Justice Going to Law

Justice Going to Law


Civil Procedure of the Trial Court in Historical Perspective

On the other hand, the single volume American law books receiving the label of greatness would make a sparse list indeed. To this elite list must now be added Professor Millar's Civil Procedure of the Trial Court in Historical Perspective.

Civil Procedure of the Trial Court in Historical Perspective

Millar, Robert Wyness. Civil Procedure of the Trial Court in Historical Perspective. New York: Published by the Law Center of New York University for the National Conference of Judicial Councils, 1952. xvi, 534 pp. Reprint available November 2004 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. ISBN 1-58477-458-4. Cloth. $95. * Reprint of a title from the Judicial Administration Series published by the National Conference of Judicial Councils. Millar [1876-1959], a professor at Northwestern University Law School, was a leading authority on civil procedure and its history. Written near the end of his career, the present study is a brilliant summary of his life's work. It discusses antecedents of the Anglo-American system, the evolution of procedure and American and English civil procedure in the nineteenth century. Other chapters discuss the development of specific areas, such as introduction of the cause, mode of trial and voluntary dismissal.

English Civil Procedure

English Civil Procedure


The Three Paths of Justice

This book presents a concise account of the English system of civil litigation, covering court proceedings in England and Wales.

The Three Paths of Justice

This book presents a concise account of the English system of civil litigation, covering court proceedings in England and Wales. It is an original and important study of a system which is the historical root of the US litigation system. The volume offers a comprehensive and properly balanced account of the entire range of dispute resolution techniques. As the first book on this subject to be published in the USA, it enables American lawyers to gain an overview of the main institutions of English Civil Procedure, including mediation and arbitration. It will render the English system of civil justice accessible to law students in the US, practitioners of law, professors, judges, and policy-makers.

Going to Law

Going to Law


English Civil Procedure

This is a systematic and analytical account of the new system of civil procedure and justice in England and Wales.

English Civil Procedure

This is a systematic and analytical account of the new system of civil procedure and justice in England and Wales. The book is both comprehensive and detailed, focusing in particular on the fundamental principles that underlie the post-Woolf system. These include the principles set out in the Woolf reforms themselves, principles relating to civil justice derived from the Human Rights Act and ECHR, and older common law principles that continue to apply. This book will provide a much-needed commentary to the Civil Procedure Rules.

Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights in Dutch English and German Civil Procedure

Although this book will repay the study of anyone interested in European law, it will be of special value to practitioners and policymakers engaged in intellectual property law, particularly in EU Member States.

Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights in Dutch  English and German Civil Procedure

EU Directive 2004/48 EC obliges Member States to seek to achieve ‘partial harmonization’ of the remedies, procedures and measures necessary to enforce intellectual property law. These obligations provide what may be termed a minimum standard which must be fulfilled by the Member States in the course of their implementation of the Directive. However, the Directive is not faring well at the Member State level. The three authors’ vastly detailed, article-by-article analysis of the fortunes of Directive 2004/48 EC in three EU jurisdictions offers enormously valuable insights into the complex ways Member States respond to Community law, and in so doing provides an important addition to the ongoing inquiry into the nature of the reciprocal tensions between EU law (both judicial and legislative) and the laws of Member States. The particular investigation undertaken here reveals three paradigmatic situations: the situation in which the Directive has not been implemented at all, either because the Member State believes that its current legislation is adequate or that the wording of the Directive is such that no special legislation is required (England); the situation in which implementation has been inadequate, because either the pre-existing legislation constitutes inadequate legislation or because the specifically adopted legislation proves to be legally uncertain (The Netherlands); and the situation in which the relevant time for implementation for the Directive has elapsed and no specific legislation has been adopted (Germany). If there really is, as the European Commission contends, an ‘enforcement deficit’ in the protection of intellectual property rights by national rules of procedure, then the most effective remedial approach, Cummings shows, is through the principles of legal certainty, full effect, and effective judicial protection. These principles will assist the national court in interpretation of the precise meaning of the substantive obligations under the Directive. Drawing on the tenor of ECJ law that national procedural rules should not present an obstacle to adequate judicial protection, the author considers the conditions that must be fulfilled before an eventual claimant, who has suffered loss and damage caused by either the non-implementation or the incorrect implementation of a directive, may bring an action against the State for breach of Community law. The author presents his analyses of the implementation of the Directive in Dutch and English national procedure and his proposals for German implementation as three separate cases rather than comparatively, as any attempt to compare either the method of national implementation or the degree of adequacy or inadequacy inevitably obscures the essential particularities of each of the three national systems in relation to the Directive. Although this book will repay the study of anyone interested in European law, it will be of special value to practitioners and policymakers engaged in intellectual property law, particularly in EU Member States.

Civil Procedure in Japan

The only book of its kind available in English, Civil Procedure in Japan is the most reliable and comprehensive reference on the broad subject of the Japanese civil justice system.

