Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages 800 1050

Of particular importance was the combination of saintly subject with epic form. During the Central Middle Ages (ca. 800—1100), a church's patron saints, manifest in their relics, were its main source of influence and revenue.

Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages  800 1050

This is the first book to focus on Latin epic verse saints' lives in their medieval historical contexts. Anna Taylor examines how these works promoted bonds of friendship and expressed rivalries among writers, monasteries, saints, earthly patrons, teachers, and students in Western Europe in the central middle ages. Using philological, codicological, and microhistorical approaches, Professor Taylor reveals new insights that will reshape our understanding of monasticism, patronage, and education. These texts give historians an unprecedented glimpse inside the early medieval classroom, provide a nuanced view of the complicated synthesis of the Christian and Classical heritages, and show the cultural importance and varied functions of poetic composition in the ninth, tenth, and eleventh centuries.

Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages 800 1050

This is the first book to focus on Latin epic verse saints' lives in their medieval historical contexts.

Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages  800 1050

This is the first book to focus on Latin epic verse saints' lives in their medieval historical contexts.

Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages 800 1050

This is the first book to focus on Latin epic verse saints' lives in their medieval historical contexts.

Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages  800   1050

This is the first book to focus on Latin epic verse saints' lives in their medieval historical contexts. Anna Taylor examines how these works promoted bonds of friendship and expressed rivalries among writers, monasteries, saints, earthly patrons, teachers and students in Western Europe in the central Middle Ages. Using philological, codicological and microhistorical approaches, Professor Taylor reveals new insights that will reshape our understanding of monasticism, patronage and education. These texts give historians an unprecedented glimpse inside the early medieval classroom, provide a nuanced view of the complicated synthesis of the Christian and Classical heritages, and show the cultural importance and varied functions of poetic composition in the ninth, tenth and eleventh centuries.

The Oxford Handbook of Christian Monasticism

There was no unanimity among medieval legislators about how to deal with these problems . ... A path - breaking contribution is Anna Taylor's Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages , 800-1050 , which examines the social ...

The Oxford Handbook of Christian Monasticism

The Handbook takes as its subject the complex phenomenon of Christian monasticism. It addresses, for the first time in one volume, the multiple strands of Christian monastic practice. Forty-four essays consider historical and thematic aspects of the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Protestant, and Anglican traditions, as well as contemporary 'new monasticism'. The essays in the book span a period of nearly two thousand years—from late ancient times, through the medieval and early modern eras, on to the present day. Taken together, they offer, not a narrative survey, but rather a map of the vast terrain. The intention of the Handbook is to provide a balance of some essential historical coverage with a representative sample of current thinking on monasticism. It presents the work of both academic and monastic authors, and the essays are best understood as a series of loosely-linked episodes, forming a long chain of enquiry, and allowing for various points of view. The authors are a diverse and international group, who bring a wide range of critical perspectives to bear on pertinent themes and issues. They indicate developing trends in their areas of specialisation. The individual contributions, and the volume as a whole, set out an agenda for the future direction of monastic studies. In today's world, where there is increasing interest in all world monasticisms, where scholars are adopting more capacious, global approaches to their investigations, and where monks and nuns are casting a fresh eye on their ancient traditions, this publication is especially timely.

Universal Chronicles in the High Middle Ages

22 On epic hagiography in the tenth and eleventh centuries, see most recently Anna Lisa Taylor, Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages, 8001050 (Cambridge, 2013). 23 Chronicon Vedastinum, ed.

Universal Chronicles in the High Middle Ages

New perspectives on and interpretations of the popular medieval genre of the universal chronicle.

Dark Age Nunneries

La Belgique ancienne et moderne: Géographie et histoire des communes Belges; Province de Brabant; Arrondissement de Nivelles. 2 vols. Brussels: A. Decq, 1873. Taylor, Anna Lisa. Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages, 8001050.

