieval-hebrew-poetry-EHLL_SIM_000531. Gzella, Holger. 2013. “Presentatives.” In Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language ...

Language Contact and the Development of Modern Hebrew

Language Contact and the Development of Modern Hebrew, edited by Edit Doron, presents twenty four different innovative syntactic constructions of Modern Hebrew, attributing them to syntactic change due to the impact of contact languages on previous stages of Hebrew.

Usage Based Studies in Modern Hebrew

In Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics, Vol. 2, Geoffrey Khan (ed.), 847–852. Leiden: Brill. Harshav, Benjamin. 1993. Language in Time of Revolution. Berkeley CA: University of California Press.

Usage Based Studies in Modern Hebrew

The goal of the volume is to shed fresh light on Modern Hebrew from perspectives aimed at readers interested in the domains of general linguistics, typology, and Semitic studies. Starting with chapters that provide background information on the evolution and sociolinguistic setting of the language, the bulk of the book is devoted to usage-based studies of the morphology, lexicon, and syntax of current Hebrew. Based primarily on original analyses of authentic spoken and online materials, these studies reflect varied theoretical frames-of-reference that are largely model-neutral in approach. To this end, the book presents a functionally motivated, dynamic approach to actual usage, rather than providing strictly structuralist or formal characterizations of particular linguistic systems. Such a perspective is particularly important in the case of a language undergoing accelerated processes of change, in which the gap between prescriptive dictates of the Hebrew Language Establishment and the actual usage of educated, literate but non-expert speaker-writers of current Hebrew is constantly on the rise.

Languages in Jewish Communities Past and Present

Encyclopedia of Hebrew language and linguistics, vol. 2, 390–391. Leiden: Brill. Rustow, Marina. 2008. Heresy and the politics of community: The Jews of the Fatimid caliphate. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. Shachmon, Ori. 2013.

Languages in Jewish Communities  Past and Present

This book offers sociological and structural descriptions of language varieties used in over 2 dozen Jewish communities around the world, along with synthesizing and theoretical chapters. Language descriptions focus on historical development, contemporary use, regional and social variation, structural features, and Hebrew/Aramaic loanwords. The book covers commonly researched language varieties, like Yiddish, Judeo-Spanish, and Judeo-Arabic, as well as less commonly researched ones, like Judeo-Tat, Jewish Swedish, and Hebraized Amharic in Israel today.

Historical Continuity in the Emergence of Modern Hebrew

In Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics, edited by Geoffrey Khan. Consulted online. http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/2212-4241 _ehll _EHLL _COM_ 00000201. Cooper, Robert L. 1985. “Language and Social Stratification among the Jewish ...

Historical Continuity in the Emergence of Modern Hebrew

Historical Continuity in the Emergence of Modern Hebrew offers a new perspective on the emergence processes of Modern Hebrew and its relationship to earlier forms of Hebrew. Based on a textual examination of select case studies of language use throughout the modernization of Hebrew, this book shows that due to the unconventional sociolinguistic circumstances in the budding speech community, linguistic processes did not necessarily evolve in a linear manner, blurring the distinction between true and apparent historical continuity. The emergent language’s standardization involved the restructuring of linguistic habits that had initially taken root among the first speakers, often leading to a retreat from early contact-induced or non-classical phenomena. Yael Reshef demonstrates that as a result, superficial similarity to earlier forms of Hebrew did not necessarily stem from continuity, and deviation from canonical Hebrew features does not necessarily stem from change.

A Biblical Hebrew Reference Grammar

1 of Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics. Edited by G. Khan. Leiden: Brill. ———. 2013b. “Pronominalization.” Pages 272–77 in Vol. 3 of Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics. Edited by G. Khan. Leiden: Brill. ———.

A Biblical Hebrew Reference Grammar

This new and fully revised edition of the A Biblical Hebrew Reference Grammar serves as a user-friendly and up-to-date source of information on the morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics of Biblical Hebrew verbs, nouns and other word classes (prepositions, conjunctions, adverbs, modal words, negatives, focus particles, discourse markers, interrogatives and interjections). It also contains one of the most elaborate treatments of Biblical Hebrew word order yet published in a grammar. Compiled by authors with extensive experience in the teaching of Hebrew, the text is rendered both easily accessible and a fascinating examination of the language, building upon the initial publication by incorporating up-to-date developments in the study of the Hebrew Bible. This grammar will be of service both to students who have completed an introductory or intermediate course in Biblical Hebrew, and also to more advanced scholars seeking to take advantage of traditional and recent descriptions of the language that go beyond the basic morphology of Biblical Hebrew.

