Essentials of Modern Literary Tibetan

This book will allow beginners to understand the logic of Tibetan grammar and syntax through graded readings and narrative explanations.

Essentials of Modern Literary Tibetan

"Half of the words are read by implication." This Tibetan saying explains the main difficulty Westerners face in learning to read Tibetan fluently. This book will allow beginners to understand the logic of Tibetan grammar and syntax through graded readings and narrative explanations. The large glossary, which is indexed by page, will serve as an invaluable reference grammar for readers of Tibetan at all levels. The reading course includes a wide range of modern literary styles from literature, history, current affairs, newspapers, and even communist political essays.

Tibetan

Essentials of Modern Literary Tibetan. A Reading Course &. Reference Grammar. Berkeley: University of California Press. Goldstein, Melvyn C, with Gelek Rimpoche & Trinley Dorje. 1987. Tibet Phrasebook. South Yarra, Victoria (Australia): ...

Tibetan

The Tibetan language comprises a wide range of spoken and written varieties whose known history dates from the 7th century AD to the present day. Its speakers inhabit a vast area in Central Asia and the Himalayas extending into seven modern nation states, while its abundant literature includes much of vital importance to the study of Buddhism. After surveying all the known varieties of Tibetan, including their geographical and historical background, this book concentrates on a phonological and grammatical description of the modern spoken Lhasa dialect, the standard spoken variety. The grammatical framework which has been specially devised to describe this variety is then applied to the written varieties of Preclassical and Classical Tibetan, demonstrating the fundamental unity of the language. The writing system is outlined, though all examples and texts are given in roman script and where appropriate, the International Phonetic Alphabet. The volume includes a comprehensive bibliography.

Buddhism in Contemporary Tibet

He has conducted research and written on various aspects of Tibetan popular religion in refugee communities in ... 1939 ) , Nomads of Western Tibet ( California , 1990 ) , Essentials of Modern Literary Tibetan : A Reading Course and ...

Buddhism in Contemporary Tibet

Following the upheavals of the Cultural Revolution, the People's Republic of China gradually permitted the renewal of religious activity. Tibetans, whose traditional religious and cultural institutions had been decimated during the preceding two decades, took advantage of the decisions of 1978 to begin a Buddhist renewal that is one of the most extensive and dramatic examples of religious revitalization in contemporary China. The nature of that revival is the focus of this book.

Identity Ritual and State in Tibetan Buddhism

(1989). A History of Modern Tibet, 1913—1 951: The Demise of the Lamaist State. Berkeley: University of California Press. — (1990). 'The Dragon and the Snow Lion'. In Kane, A.J. (ed.). -— (1991). Essentials of Modern Literary Tibetan.

Identity  Ritual and State in Tibetan Buddhism

This is a major anthropological study of contemporary Tibetan Buddhist monasticism and tantric ritual in the Ladakh region of North-West India and of the role of tantric ritual in the formation and maintenance of traditional forms of state structure and political consciousness in Tibet. Containing detailed descriptions and analyses of monastic ritual, the work builds up a picture of Tibetan tantric traditions as they interact with more localised understandings of bodily identity and territorial cosmology, to produce a substantial re-interpretation of the place of monks as ritual performers and peripheral householders in Ladakh. The work also examines the central and indispensable role of incarnate lamas, such as the Dalai Lama, in the religious life of Tibetan Buddhists.

Compounds and Compounding in Old Tibetan Vol 1

An Eastern Tibetan Dictionary (revised) and A Study of the Eastern Tibetan Language – With Special Reference to the Initial Consonants. ... Essentials of modern literary Tibetan: a reading course and reference grammar.