Dark Age Nunneries

Dark Age Nunneries -- Contents -- List of Illustrations -- Preface and Acknowledgments -- Abbreviations -- Introduction -- 1. Setting the Boundaries for Legitimate Experimentation -- 2. Holy Vessels, Brides of Christ: Ambiguous Ninth-Century Realities -- 3. Transitions, Continuities, and the Struggle for Monastic Lordship -- 4. Reforms, Semi-Reforms, and the Silencing of Women Religious in the Tenth Century -- 5. New Beginnings -- 6. Monastic Ambiguities in the New Millennium -- Conclusion -- Appendix A: The Leadership and Members of Female Religious Communities in Lotharingia, 816-1059 -- Appendix B: The Decrees on Women Religious from the Acts of the Synod of Chalon-sur-Saône, 813, and the Council of Mainz, 847 -- Appendix C: Jacques de Guise's Account of the Attempted Reform of Nivelles and Other Female Institutions in the Early Ninth Century -- Appendix D: The Compilation on the Roll of Maubeuge, c. Early Eleventh Century -- Appendix E: Letter by Abbess Thiathildis of Remiremont to Emperor Louis the Pious, c. 820s-840 -- Appendix F: John of Gorze's Encounter with Geisa, c. 920s-930s -- Appendix G: Extract on Women Religious from the Protocol of the Synod of Rome (1059) -- Appendix H: The Eviction of the Religious of Pfalzel as Recounted in the Gesta Treverorum, 1016 -- Appendix I: The Life of Ansoaldis, Abbess of Maubeuge (d. 1050) -- Appendix J: Letter by Pope Paschalis II to Abbess Ogiva of Messines (1107) -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- Q -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- Z

Religious Horror and Holy War in Viking Age Francia

149 Anna Taylor, Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages, 800-1050 (Cambridge, 2013), 28-45 describes these stylistic features of monastic epic lives to which Abbo's epic was indebted; Ebenbauer, Carmen, 282-283 discusses Abbo's ...

Religious Horror and Holy War in Viking Age Francia

Religious Horror and Holy War in Viking Age Francia explores how authorities in western Francia used horror rhetoric to cast Christian soldiers, who robbed the poor and the church, as monsters that devoured human flesh and drank human blood. Adapting modern literary horror approaches to medieval sources, this study reveals how such rhetoric served as a form of spiritual weaponry in the clergy's attempts to correct and condemn wayward military men. This investigation, therefore, unearths long-forgotten Carolingian thought about the dreadful spiritual reality of internal enemies during a time of political division and the Northmens depredations. Yet such horror also informed a new understanding of Christian heroism that developed in relation to the wars fought against the invaders. This vision of heroic soldiers, which included military martyrs, culminated in ideas about holy war against the pagans. Thus Carolingian religious horror and holy war together belonged to a body of ideas about the spiritual, unseen side of the church's cosmic conflict against evil that foreshadowed later medieval Crusading thought.

The Illustrated Afterlife of Terence s Comedies 800 1200

In Beyond the Fifth Century: Interactions with Greek Tragedy from the Fourth Century BCE to the Middle Ages, edited by Ingo Gildenhard and Martin Revermann, 335–70. ... Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages, 8001050.

The Illustrated Afterlife of Terence   s Comedies  800   1200

This is a book about Roman comedy, ancient theatre imagery, and seven medieval illustrated manuscripts of Terence’s six Latin comedies. These manuscript illustrations, made between 800 and 1200, enabled their medieval readers to view these comedies as “mirrors of life”.

Inscribing Knowledge in the Medieval Book

Zeitschrift der Savigny-Stiftung für Rechtsgeschichte: Kanonistische Abteilung 70 (1984): 67–133. Taylor 2013: Taylor, Anna Lisa. Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages, 8001050. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013.