Civil Procedure in Japan

The only book of its kind available in English, Civil Procedure in Japan is the most reliable and comprehensive reference on the broad subject of the Japanese civil justice system. Civil Procedure in Japan discusses the problems encountered in litigating a civil controversy in the chronological order in which they are most likely to arise. Since civil procedure, as all law, is a product of historical developments and since it cannot be understood without reference to the political structure within it is to operate, Chapter 1 presents the historical background to date of the development of court procedure. The chapter looks at Japan's political organization (Executive, Legislative, etc), the court structure, and the sources of law. Chapter 2 is devoted to a look at the world of Japanese Legal Profession including legal education and non-Japanese lawyers in Japan, while Chapter 3 is an overview of the Judiciary as a whole. Chapter 4 sets forth the basic concepts involved in the judiciary authority and its interface with other governmental authorities. Subsequent chapters deal with practical issues of civil procedure, starting with Chapter 5 through Chapter 8, the trial is traced from beginning (parties to action and pre-commencement preparation including provisional remedies) through appellate procedures. Chapters 8 and 9 deal with various judicial proceedings outside of typical civil actions. Chapter 11 specifically explains various insolvency proceedings from straight bankruptcy to corporate reorganization. Chapter 12 is devoted to the arbitration law of 2002. Chapter 13 is about various terms of the court costs. Enforcement of civil judgments is treated in detail in Chapter 14. Finally, Chapter 15 is reserved for international cooperation in litigation and sets forth Japan's bilateral arrangements for international co-operation. Furthermore, appendices include an English translation of the Code and Rules of Civil Procedure of 1996 and other important statutes, English translations of sample judgments, glossaries, bibliography, ect.

Reforming Civil Procedure

This book makes a strong contribution to the field by synthesising the work of English writers with different views, extending the work in England on the role of philosophy, values, process and culture in litigation, and engaging ...

Reforming Civil Procedure

Drawing on political, social and economic theory, Reforming Civil Procedure focuses on the English civil justice system by looking at its history and its processes. The book considers the objectives of civil procedure and how it operates for and against particular societal groups, and what ideas and behaviours impact upon it. The reform of civil procedure has been beset with difficulties. Some are caused by questions of culture and mind-sets resistant to the changes, some by a confusion and conflict of values, some by overambitious reform efforts, some by a failure to follow through on purpose clauses, and some by swinging from laxity to rigidity with insufficient analysis. This book makes a strong contribution to the field by synthesising the work of English writers with different views, extending the work in England on the role of philosophy, values, process and culture in litigation, and engaging extensively with American writers who have not previously been the subject of much attention in English civil procedural studies.

Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights in Dutch English and German Civil Procedure

Although this book will repay the study of anyone interested in European law, it will be of special value to practitioners and policymakers engaged in intellectual property law, particularly in EU Member States.

Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights in Dutch  English and German Civil Procedure

EU Directive 2004/48 EC obliges Member States to seek to achieve 'partial harmonization' of the remedies, procedures and measures necessary to enforce intellectual property law. These obligations provide what may be termed a minimum standard which must be fulfilled by the Member States in the course of their implementation of the Directive. However, the Directive is not faring well at the Member State level. The three authors' vastly detailed, article-by-article analysis of the fortunes of Directive 2004/48 EC in three EU jurisdictions offers enormously valuable insights into the complex ways Member States respond to Community law, and in so doing provides an important addition to the ongoing inquiry into the nature of the reciprocal tensions between EU law (both judicial and legislative) and the laws of Member States. The particular investigation undertaken here reveals three paradigmatic situations: the situation in which the Directive has not been implemented at all, either because the Member State believes that its current legislation is adequate or that the wording of the Directive is such that no special legislation is required (England); the situation in which implementation has been inadequate, because either the pre-existing legislation constitutes inadequate legislation or because the specifically adopted legislation proves to be legally uncertain (The Netherlands); and the situation in which the relevant time for implementation for the Directive has elapsed and no specific legislation has been adopted (Germany). If there really is, as the European Commission contends, an 'enforcement deficit' in the protection of intellectual property rights by national rules of procedure, then the most effective remedial approach, Cummings shows, is through the principles of legal certainty, full effect, and effective judicial protection. These principles will assist the national court in interpretation of the precise meaning of the substantive obligations under the Directive. Drawing on the tenor of ECJ law that national procedural rules should not present an obstacle to adequate judicial protection, the author considers the conditions that must be fulfilled before an eventual claimant, who has suffered loss and damage caused by either the non-implementation or the incorrect implementation of a directive, may bring an action against the State for breach of Community law. The author presents his analyses of the implementation of the Directive in Dutch and English national procedure and his proposals for German implementation as three separate cases rather than comparatively, as any attempt to compare either the method of national implementation or the degree of adequacy or inadequacy inevitably obscures the essential particularities of each of the three national systems in relation to the Directive. Although this book will repay the study of anyone interested in European law, it will be of special value to practitioners and policymakers engaged in intellectual property law, particularly in EU Member States.