Compounds and Compounding in Old Tibetan  Vol  1

Old Tibetan documents are the oldest extant monuments of the Tibetan language. Their exploration, although successfully flourishing in the last two decades, has been considerably impeded by often unintelligible and obsolete vocabulary that was bound to the particular cultural and political context of the Tibetan Empire that collapsed in the 840s CE. The present publication aims at clarifying a part of this vocabulary by examining nearly 400 Old Tibetan compounds. In Part I an attempt has been undertaken to define a compound and to provide the first linguistic classification of Old Tibetan compounds. Part II concentrates on a lexicological analysis of the compounds and strives to explain their etymology, word-formation, and usage in Old Tibetan. Contents of Volume 1: Introduction, Indices, References, Part I: Compounding in Old Tibetan, Part II: Old Tibetan Compounds. Lexicological Analysis. Lexemes 1-119

The Sino Tibetan Languages

Goldstein, Melvyn (1975) Tibetan–English Dictionary of Modern Tibetan. Kathmandu: Ratna Pustak Bhandar. Goldstein, Melvyn (1991) Essentials of Modern Literary Tibetan. Berkeley: University of California Press.

The Sino Tibetan Languages

There are more native speakers of Sino-Tibetan languages than of any other language family in the world. Our records of these languages are among the oldest for any human language, and the amount of active research on them has multiplied in the last few decades. Now in its second edition and fully updated to include new research, The Sino-Tibetan Languages includes overview articles on individual languages, with an emphasis on the less commonly described languages, as well as descriptions and comments on the subgroups in which they occur. There are overviews of the whole family on genetic classification and language contact, syntax and morphology, and also on word order typology. There are also more detailed overview articles on the phonology, morphosyntax, and writing system of just the Sinitic side of the family. Supplementing these overviews are articles on Shanghainese, Cantonese and Mandarin dialects. Tibeto-Burman is reviewed by genetic or geographical sub-group, with overview articles on some of the major groups and areas, and there are also detailed descriptions of 41 individual Tibeto-Burman languages, written by world experts in the field. Designed for students and researchers of Asian languages, The Sino-Tibetan Languages is a detailed overview of the field. This book is invaluable to language students, experts requiring concise, but thorough, information on related languages, and researchers working in historical, typological and comparative linguistics.

A Handbook Of Tibetan Culture

Distribution Details 2 tapes to accompany Essentials of Modern Literary Tibetan: a reading course and reference grammar, by M.C. Goldstein Univ. of Calif Press, 1991. Lama/Scholar Prof Melvyn C. Goldstein, Dr Paljor Tsarong, ...

A Handbook Of Tibetan Culture

Over the past nine years the Orient Foundation has compiled a database that brings together information on over 600 Tibetan-related organizations throughtout the world. Compiled under the auspices of HH The Dalai Lama, this book provided comprehensive information about Tibetan Buddhism and culture for the general public including: Museums, teaching centres, retreat centres and publications listed in a country-by-country gazetteer. Background information on the four schools of Tibetan Biddhism Biographies of practising Tibetan teachers The First glossary of Tibetan terms

A Textbook in Classical Tibetan

An Introduction to the Grammar of the Tibetan Language: With the Texts of Situ Sum-tag, Dag-je Sal-wai Melong, and Situi Shal Lung. ... Essentials of Modern Literary Tibetan: A Reading Course and Reference Grammar.

A Textbook in Classical Tibetan

A Textbook in Classical Tibetan is the first comprehensive course book in the Classical Tibetan language written in English. The textbook describes the grammar of pre-16th-century Classical Tibetan works for beginners and students of intermediate level. It is intended to cover the most essential topics that can be mastered within two semesters of an academic class. Classical Tibetan is a written Middle Tibetan language that has been in use in Tibet from the 9th century. Until the early 20th century it served all purposes, from administrative, to medical, to religious. Nowadays Classical Tibetan remains an important part of religious identity and services for communities also outside of cultural Tibet, foremost in India, Nepal, and Bhutan, but also elsewhere, most importantly in Europe, North America and Australia. The main body of the textbook consists of an introduction to the Tibetan script, eighteen lessons, and a reading section. Each lesson elucidates several grammatical topics which are followed by an exercise and a word list. The chapter readings contain four supplementary readings. In addition to the main parts of the textbook, a brief introduction to Tibetic languages provides linguistic context for the language taught in the textbook, whereas the chapter Translations of Exercises and Readings contains translations and explanatory notes to the exercises provided at the end of each lesson, as well as to the readings. A Textbook in Classical Tibetan is essential reading for both undergraduate and graduate students without any knowledge of Classical Tibetan, but also for those who would like to deepen their experience of the language by reading annotated excerpts from well-known pieces of Tibetan literature.

