Eros and Magic in the Renaissance

Eros and Magic in the Renaissance challenges this view, providing an in-depth scholarly explanation of the workings of magic and showing that magic continues to exist in an altered form even today.

Eros and Magic in the Renaissance

It is a widespread prejudice of modern, scientific society that "magic" is merely a ludicrous amalgam of recipes and methods derived from primitive and erroneous notions about nature. Eros and Magic in the Renaissance challenges this view, providing an in-depth scholarly explanation of the workings of magic and showing that magic continues to exist in an altered form even today. Renaissance magic, according to Ioan Couliano, was a scientifically plausible attempt to manipulate individuals and groups based on a knowledge of motivations, particularly erotic motivations. Its key principle was that everyone (and in a sense everything) could be influenced by appeal to sexual desire. In addition, the magician relied on a profound knowledge of the art of memory to manipulate the imaginations of his subjects. In these respects, Couliano suggests, magic is the precursor of the modern psychological and sociological sciences, and the magician is the distant ancestor of the psychoanalyst and the advertising and publicity agent. In the course of his study, Couliano examines in detail the ideas of such writers as Giordano Bruno, Marsilio Ficino, and Pico della Mirandola and illuminates many aspects of Renaissance culture, including heresy, medicine, astrology, alchemy, courtly love, the influence of classical mythology, and even the role of fashion in clothing. Just as science gives the present age its ruling myth, so magic gave a ruling myth to the Renaissance. Because magic relied upon the use of images, and images were repressed and banned in the Reformation and subsequent history, magic was replaced by exact science and modern technology and eventually forgotten. Couliano's remarkable scholarship helps us to recover much of its original significance and will interest a wide audience in the humanities and social sciences.

Eros Magic the Murder of Professor Culianu

world his study of Renaissance magic begun at age nineteen . Published by
Flammarion , Eros et magie à la Renaissance , 1484 ( Eros and Magic in the
Renaissance - 1484 ) was unlike almost anything that had come before in the
field .

Eros  Magic    the Murder of Professor Culianu

Investigates the murder of Ioan Culianu, a popular University of Chicago Divinity School Professor who was slain execution-style in May of 1991, the victim--according to the author--of right-wing political operatives in his native Romania. UP.

Science in a Renaissance Society

Science in a Renaissance Society


Music in Renaissance Magic

... somniis, in Opera omnia, pp. 1968-78). Much attention has been called in
recent years to Ficino's indebtedness to De insomniis, by Couliano (Eros and
Magic, pp. 113-17), Allen (Icastes, pp. 194-200), Kaske (Ficino, Three Books on
Life, pp.

Music in Renaissance Magic

Magic enjoyed a vigorous revival in sixteenth-century Europe, attaining a prestige lost for over a millennium and becoming, for some, a kind of universal philosophy. Renaissance music also suggested a form of universal knowledge through renewed interest in two ancient themes: the Pythagorean and Platonic "harmony of the celestial spheres" and the legendary effects of the music of bards like Orpheus, Arion, and David. In this climate, Renaissance philosophers drew many new and provocative connections between music and the occult sciences. In Music in Renaissance Magic, Gary Tomlinson describes some of these connections and offers a fresh view of the development of early modern thought in Italy. Raising issues essential to postmodern historiography—issues of cultural distance and our relationship to the others who inhabit our constructions of the past —Tomlinson provides a rich store of ideas for students of early modern culture, for musicologists, and for historians of philosophy, science, and religion. "A scholarly step toward a goal that many composers have aimed for: to rescue the idea of New Age Music—that music can promote spiritual well-being—from the New Ageists who have reduced it to a level of sonic wallpaper."—Kyle Gann, Village Voice "An exemplary piece of musical and intellectual history, of interest to all students of the Renaissance as well as musicologists. . . . The author deserves congratulations for introducing this new approach to the study of Renaissance music."—Peter Burke, NOTES "Gary Tomlinson's Music in Renaissance Magic: Toward a Historiography of Others examines the 'otherness' of magical cosmology. . . . [A] passionate, eloquently melancholy, and important book."—Anne Lake Prescott, Studies in English Literature

Astral High Magic De Imaginibus of Thabit Ibn Qurra

Interestingly, he presents them in a binary fashion, indicating the overarching
spread of the astrological magic utilizing, ... 61 Giordano Bruno, Theses de Magia
, cited in Culianu, Eros and Magic in the Renaissance (Chicago, 1987) at 91 62 ...