Inscribing Knowledge in the Medieval Book

This collection of essays examines how the paratextual apparatus of medieval manuscripts both inscribes and expresses power relations between the producers and consumers of knowledge in this important period of intellectual history. It seeks to define which paratextual features – annotations, commentaries, corrections, glosses, images, prologues, rubrics, and titles – are common to manuscripts from different branches of medieval knowledge and how they function in any particular discipline. It reveals how these visual expressions of power that organize and compile thought on the written page are consciously applied, negotiated or resisted by authors, scribes, artists, patrons and readers. This collection, which brings together scholars from the history of the book, law, science, medicine, literature, art, philosophy and music, interrogates the role played by paratexts in establishing authority, constructing bodies of knowledge, promoting education, shaping reader response, and preserving or subverting tradition in medieval manuscript culture.

Creative Lives in Classical Antiquity

Ithaca, NY Taylor, A.L. (2013) Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages: 800-1050. Cambridge Taylor, C. (1989) The Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity. Cambridge Thomas, R. (1989) Oral Tradition and Written ...

Creative Lives in Classical Antiquity

This book examines how the biographical traditions of ancient poets and artists parallel the creative processes of biographers themselves, both within antiquity and beyond. Each chapter explores a range of biographical material that highlights the complexity of how readers and viewers imagine the lives of ancient creator-figures.

Fiction Memory and Identity in the Cult of St Maurus 830 1270

... a classicizing, versified Life of Maurus composed about the same time and attributed to Foucoie, archdeacon of ... in epic poetic style, see Anna Lisa Taylor, Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages, 8001050 (Cambridge U.P., ...

Fiction  Memory  and Identity in the Cult of St  Maurus  830 1270

This book explores one of the most significant medieval saints cults, that of St. Maurus, the first known disciple of Saint Benedict. Despite the centrality of this story to the myth of medieval Benedictine culture, no major scholarly work has been devoted to Maurus since the late nineteenth century. Drawing on memory studies, this book investigates the origins and history of the cult, from the ninth-century Life of St. Maurus by Odo, abbot of Glanfueil, to its appropriation and re-shaping by three powerful abbeys through to the thirteenth centuryFosses, Cluny, and Montecassino. It traces how these institutions deployed caches of mostly forged documents (many translated here for the first time) to adapt the cult to their aspirations and, moreover, considers how the cult adapted itself further, to face the challenges of the modern world. John B. Wickstrom is Professor Emeritus at Kalamazoo College, USA.

Deeds of the Bishops of Cambrai Translation and Commentary

Taylor, Anna L., Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages 8001050 (Cambridge, 2013). Thomas, Heinz, Studien zur Trierer Geschichtsschreibung des 11: Jahrhunderts, insbesondere zu den Gesta Treverorum (Bonn, 1968).

Deeds of the Bishops of Cambrai  Translation and Commentary

First commissioned by Bishop Gerard I of Cambrai (1012-1051) in 1023 or 1024, the Gesta episcoporum Cameracensium was the work of two authors, the second of whom completed the text shortly after the death of Bishop Gerard. The three books of the Gesta shed considerable light on the policies and actions of many of the key political and religious figures in an economically and intellectually vibrant region on the frontier between the German and French kingdoms. The Deeds of the Bishops of Cambrai, translated in this volume into English for the first time, provides unique insights into the relationship between the German king and the bishops within the context of the so-called imperial church system, the rise of both secular and ecclesiastical territorial lordships, the conduct of war, the cult of the saints, monastic reform, and evolving conceptions of the proper social order of society. Including extensive commentary, apparatus of explanatory notes, maps, genealogies, this text will be of considerable value both in undergraduate and graduate courses as well as to scholars.

Writing Normandy

Most scholars now agree that it is unwise to impose modern categories on medieval subjects ... the boundaries between ... Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages, 8001050 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013) and Steffen ...

Writing Normandy

Writing Normandy brings together eighteen articles by historian Felice Lifshitz, some of which are published here for the first time. The articles examine the various ways in which local and regional narratives about the past were created and revised in Normandy during the central Middle Ages. These narratives are analyzed through a combination of both cultural studies and manuscript studies in order to assess how they functioned, who they benefitted, and the various contexts in which they were transmitted. The essays pay particular attention to the narratives built around venerated saints and secular rulers, and in doing so bring together narratives that have traditionally been discussed separately by scholars. The book will appeal to scholars and students of cultural history and medieval history, as well as those interested in manuscript studies. .