The Tiberian Pronunciation Tradition of Biblical Hebrew Volume 1

In Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics, edited by Geoffrey Khan, Shmuel Bolozky, Steven E. Fassberg, Gary A. Rendsburg, Aaron D. Rubin, Ora R. Schwarzwald, and Tamar Zewi, 3:384–89. Leiden–Boston: Brill. ———. 2013d.

The Tiberian Pronunciation Tradition of Biblical Hebrew  Volume 1

These volumes represent the highest level of scholarship on what is arguably the most important tradition of Biblical Hebrew. Written by the leading scholar of the Tiberian Masoretic tradition, they offer a wealth of new data and revised analysis, and constitute a considerable advance on existing published scholarship. It should stand alongside Israel Yeivin’s ‘The Tiberian Masorah’ as an essential handbook for scholars of Biblical Hebrew, and will remain an indispensable reference work for decades to come. —Dr. Benjamin Outhwaite, Director of the Taylor-Schechter Genizah Research Unit, Cambridge University Library The form of Biblical Hebrew that is presented in printed editions, with vocalization and accent signs, has its origin in medieval manuscripts of the Bible. The vocalization and accent signs are notation systems that were created in Tiberias in the early Islamic period by scholars known as the Tiberian Masoretes, but the oral tradition they represent has roots in antiquity. The grammatical textbooks and reference grammars of Biblical Hebrew in use today are heirs to centuries of tradition of grammatical works on Biblical Hebrew in Europe. The paradox is that this European tradition of Biblical Hebrew grammar did not have direct access to the way the Tiberian Masoretes were pronouncing Biblical Hebrew. In the last few decades, research of manuscript sources from the medieval Middle East has made it possible to reconstruct with considerable accuracy the pronunciation of the Tiberian Masoretes, which has come to be known as the ‘Tiberian pronunciation tradition’. This book presents the current state of knowledge of the Tiberian pronunciation tradition of Biblical Hebrew and a full edition of one of the key medieval sources, Hidāyat al-Qāriʾ ‘The Guide for the Reader’, by ʾAbū al-Faraj Hārūn. It is hoped that the book will help to break the mould of current grammatical descriptions of Biblical Hebrew and form a bridge between modern traditions of grammar and the school of the Masoretes of Tiberias. Links and QR codes in the book allow readers to listen to an oral performance of samples of the reconstructed Tiberian pronunciation by Alex Foreman. This is the first time Biblical Hebrew has been recited with the Tiberian pronunciation for a millennium.

A Grammar of the Eastern European Hasidic Hebrew Tale

In Encyclopedia of Hebrew language and linguistics, ed. Geoffrey Khan et. al. Brill Online. Frieden, Ken. 2005. Joseph Perl's escape from biblical epigonism through parody of ḥasidic writing. ajsReview 29 (2): 265–282. Garr, W. Randall.

A Grammar of the Eastern European Hasidic Hebrew Tale

This volume constitutes the first reference grammar of the Hasidic Hebrew hagiographic tales composed in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Eastern Europe. It presents a thorough survey of Hasidic Hebrew orthography, morphology, syntax, and lexis illustrated with extensive examples.

Language Contact Continuity and Change in the Genesis of Modern Hebrew

Palmer, Frank Robert. 2001. Mood and Modality, 2nd edn. Cambridge: CUP. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139167178 Pat-El, Na'ama. 2013. Possession: Pre-modern Hebrew. In Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics, Geoffrey Khan (ed.) ...