Astral High Magic  De Imaginibus of Thabit Ibn Qurra


John Dee

First published in 1987. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

John Dee

First published in 1987. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Eight Philosophers of the Italian Renaissance

Appendix - "The Medieval Antecendents of Renaissance Humanism"__

Eight Philosophers of the Italian Renaissance

Appendix - "The Medieval Antecendents of Renaissance Humanism"__

Witchcraft in the Middle Ages

Traces the origin, development and practice of medieval witchcraft throughout western Europe, and describes the movement's social and religious significance

Witchcraft in the Middle Ages

Traces the origin, development and practice of medieval witchcraft throughout western Europe, and describes the movement's social and religious significance

Plato s Ghost

Spiritualism in the American Renaissance Cathy Gutierrez. impressions of ... In
Eros and Magic in the Renaissance, loan Couliano writes of the magus tradition
that erotic love was the dominant metaphor for the magician's relation to the
world.

Plato s Ghost

In its day, spiritualism brought hundreds of thousands of Americans to s?ance tables and trance lectures. It has alternately been ridiculed as the apogee of fatuous credulity and hailed as a feminist movement. Its tricks have been exposed, its charlatans unmasked, and its heroes' names lost to posterity. In its day, however, its leaders were household names and politicians worried about capturing the Spiritualist vote. Cathy Gutierrez places Spiritualism in the context of the 19th-century American Renaissance. Although this epithet usually signifies the sudden blossoming of American letters, Gutierrez points to its original meaning: a cultural imagination enraptured with the past and the classics in particular, accompanied by a cultural efflorescence. Spiritualism, she contends, was the religious articulation of the American Renaissance, and the ramifications of looking backward for advice about the present were far-reaching. The Spiritualist movement, says Gutierrez, was a 'renaissance of the Renaissance,' a culture in love with history as much as it trumpeted progress and futurity, and an expression of what constituted religious hope among burgeoning technology and colonialism. Rejecting Christian ideas about salvation, Spiritualists embraced Platonic and Neoplatonic ideas. Humans were shot through with the divine, rather than seen as helpless and inexorably corrupt sinners in the hands of a transcendent, angry God. Gutierrez's study of this fascinating and important movement is organized thematically. She analyzes Spiritualist conceptions of memory, marriage, medicine, and minds, explores such phenomena as machines for contacting the dead, spirit-photography, the idea of eternal spiritual affinity (which implied the necessity for marriage reform), the connection between health and spirituality, and mesmerism.

Marriage Dowry and Citizenship in Late Medieval and Renaissance Italy

Rome: École Française de Rome, 1992 Couliano, Ioan P. Eros and Magic in the
Renaissance. Translated by Margaret Cook. Chicago: University of Chicago
Press, 1987. Courtemanche, Andrée. La richesse des femmes: Patrimoines et ...

Marriage  Dowry  and Citizenship in Late Medieval and Renaissance Italy

Through his research on the status of women in Florence and other Italian cities, Julius Kirshner helped to establish the socio-legal history of women in late medieval and Renaissance Italy and challenge the idea that Florentine women had an inferior legal position and civic status. In Marriage, Dowry, and Citizenship in Late Medieval and Renaissance Italy, Kirshner collects nine important essays which address these issues in Florence and the cities of northern and central Italy. Using a cross-disciplinary approach that draws on the methodologies of both social and legal history, the essays in this collection present a wealth of examples of daughters, wives, and widows acting as full-fledged social and legal actors. Revised and updated to reflect current scholarship, the essays in Marriage, Dowry, and Citizenship in Late Medieval and Renaissance Italy appear alongside an extended introduction which situates them within the broader field of Renaissance legal history.