On Hospitals

Welfare, Law, and Christianity in Western Europe, 400-1320 Sethina Watson, Senior Lecturer in Medieval History ... au Moyen Age (Paris, 1999), 89–96 Taylor, A. L., Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages, 8001050 (Cambridge, ...

On Hospitals

This ground-breaking study explores welfare institutions in western law in the middle ages and establishes, for the first time, a legal model for the hospital. On Hospitals takes us beyond canon law, Carolingian capitularies, and Justinian's Code and Novels, to late Roman testamentary law, identifying new legislation and legal initiatives in every period. In challenging long established orthodoxies, a new history of the hospital emerges, one that is fundamentally a European history. To the history of law, it offers an unusual lens through which to explore canon law. What this monograph identifies for the first time is that the absence of law is the key. This is a study of what happened when there was no legal inheritance, nor even an authority through which to act. Here, at the fringes of law, pioneers worked, and forgers played. Their efforts shed light on councils, both familiar and forgotten, and on major figures, including Abbot Ansegis of Saint Wandrille, Abbot Wala of Corbie, the Pseudo-Isidorian forgers, Pope Alexander III, Bernard of Pavia, and Robert de Courson. Finally On Hospitals offers a new picture of welfare at the heart of Christianity. The place of welfare houses, at the edge of law, has for too long encouraged an assumption that welfare itself was peripheral to popes and canonists and so, by implication, to those who designed the priorities of the Church. This study reveals the central place for them all, across a thousand years, of Christian caritas. We discover a Christian foundation that could belong not to the Church, but to the whole society of the faithful.

The Journey of Deacon Bodo from the Rhine to the Guadalquivir

Szpiech, R. 2013, Conversion and Narrative: Readings and Religious Authority in Medieval Polemic, Philadelphia. Taylor, A.L. 2013, Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages, 8001050, Cambridge. Thacker, A. 2000, 'Peculiaris ...

The Journey of Deacon Bodo from the Rhine to the Guadalquivir

The story of Bodo begins in the ninth century around the time of the death of Charlemagne in 814. It centres on a young Aleman aristocrat and his conversion to Judaism in 838, followed by his flight to the Muslim world of Al-Andalus. His apostasy constitutes an arresting footnote in the history of the Carolingian period, his change of faith viewed as a shocking episode attributed by some to an overly lax policy towards Judaism and its powerful merchants. Another factor could be ascribed to the study of Judaism and its links with Christianity, which was a feature of the time. Bodo moved from a monastery on the Rhine, where he went as a small boy, to the imperial court, where he was now a gifted young scholar groomed for a top position. His unexpected abandonment of Christianity challenged his background and learning, and this was seen as a rebuke of the court network to which he belonged. Bodo left behind a growing conflict over succession between the emperor, Louis the Pious, and his sons that culminated in a civil war following the emperor’s death. As a result, the Frankish Empire was partitioned into three separate kingdoms in 843. Meanwhile in Spain, two years after fleeing the Frankish world, Bodo debated the merits of Judaism and Christianity in Córdoba with Albarus Paulus, a beleaguered Christian in the Muslim world, not only airing criticisms of Christianity, but also some failings of the Carolingian imperial court. In 847 he is mentioned in the court annals as stirring up opposition in Islamic Spain against Christians, asserting that they should be forced to convert or be executed. This reported incident may be linked to a significant number of self-imposed deaths by Christians who, feeling increasingly persecuted, sought to provoke Islam by denouncing the Prophet and bringing about their execution. The experience of Bodo’s apostasy was far from unique: other men and women who renounced Christianity for Judaism are also examined in conversion narratives recorded in the following two centuries. These episodes offer an illuminating study of religious changes taking place in Europe and the East where Christianity, Islam and Judaism competed in the ninth century and beyond. Bodo’s experience can be viewed as part of a wider phenomenon depicting men and women who travelled as pilgrims, refugees or converts seeking to find a home and escape persecution because of their beliefs.