A History of Modern Tibet Volume 4

The fourth volume of Melvyn C. Goldstein's History of Modern Tibet series, In the Eye of the Storm, provides new perspectives on Sino-Tibetan history during the period leading to the Tibetan Uprising of 1959.

A History of Modern Tibet  Volume 4

It is not possible to understand contemporary politics between China and the Dalai Lama without understanding what happened in the 1950s, especially the events that occurred in 1957–59. The fourth volume of Melvyn C. Goldstein's History of Modern Tibet series, In the Eye of the Storm, provides new perspectives on Sino-Tibetan history during the period leading to the Tibetan Uprising of 1959. The volume also reassesses issues that have been widely misunderstood as well as stereotypes and misrepresentations in the popular realm and in academic literature (such as in Mao’s policies on Tibet). Volume 4 draws on important new Chinese government documents, published and unpublished memoirs, new biographies, and a large corpus of in-depth, specially collected political interviews to reexamine the events that produced the March 10th uprising and the demise of Tibet’s famous Buddhist civilization. The result is a heavily documented analysis that presents a nuanced and balanced account of the principal players and their policies during the critical final two years of Sino-Tibetan relations under the Seventeen-Point Agreement of 1951.

Applicative Morphology

Colloquial and Literary Tibetan: Practical usage. Berlin: Self-published. a, b Goldstein, Melvyn C. 1991. Essentials of Modern Literary Tibetan, a reading course and reference grammar. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Applicative Morphology

This book is about recurrent functions of applicative morphology not included in typologically-oriented definitions. Based on substantial cross-linguistic evidence, it challenges received wisdom on applicatives in several ways. First, in many of the surveyed languages, applicatives are the sole means to introduce a non-Actor semantic role into a clause. When there is an alternative way of expression, the applicative counterpart often has no valence-increasing effect on the targeted root. Second, applicative morphology can introduce constituents which are not syntactic objects and/or co-occur with obliques. Third, functions such as conveying aspectual nuances to the predicate (intensity, repetition, habituality) or its arguments (partitive P, highly individuated P), narrow-focusing constituents, and functioning as category-changing devices are attested in geographically distant and genetically unrelated languages. Further, this volume reveals that spatial-related morphology is prone to developing applicative functions in disparate languages and phyla. Finally, several contributions discuss the diachrony of applicative constructions and their (non-syntactic) attested functions, including a case of applicatives-in-the-making.

Minority Language in Today s Global Society

... veloping of Tibetan Language by the Assembly of TAR.” 2002. Tibet Daily News, June 6. Goldstein, Melvyn C., Gelek Rimpoche and Lobsang Phuntshog. 1991. Essentials of Modern Literary Tibetan:A Reading Course and Reference Grammar.

Minority Language in Today s Global Society

"The present volume examines a wide range of issues concerning the status of minority languages around the world with a special focus on the Tibetan language and its dialects. The legal issues surrounding minority language use and policy, as well as strategies for language revitalization, are also addressed"--Back cover.

The Refutation of the Self in Indian Buddhism

Golstein, M.C. Essentials of Modern Literary Tibetan (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1991). Jaschke, H.A. Tibetan Grammar (Delhi: Sri Satguru Publications, 2006). Jaschke, H.A. A Tibetan–English Dictionary (Delhi: Motilal ...