The Lesser Key of Solomon

22 See I. P. Couliano, Eros and Magic in the Renaissance (Chicago: University of
Chicago Press, 1987), p. 167. 23 Described by Claudia Rohrbacher-Sticker, “
Mafteah Shelomoh: A New Acquisition of the British Library,” Jewish Studies ...

The Lesser Key of Solomon

A beautiful cloth edition, compiled from original manuscripts and fragments in the British Museum Library, Joseph Peterson's new presentation is the most complete and accurate edition of this famous magical grimoire. He goes togreat length to establish the provenance of each part, and possible derivative works, including critical analyses of all major variations, utilizing fresh translations of earlier magical texts and newly discovered Hebrew manuscripts of the original Key of Solomon. Includes reproductions of the original magical circles, tools, and seals of the spirits with variations of certain drawings from various sources and notae missing from earlier editions.

Man and Nature in the Renaissance

Considers ideologies and mutual effects of humanism, mysticism and the exact sciences, thereby integrating a study of early Scientific Revolution astronomy, mathematics and medicine with the intellectual, religious and philosophical milieu

Man and Nature in the Renaissance

Considers ideologies and mutual effects of humanism, mysticism and the exact sciences, thereby integrating a study of early Scientific Revolution astronomy, mathematics and medicine with the intellectual, religious and philosophical milieu

De Imaginibus 2nd Edition

Giordano Bruno, , cited in Culianu, (Chicago, 1987) at 91 Theses de Magia Eros
and Magic in the Renaissance In the linear logic of science, by definition it is
impossible that a thing be simultaneously A and not A, but this is, of course,
hardly ...

De Imaginibus 2nd Edition

De Imaginibus, "On Images" is, after Picatrix, the most important text for medieval and Renaissance astrological magic. De Imaginibus was written in the 9th century A.D. by Thabit Ibn Qurra and represents the height of astrological magic technique, using the full range of traditional astrological technique developed by the sophisticated Harranian Sabians. De Imaginibus explains how to create house based talismans, how to use horary questions to forecast and anchor talismans and how to tune talismans to individual natal charts. This edition contains the first ever English translation and commentary by the noted contemporary astrological magician, Christopher Warnock, as well as illustrations by the artist and contemporary mage Nigel Jackson.

Don Quixote and the Brilliant Name of Fire

1 cannot put it any more eloquently and passionately than the late loan P.
Couliano in his magisterial Eros and Magic in the Renaissance: Hence, one of
the goals of the reformation was to root out the cult of idols from the Church . . .
ultimately, ...

Don Quixote and the Brilliant Name of Fire

Don Quixote and the Brilliant Name of Fire reveals for the first time the true extent of the esoteric dimension of the classic Spanish work. References to cards of the Tarot deck, a means of progression on the inner journey, have long been noted in it; but Don Quixote and the Brilliant Name of Fire will show their full extent, as well as demonstrating spectacular visual representations of Hebrew letters of the Qabalah, and the strict allegory of psychic transformationin the way of the Shakespeare playsin which these symbols have their place. The close kinship of Don Quixote and the Shakespeare First Folio becomes plain, and their origin in a common author, neither Will Shakespeare nor Cervantes. www.thegreatpesher.com

TechGnosis

Couliano, Ioan P. Eros and Magic in the Renaissance, Translated by Margaret
Cook. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987. . The Tree of Gnosis: Gnostic
Mythology from Early Christianity to Modern Nihilism. New York: HarperCollins ...

TechGnosis

How does our fascination with technology intersect with the religious imagination? In TechGnosis—a cult classic now updated and reissued with a new afterword—Erik Davis argues that while the realms of the digital and the spiritual may seem worlds apart, esoteric and religious impulses have in fact always permeated (and sometimes inspired) technological communication. Davis uncovers startling connections between such seemingly disparate topics as electricity and alchemy; online roleplaying games and religious and occult practices; virtual reality and gnostic mythology; programming languages and Kabbalah. The final chapters address the apocalyptic dreams that haunt technology, providing vital historical context as well as new ways to think about a future defined by the mutant intermingling of mind and machine, nightmare and fantasy.