Hincmar of Rheims

250–6; A. L. Taylor, Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages, 8001050 (New York, 2013), pp. 55– 63. 12 On Adalard, see B. Kasten, Adalhard von Corbie: die Biographie eines karolingischen Politikers und Klostervorstehers ...

Hincmar of Rheims

Archbishop Hincmar of Rheims (d. 882) is a crucial figure for all those interested in early medieval European history in general, and Carolingian history in particular. For forty years he was an advisor to kings and religious controversialist; his works are a key source for the political, religious and social history of the later ninth century, covering topics from papal politics to the abduction of women and the role of parish priests. For the first time since Jean Devisse’s biography of Hincmar in the 1970s, this book offers a three-dimensional examination of a figure whose actions and writings in different fields are often studied in isolation. It brings together the latest international research across the spectrum of his varied activities, as history-writer, estate administrator, hagiographer, canonist, pastorally engaged bishop, and politically minded royal advisor. The introduction also provides the first substantial English-language survey of Hincmar’s whole career.

The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West

Sources for the History of Monasticism in the Central Middle Ages men (cynocephali) who allegedly dwelt in the far north of Europe had humans ... 49 Anna Taylor, Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages, 8001050 (Cambridge, 2013).

The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West

Monasticism, in all of its variations, was a feature of almost every landscape in the medieval West. So ubiquitous were religious women and men throughout the Middle Ages that all medievalists encounter monasticism in their intellectual worlds. While there is enormous interest in medieval monasticism among Anglophone scholars, language is often a barrier to accessing some of the most important and groundbreaking research emerging from Europe. The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West offers a comprehensive treatment of medieval monasticism, from Late Antiquity to the end of the Middle Ages. The essays, specially commissioned for this volume and written by an international team of scholars, with contributors from Australia, Belgium, Canada, England, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States, cover a range of topics and themes and represent the most up-to-date discoveries on this topic.

The Gastronomical Arts in Spain

Bernard of Clairvaux on the Life of the Mind. Mahwah, NJ: Paulist. Taylor, Anna Lisa. 2013. Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages, 8001050. ... The Book of Sent Sovrí: Medieval Recipes from Catalonia (Llibre de Sent Sovri).

The Gastronomical Arts in Spain

The Gastronomical Arts in Spain includes essays that span from the medieval to the contemporary world, providing a taste of the many ways in which the art of gastronomy developed in Spain over time. This collection encompasses a series of cultural objects and a number of interests, ranging from medicine to science, from meals to banquets, and from specific recipes to cookbooks. The contributors consider Spanish cuisine as presented in a variety of texts, including literature, medical and dietary prescriptions, historical documents, cookbooks, and periodicals. They draw on literary texts in their socio-historical context in order to explore concerns related to the production and consumption of food for reasons of hunger, sustenance, health, and even gluttony. Structured into three distinct "courses" that focus on the history of foodstuffs, food etiquette, and culinary fashion, The Gastronomical Arts in Spain brings together the many sights and sounds of the Spanish kitchen throughout the centuries.

Hilduin of Saint Denis

Spiegel, G.M., 'The Cult of Saint Denis and the Capetian Kingship', Journalof Medieval History 1 (1975), 43–69 [repr. in Saints and their Cults ... Taylor, A.L., Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages, 8001050 (Cambridge, 2013).

Hilduin of Saint Denis

St Dionysius was one of the principal saints of medieval France. He is known largely through the writings of Hilduin, the powerful abbot of Saint-Denis in Paris (814–40), who described the life and martyrdom of the saint in prose and verse. Both versions are edited here, with facing-page English translation and commentary.

The Muratorian Fragment

Stunt, Timothy C. F. The Life and Times of Samuel Prideaux Tregelles: A Forgotten Scholar. Christianities in the Trans-Atlantic World. ... Epic Lives and Monasticism in the Middle Ages, 8001050. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ...

The Muratorian Fragment