The Refutation of the Self in Indian Buddhism

Since the Buddha did not fully explain the theory of persons that underlies his teaching, in later centuries a number of different interpretations were developed. This book presents the interpretation by the celebrated Indian Buddhist philosopher, Candrakīrti (ca. 570–650 C.E.). Candrakīrti’s fullest statement of the theory is included in his Autocommentary on the Introduction to the Middle Way (Madhyamakāvatārabhasya), which is, along with his Introduction to the Middle Way (Madhyamakāvatāra ), among the central treatises that present the Prāsavgika account of the Madhyamaka (Middle Way) philosophy. In this book, Candrakīrti’s most complete statement of his theory of persons is translated and provided with an introduction and commentary that present a careful philosophical analysis of Candrakīrti’s account of the selflessness of persons. This analysis is both philologically precise and analytically sophisticated. The book is of interest to scholars of Buddhism generally and especially to scholars of Indian Buddhist philosophy.

Linguistics of the Himalayas and Beyond

Goldstein, Melvyn C. 1984 English-Tibetan Dictionary of Modern Tibetan. Dharamsala: Library of Tibetan Works and Archives. 1991 Essentials of Modern Literary Tibetan: A Reading Course and Reference Grammar.

Linguistics of the Himalayas and Beyond

The approximately 250 languages of the Tibeto-Burman family are spoken by 65 million speakers in ten different countries including Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bhutan, Burma and China/Tibet. They are characterized by a fascinating linguistic, historical and cultural diversity. The languages spoken in the Himalayas, on their southern slopes and on the high Tibetan plateau in the north constitute the core of this diversity. Thus, the 21 papers mainly deal with these languages and some go even beyond to the area of the Blue Lake in northern Amdo and to southern Kham within linguistic Tibet. The ten papers dedicated to Tibetan linguistic studies offer approaches to the phonological analysis of Balti, to labial place assimilation, perfective stem renovation and stem alternation connected with verbal valence in Amdo Tibetan, to directional markers in Tokpe Gola in northeastern Nepal, to secondary verb constructions in Kham Tibetan, to narrative texts in Dzongkha, to case-marking patterns in various Tibetan dialects and to language history of Tibetan in general. Other papers deal with deictic patterns and narratives in western Himalayan Kinnauri and with the classification of neighbouring Bunan. With the Tamangic languages of northern Nepal the relationship between vowels and consonants and the development of demonstratives and plural markers are addressed. A further paper investigates the genetic relationship between Dzala and Dakpa, two East Bodish languages, and another one case-marking in Rabha and Manipuri in northeastern India. With the Kiranti languages Sampang, Limbu, Chaurasia and Sunwar in eastern Nepal, questions of accent, pronominally marked determiners, subclassification and language shift are discussed. The impressive selection of languages and linguistic topics dealt with in this book underlines the diversity of the Tibeto-Burman languages in Central and South Asia and highlights their place within present-day linguistic research. The results achieved by leading experts are remarkable in general, and the book is of interest to linguists, anthropologists and geographers.

The Languages and Linguistics of South Asia

Beyer, Stephan V. 1993 The classical Tibetan language. Delhi: Sri Satguru Publications. Denwood, Philip 1999 Tibetan. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: Benjamins. Goldstein, Melvyn 1973 Essentials of Modern Literary Tibetan: A reading course and ...

The Languages and Linguistics of South Asia

With nearly a quarter of the world’s population, members of at least five major language families plus several putative language isolates, South Asia is a fascinating arena for linguistic investigations, whether comparative-historical linguistics, studies of language contact and multilingualism, or general linguistic theory. This volume provides a state-of-the-art survey of linguistic research on the languages of South Asia, with contributions by well-known experts. Focus is both on what has been accomplished so far and on what remains unresolved or controversial and hence offers challenges for future research. In addition to covering the languages, their histories, and their genetic classification, as well as phonetics/phonology, morphology, syntax, and sociolinguistics, the volume provides special coverage of contact and convergence, indigenous South Asian grammatical traditions, applications of modern technology to South Asian languages, and South Asian writing systems. An appendix offers a classified listing of major sources and resources, both digital/online and printed.

The World s Writing Systems

A Grammar ofthe Tibetan Language in English. Calcutta: Asiatic Society of Bengal. Repr. New York: Altai, 1969; New Delhi: Nawang Topgyal, I983. Goldstein, Melvyn. 1991. Essentials of Modern Literary Tibetan. Berkeley and Los Angeles: ...