Civil Procedure in EU Competition Cases Before the English and Dutch Courts

As the authors of this book clearly demonstrate, this suggests a binary system governing the enforcement of EC Articles 81 and 82: namely, that led by the Commission through directives and eventual regulations, and that built on ECJ ...

Civil Procedure in EU Competition Cases Before the English and Dutch Courts

For decades it seemed clear that EC competition law was enforceable effectively at the national level, and ECJ case law has continued to bear this out. In recent years, however, the Commission has been proposing harmonization of national rules of procedure in competition cases, implying that procedural autonomy is insufficient on its own to produce an effective enforcement system in this area. As the authors of this book clearly demonstrate, this suggests a binary system governing the enforcement of EC Articles 81 and 82: namely, that led by the Commission through directives and eventual regulations, and that built on ECJ principles in areas not dealt with by such Community instruments. This book describes and analyzes not only the specific Commission recommendations, but also the manner and extent to which these recommendations are or may be implemented in civil procedure. In particular, the authors consider changes which may be required if these recommendations are incorporated into Dutch and English rules of civil procedure. Also addressed are elements of procedure not mentioned by the Commission but which might usefully be considered in the context of ECJ principles of effectiveness, equivalence and effective judicial protection of rights. At the heart of the study is a detailed analysis of the Commission White Paper on Damages Actions and the Commission Staff Working Paper, both issued early in 2009. The in-depth analysis ranges over procedural aspects of such elements as the following: and•standing; and•disclosure and access to evidence; and•burden of proof; and•fault/no fau and•costs of damages actions; and•injunctions; and•civil versus administrative enforcement; and•limitations; and•leniency programmes; and•collective actions; and•confidentiality; and and•forms of compensation. Anticipating as it does a looming impasse in European competition law, this remarkable book sheds defining light on the real implications of EC competition law for parties to damages actions, not only in the national systems studied but for all Member States. For practitioners and jurists it offers a particularly useful approach to the handling of cases involving European competition law, and also serves as a guide to current trends and as a clarification of doctrine.

Civil Procedure Used for Enforcement of EC Competition Law by the English French and German Civil Courts

English, French and German Civil Procedure --English Procedure: Evidence --English Procedure: Conditional Costs --English Procedure: Expert Evidence and Assessors --English Procedure: Disclosure --English Procedure: Costs --English Interim ...

Civil Procedure Used for Enforcement of EC Competition Law by the English  French and German Civil Courts

European competition law has been increasingly subject to two complementary forces: decentralisation and harmonisation. In the course of this process, certain procedural elements have come to the fore as constituting impediments to the enforcement of Articles 81 and 82 EC in terms of actions for damages. While ECJ case law appears to establish a type of 'minimum' enforcement in this area, the far-reaching analysis presented in this book shows how an 'adequate' or even 'optimal' degree of enforcement may be achieved by effecting a choice between competing procedural solutions. Focusing on rules of civil procedure used by the ordinary courts of England, France, and Germany, the authors show how basic principles - such as protection of the rights of the defence, legal certainty, and proper conduct of the procedure - facilitate the application of the doctrines of effectiveness and non-discrimination to those elements of the national procedure which impede in some manner the effective enforcement of Articles 81 and 82 EC. Their in-depth analysis ranges over procedural aspects of such elements as rules of evidence, costs, expert testimony, injunctions, burden of proof, limitations, and forms of compensation, ultimately leading them to propose clear modifications of certain rules of national procedure that go a long way toward ensuring adequately effective enforcement. This remarkable book breaks through an impasse in European competition law. It serves to steady the balance which has been sought between the different actors of the procedure in each of the national systems studied. For practitioners and jurists it offers a particularly useful approach to the handling of cases involving European competition law, and also serves as a guide by reason of its clear presentation, its clarification of doctrine, and its analysis of national and European case law.

Legalese to English Civil Procedure

Elura Nanos, Michele Sileo. Library of Congress CataloginginPublication Data Nanos, Elura. Legaleseto English:civil procedure/byEluraNanos&Michele Sileo. p. cm. ISBN13: 9780837739861 1. Civil procedureUnited States. I. Sileo, Michele.

Legalese to English  Civil Procedure

The first study guide that presents the substantive material necessary to succeed in Civil Procedure through a structured and interactive approach, in simple and straightforward language. Provides a proven plan for students on how to manage their time, what to study and why, in order to help them organize and test their knowledge. Each guide includes: easy-to-follow explanations of tough concepts with clear examples; workbook-style questions and answers; writing exercises focused on exam-type analysis; time-management strategies; and templates for drafting outlines.