Jefferson s Demons

101 mystères littéraires: Edgar Wind, Pagan Mysteries in the Renaissance, 2nd
enlarged ed. (New York: Norton, 1969), 3; Ioan P. Culianu, Eros and Magic in the
Renaissance (Chicago: University of Chicago, 1987), 14475. 101 “character is ...

Jefferson s Demons

"I have often wondered for what good end the sensations of Grief could be intended." -- Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson suffered during his life from periodic bouts of dejection and despair, shadowed intervals during which he was full of "gloomy forebodings" about what lay ahead. Not long before he composed the Declaration of Independence, the young Jefferson lay for six weeks in idleness and ill health at Monticello, paralyzed by a mysterious "malady." Similar lapses were to recur during anxious periods in his life, often accompanied by violent headaches. In Jefferson's Demons, Michael Knox Beran illuminates an optimistic man's darker side -- Jefferson as we have rarely seen him before. The worst of these moments came after his wife died in 1782. But two years later, after being dispatched to Europe, Jefferson recovered nerve and spirit in the salons of Paris, where he fell in love with a beautiful young artist, Maria Cosway. When their affair ended, Jefferson's health again broke down. He set out for the palms and temples of southern Europe, and though he did not know where the therapeutic journey would take him or where it would end, his encounter with the old civilizations of the Mediterranean was transformative. The Greeks and Romans taught him that a man could make productive use of his demons. Jefferson's immersion in the mystic truths of the Old World gave him insights into mysteries of life and art that Enlightenment philosophy had failed to supply. Beran skillfully shows how Jefferson drew on the esoteric lore he encountered to transform anxiety into action. On his return to America, Jefferson entered the most productive period of his life: He created a new political party, was elected president, and doubled the size of the country. His private labors were no less momentous...among them, the artistry of Monticello and the University of Virginia. Jefferson's Demons is an elegantly composed account of the strangeness and originality of one Founder's genius. Michael Knox Beran uncovers the maps Jefferson used to find his way out of dejection and to forge a new democratic culture for America. Here is a Jefferson who, with all his failings, remains one of his country's greatest teachers and prophets.

Religious Reflections on the Human Body

... in Milan in 1975. He published more than ten books in Italian, French, and
English and wrote more than seventy-five major articles. His most recent
publications in English are Eros and Magic in the Renaissance, translated by
Margaret Cook ...

Religious Reflections on the Human Body

"It provides imaginative and thought-provoking... coverage of the ways in which religious thought and practice construct understandings of the human body." -- Journal of Asian Studies "Drawing on a remarkably diverse set of studies discussing the major Western religious traditions (including Islam) and East and South Asian traditions, the book challenges easy theorization of 'the body in religion.'... an excellent source book for college-level comparative religion courses... " -- Bruce Mannheim, University of Michigan "... an important study that... should be of considerable interest to the general student of the history and phenomenology of religions." -- Muslim World Book Review The first cross-cultural and interdisciplinary survey on the relationship between religious practice and ideology and the human body.

The Emotional Power of Music

Couliano, I. P. (1987). Eros and Magic in the Renaissance. Chicago: University of
Chicago Press. Crinò, A. M. (1960). Virtuose di canto e poeti a Roma ea Firenze
nella prima metàdel Seicento. Studi Secenteschi, 1, 175–93. Croce, B. (1992).