The World s Writing Systems

Documents the history of writing to the present day. Covers every script officially used throughout the world.

Epistemic modality in spoken standard Tibetian epistemic verbal endings and copulas

Bodkyi yul-skad rnam-bshad, Zangyu fangyangailun [An Introduction to Tibetan Dialects]. Beijing: Minorities Publishing House. GOLDSTEIN, M. C. et al. 1991. Essentials of Modern Literary Tibetan: ...

Epistemic modality in spoken standard Tibetian  epistemic verbal endings and copulas

This monograph deals with the grammatical expression of epistemic modalities in standard spoken Tibetan. It describes the system of various types of epistemic verbal endings and epistemic copulas frequently employed in the spoken language, as well as those that occur less frequently. These verbal endings are analyzed from the semantic, syntactic and pragmatic viewpoints, and illustrated by examples.

Evidential in Amdo Tibetan Gesang, Jumian t§#gl . 1964. Zangyu fangyan gaiyao M M 15 m M ^ (Essentials of Tibetan dialectology). Beijing: Central Institute of Nationality Studies. Goldstein, Melvyn C. 1991. Essentials of Modern Literary ...


The Oxford Handbook of Evidentiality

Essentials of modern literary Tibetan: a reading course and reference grammar. Also published 1991: Berkeley/Los Angeles: University of California Press. Goldstein, Melvyn and Nawang Nornang. 1970. Modern spoken Tibetan: Lhasa dialect.

The Oxford Handbook of Evidentiality

This volume offers a thorough, systematic, and crosslinguistic account of evidentiality, the linguistic encoding of the source of information on which a statement is based. In some languages, the speaker always has to specify this source - for example whether they saw the event, heard it, inferred it based on visual evidence or common sense, or was told about it by someone else. While not all languages have obligatory marking of this type, every language has ways of referring to information source and associated epistemological meanings. The continuum of epistemological expressions covers a range of devices from the lexical means in familiar European languages and in many languages of Aboriginal Australia to the highly grammaticalized systems in Amazonia or North America. In this handbook, experts from a variety of fields explore topics such as the relationship between evidentials and epistemic modality, contact-induced changes in evidential systems, the acquisition of evidentials, and formal semantic theories of evidentiality. The book also contains detailed case studies of evidentiality in language families across the world, including Algonquian, Korean, Nakh-Dagestanian, Nambikwara, Turkic, Uralic, and Uto-Aztecan.

A Grammar of Kurt p

Essentials of Modern Literary Tibetan: A Reading Course and Reference Grammar. Berkeley: University of California Press. ... In The Sino-Tibetan Languages, edited by Graham Thurgood and Randy J. LaPolla, 602–620. London: Routledge.

A Grammar of Kurt  p

A grammar of Kurtöp presents the phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics of Kurtöp, a Tibeto-Burman language of northeastern Bhutan. When possible, data are presented in a comparative light, lending insight into the development of phenomena such as tonogenesis and nominalizations.

Space and Quantification in Languages of China

Essentials of modern literary Tibetan. Berkeley: University of California Press. Haugen, Einar. 1983. The implementation of corpus planning: Theory and practice. In Progress in language planning. International perspectives, ed.

Space and Quantification in Languages of China

This volume provides general linguists with new data and analysis on languages spoken in China regarding various aspects of space and quantification, using different approaches. Contributions by researchers from Mainland China, Hong Kong, Japan, Europe, the United States and Australia offer insights on aspects of language ranging from phonology and morphology to syntax and semantics, while the approaches vary from formal, historical, areal, typological, and cognitive linguistics to second language acquisition. After separate volumes on space and quantification in languages of China, the studies in this volume combine space and quantification to allow readers a view of the intersection of the two topics. Each article contributes to general linguistic knowledge while discussing a particular aspect of space or quantification in a particular language/dialect, offering new data and analysis from languages that are spoken in the same geographical area, and that belong to various language families that exist and evolve in close contact with one another.