Language Contact  Continuity and Change in the Genesis of Modern Hebrew

The emergence of Modern Hebrew as a spoken language constitutes a unique event in modern history: a language which for generations only existed in the written mode underwent a process popularly called “revival”, acquiring native speakers and becoming a language spoken for everyday use. Despite the attention it has drawn, this particular case of language-shift, which differs from the better-documented cases of creoles and mixed languages, has not been discussed within the framework of the literature on contact-induced change. The linguistic properties of the process have not been systematically studied, and the status of the emergent language as a (dis)continuous stage of its historical sources has not been evaluated in the context of other known cases of language shift. The present collection presents detailed case studies of the syntactic evolution of Modern Hebrew, alongside general theoretical discussion, with the aim of bringing the case of Hebrew to the attention of language-contact scholars, while bringing the insights of the literature on language contact to help shed light on the case of Hebrew.

The Syntax of Volitives in Biblical Hebrew and Amarna Canaanite Prose

“Direct and Indirect Speech: Biblical Hebrew.” Pp. 740–42 in vol. 1 of Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics, ed. Geoffrey Khan. Leiden: Brill, 2013. ______. “Introducing Direct Discourse in Biblical Hebrew Narrative.

The Syntax of Volitives in Biblical Hebrew and Amarna Canaanite Prose

During the past century, numerous books and articles have appeared on the verbal system of Semitic languages. Thanks to the discovery of Ugaritic texts, Akkadian tablets, Canaanite letters found at Tell el-Amarna in Egypt, Hebrew and Aramaic inscriptions, and the Dead Sea Scrolls, our understanding of the phonology, morphology, and syntax of the Semitic languages has increased substantially. Dallaire focuses primarily on prose texts in Biblical Hebrew and Amarna Canaanite in which the verbal system (morphemes, syntax) expresses nuances of wishes, desires, requests, and commands. According to her, volitional concepts are found in every language and are expressed through verbal morphemes, syntagmas, intonation, syntax, and other linguistic means. The Syntax of Volitives in Biblical Hebrew and Amarna Canaanite Prose attempts to answer the following questions: Do volitives function in a similar way in Biblical Hebrew and Amarna Canaanite? Where and why is there overlap in morphology and syntax between these two languages? What morphological and syntactical differences exist between the volitional expressions of the languages? In attempting to answer these questions, the author bears in mind the fact that, within each of these two languages, scribes from different areas used specific dialectal and scribal traditions (for example, northern versus southern, peripheral versus central).

Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics

Tene D. Linguistic literature, Hebrew. [(sections 1–4)] Encyclopaedia Judaica, vol. 16. Keter Publishing House: Jerusalem, 1971:1352–1390. Angel Sáenz-Badillos obtained a Ph.D. in 1972 from Universidad Complutense, Madrid.

Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics

The first edition of ELL (1993, Ron Asher, Editor) was hailed as "the field's standard reference work for a generation". Now the all-new second edition matches ELL's comprehensiveness and high quality, expanded for a new generation, while being the first encyclopedia to really exploit the multimedia potential of linguistics. * The most authoritative, up-to-date, comprehensive, and international reference source in its field * An entirely new work, with new editors, new authors, new topics and newly commissioned articles with a handful of classic articles * The first Encyclopedia to exploit the multimedia potential of linguistics through the online edition * Ground-breaking and International in scope and approach * Alphabetically arranged with extensive cross-referencing * Available in print and online, priced separately. The online version will include updates as subjects develop ELL2 includes: * c. 7,500,000 words * c. 11,000 pages * c. 3,000 articles * c. 1,500 figures: 130 halftones and 150 colour * Supplementary audio, video and text files online * c. 3,500 glossary definitions * c. 39,000 references * Extensive list of commonly used abbreviations * List of languages of the world (including information on no. of speakers, language family, etc.) * Approximately 700 biographical entries (now includes contemporary linguists) * 200 language maps in print and online Also available online via ScienceDirect – featuring extensive browsing, searching, and internal cross-referencing between articles in the work, plus dynamic linking to journal articles and abstract databases, making navigation flexible and easy. For more information, pricing options and availability visit www.info.sciencedirect.com. The first Encyclopedia to exploit the multimedia potential of linguistics Ground-breaking in scope - wider than any predecessor An invaluable resource for researchers, academics, students and professionals in the fields of: linguistics, anthropology, education, psychology, language acquisition, language pathology, cognitive science, sociology, the law, the media, medicine & computer science. The most authoritative, up-to-date, comprehensive, and international reference source in its field

Studies in Semitic Vocalisation and Reading Traditions

'Guttural Consonants: Masoretic Hebrew'. In Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics, edited by Geoffrey Khan et al. Leiden: Brill Online. ———. 2013b. 'Shewa: Pre-Modern Hebrew'. In Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics ...