The Emotional Power of Music

How can an abstract sequence of sounds so intensely express emotional states? How does music elicit or arouse our emotions? What happens at the physiological and neural level when we listen to music? How do composers and performers practically manage the expressive powers of music? How have societies sought to harness the powers of music for social or therapeutic purposes? In the past ten years, research into the topic of music and emotion has flourished. In addition, the relationship between the two has become of interest to a broad range of disciplines in both the sciences and humanities. The Emotional Power of Music is a multidisciplinary volume exploring the relationship between music and emotion. Bringing together contributions from psychologists, neuroscientists, musicologists, musicians, and philosophers, the volume presents both theoretical perspectives and in-depth explorations of particular musical works, as well as first-hand reports from music performers and composers. In the first section of the book, the authors consider the expression of emotion within music, through both performance and composing. The second section explores how music can stimulate the emotions, considering the psychological and neurological mechanisms that underlie music listening. The third section explores how different societes have sought to manage and manipulate the power of music. The book is valuable for those in the fields of music psychology and music education, as well as philosophy and musicology

The Long Descent

Couliano, Ioan, Eros and Magic in the Renaissance (University of Chicago Press,
1987). Cross, J., and M. Guyer, Social Traps (University of Michigan Press, 1980).
Daly, Herman, Toward a Steady State Economy (William Freeman, 1973).

The Long Descent

SeattleOil.com The Internet writings of John Michael Greer - beyond any doubt the greatest peak oil historian in the English language - have finally made their way into print. Greer fans will recognize many of the book's passages from previous essays, but will be delighted to see them fleshed out here with additional examples and analysis.The Long Descent is one of the most highly anticipated peak oil books of the year, and it lives up to every ounce of hype. Greer is a captivating, brilliantly inventive writer with a deep knowledge of history, an impressive amount of mechanical savvy, a flair for storytelling and a gift for drawing art analogies. His new book presents an astonishing view of our society's past, present and future trajectory--one that is unmatched in its breadth and depth. Reviewed by Frank Kaminski Wired.com The Long Descent is a welcome antidote to the armageddonism that often accompanies peak oil discussions. "The decline of a civilization is rarely anything like so sudden for those who live through it" writes Greer, encouragingly; it's "a much slower and more complex transformation than the sudden catastrophes imagined by many soical critics today." The changes that will follow the decline of world petroleum production are likely to be sweeping and global, Greer concludes, but from the perspective of those who live through them these changes are much more likely to take gradual and local forms. Reviewed by Bruce Sterling Americans are expressing deep concern about US dependence on petroleum, rising energy prices, and the threat of climate change. Unlike the energy crisis of the 1970s, however, there is a lurking fear that now the times are different and the crisis may not easily be resolved. The Long Descent examines the basis of such fear through three core themes: Industrial society is following the same well-worn path that has led other civilizations into decline, a path involving a much slower and more complex transformation than the sudden catastrophes imagined by so many social critics today. The roots of the crisis lie in the cultural stories that shape the way we understand the world. Since problems cannot be solved with the same thinking that created them, these ways of thinking need to be replaced with others better suited to the needs of our time. It is too late for massive programs for top-down change; the change must come from individuals. Hope exists in actions that range from taking up a handicraft or adopting an “obsolete” technology, through planting an organic vegetable garden, taking charge of your own health care or spirituality, and building community. Focusing eloquently on constructive adaptation to massive change, this book will have wide appeal.

Reading Negri

41 (Spring/Summer), 186–92. Couliano, Ioan P. 1987. Eros and Magic in the
Renaissance, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Donagan, A. 1989. Spinoza
in Context, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. DuPlessis, Robert S. and
Howell, ...

Reading Negri

Antonio Negri is the most important Marxist theorist working today. His writings include novel readings of classical philosophers such as Machiavelli, Descartes, and Spinoza, revolutionary reinterpretations of the central texts of Marx, and works of contemporary political analysis. Negri is known in the English-speaking world primarily through Empire, a work he co-authored with Michael Hardt in 2000 that became a surprise academic best-seller. His other writings, which have great depth and breadth, are equally deserving of attention. While most critical accounts of Negri focus only on Empire, this collection of essays presents readers with a fuller picture of Negri’s thought, one that does justice to his ability to use the great texts of the philosophical tradition to illuminate the present. The collection contains essays from scholars representing a broad spectrum of disciplines and interests, and it offers both criticism of and positive commentary on Negri’s work.