Studies in Semitic Vocalisation and Reading Traditions

This volume brings together papers relating to the pronunciation of Semitic languages and the representation of their pronunciation in written form. The papers focus on sources representative of a period that stretches from late antiquity until the Middle Ages. A large proportion of them concern reading traditions of Biblical Hebrew, especially the vocalisation notation systems used to represent them. Also discussed are orthography and the written representation of prosody. Beyond Biblical Hebrew, there are studies concerning Punic, Biblical Aramaic, Syriac, and Arabic, as well as post-biblical traditions of Hebrew such as piyyuṭ and medieval Hebrew poetry. There were many parallels and interactions between these various language traditions and the volume demonstrates that important insights can be gained from such a wide range of perspectives across different historical periods.

Contact and Ideology in a Multilingual Community

Encyclopedia of Hebrew language and linguistics. Brill online. Samet, Moshe. 1988. The beginning of Orthodoxy. Modern Judaism 8(3). 249–269. Sasaki, Tsuguya. 1993. hamarkiv ha'ivri arami bayidish: torat hatsurot vetorathamashma'ut [The ...

Contact and Ideology in a Multilingual Community

This book presents the role of ideology in language contact situations and the scope of its influence on linguistic behavior. It will also provide an important addition to the field of Yiddish linguistics.

A Handbook of Biblical Hebrew

2013 Matres Lectionis: Biblical Hebrew. Pp. 607–11 in vol. 2 of Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics, ed. Geoffrey Khan. Leiden: Brill. Bendavid, Abba 1967–71 םימכח ןושלו ארקמ ןושל [Biblical Hebrew and Mishnaic Hebrew].

A Handbook of Biblical Hebrew

Volume 1: Periods, Corpora, and Reading Traditions; Volume 2: Selected Texts Biblical Hebrew is studied worldwide by university students, seminarians, and the educated public. It is also studied, almost universally, through a single prism—that of the Tiberian Masoretic tradition, which is the best attested and most widely available tradition of Biblical Hebrew. Thanks in large part to its endorsement by Maimonides, it also became the most prestigious vocalization tradition in the Middle Ages. For most, Biblical Hebrew is synonymous with Tiberian Biblical Hebrew. There are, however, other vocalization traditions. The Babylonian tradition was widespread among Jews around the close of the first millennium CE; the tenth-century Karaite scholar al-Qirqisani reports that the Babylonian pronunciation was in use in Babylonia, Iran, the Arabian peninsula, and Yemen. And despite the fact that Yemenite Jews continued using Babylonian manuscripts without interruption from generation to generation, European scholars learned of them only toward the middle of the nineteenth century. Decades later, manuscripts pointed with the Palestinian vocalization system were rediscovered in the Cairo Genizah. Thereafter came the discovery of manuscripts written according to the Tiberian-Palestinian system and, perhaps most importantly, the texts found in caves alongside the Dead Sea. What is still lacking, however, is a comprehensive and systematic overview of the different periods, sources, and traditions of Biblical Hebrew. This handbook provides students and the public with easily accessible, reliable, and current information in English concerning the multi-faceted nature of Biblical Hebrew. Noted scholars in each of the various fields contributed their expertise. The result is the present two-volume work. The first contains an in-depth introduction to each tradition; and the second presents sample accompanying texts that exemplify the descriptions of the parallel introductory chapters.

Hebrew Texts and Language of the Second Temple Period

Proceedings of an Eighth Symposium on the Hebrew of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Ben Sira ... time and again in the entries in the recent Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics (“Matres Lectionis: Biblical Hebrew”; “Infinitive, ...

Hebrew Texts and Language of the Second Temple Period

Hebrew Texts and Language of the Second Temple Period presents discussions on textual and linguistic aspects of the Dead Sea Scrolls and of Second Temple Hebrew corpora.