Ethics and the Archaeology of Violence

This volume examines the distinctive and highly problematic ethical questions surrounding conflict archaeology.

Ethics and the Archaeology of Violence

This volume examines the distinctive and highly problematic ethical questions surrounding conflict archaeology. By bringing together sophisticated analyses and pertinent case studies from around the world it aims to address the problems facing archaeologists working in areas of violent conflict, past and present. Of all the contentious issues within archaeology and heritage, the study of conflict and work within conflict zones are undoubtedly the most highly charged and hotly debated, both within and outside the discipline. Ranging across the conflict zones of the world past and present, this book attempts to raise the level of these often fractious debates by locating them within ethical frameworks. The issues and debates in this book range across a range of ethical models, including deontological, teleological and virtue ethics. The chapters address real-world ethical conundrums that confront archaeologists in a diversity of countries, including Israel/Palestine, Iran, Uruguay, Argentina, Rwanda, Germany and Spain. They all have in common recent, traumatic experiences of war and dictatorship. The chapters provide carefully argued, thought-provoking analyses and examples that will be of real practical use to archaeologists in formulating and addressing ethical dilemmas in a confident and constructive manner.

Ethics and the Archaeology of Violence

This volume examines the distinctive and highly problematic ethical questions surrounding conflict archaeology.

Ethics and the Archaeology of Violence


Bioarchaeology of Climate Change and Violence

The goal of this monograph is to emphasize with empirical data the complexity of the relationship between climate change and violence.

Bioarchaeology of Climate Change and Violence

The goal of this monograph is to emphasize with empirical data the complexity of the relationship between climate change and violence. Bioarchaeology is the integration of human skeletal remains from ancient societies with the cultural and environmental context. Information on mortality, disease, diet and other factors provide important data to examine long chronologies of human existence, particularly during periods of droughts and life-threatening climate changes. Case studies are used to reconstruct the responses and short and long-term adaptations made by groups before, during and after dramatic changes in weather and climate. Interpersonal and group violence is also analyzed. The authors find that while in some cases there is an increase in trauma and violence, in other cases there is not. Human groups are capable of avoiding violent altercations and increasing broad networks of cooperation that help to mitigate the effects of climate change. A case study from the U.S. Southwest is provided that shows the variable and surprising ways that ancient farmers in the past dealt with long term droughts.

Bioarchaeology of Climate Change and Violence

The goal of this monograph is to emphasize with empirical data the complexity of the relationship between climate change and violence.

Bioarchaeology of Climate Change and Violence

The goal of this monograph is to emphasize with empirical data the complexity of the relationship between climate change and violence. Bioarchaeology is the integration of human skeletal remains from ancient societies with the cultural and environmental context. Information on mortality, disease, diet and other factors provide important data to examine long chronologies of human existence, particularly during periods of droughts and life-threatening climate changes. Case studies are used to reconstruct the responses and short and long-term adaptations made by groups before, during and after dramatic changes in weather and climate. Interpersonal and group violence is also analyzed. The authors find that while in some cases there is an increase in trauma and violence, in other cases there is not. Human groups are capable of avoiding violent altercations and increasing broad networks of cooperation that help to mitigate the effects of climate change. A case study from the U.S. Southwest is provided that shows the variable and surprising ways that ancient farmers in the past dealt with long term droughts.

The Archaeology of the Spanish Civil War

By looking at these things, another story of the war unfolds, one that pays more attention to intimate experiences and anonymous individuals.

The Archaeology of the Spanish Civil War

The Archaeology of the Spanish Civil War offers the first comprehensive account of the Spanish Civil War from an archaeological perspective, providing an alternative narrative on one of the most important conflicts of the twentieth century, widely seen as a prelude to the Second World War. Between 1936 and 1939, totalitarianism and democracy, fascism and revolution clashed in Spain, while the latest military technologies were being tested, including strategic bombing and combined arms warfare, and violence against civilians became widespread. Archaeology, however, complicates the picture as it brings forgotten actors into play: obsolete weapons, vernacular architecture, ancient structures (from Iron Age hillforts to sheepfolds), peasant traditions, and makeshift arms. By looking at these things, another story of the war unfolds, one that pays more attention to intimate experiences and anonymous individuals. Archaeology also helps to clarify battles, which were often chaotic and only partially documented, and to understand better the patterns of political violence, whose effects were literally buried for over 70 years. The narrative starts with the coup against the Second Spanish Republic on 18 July 1936, follows the massacres and battles that marked the path of the war, and ends in the early 1950s, when the last forced labor camps were closed and the anti-Francoist guerrillas suppressed. The book draws on 20 years of research to bring together perspectives from battlefield archaeology, archaeologies of internment, and forensics. It will be of interest to anybody interested in historical and contemporary archaeology, human rights violations, modern military history, and negative heritage.

Handbook of Forensic Anthropology and Archaeology

What is Ethics? www.ethicsquality.com/about.htlm, accessed February 12, 2002.
... Cognitive dissidence and the military archaeology complex, in A. González-
Ruibal & G. Moshenska (Eds.), Ethics, Archaeology and Violence: 199–213.

Handbook of Forensic Anthropology and Archaeology

With contributions from 70 experienced practitioners from around the world, this second edition of the authoritative Handbook of Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology provides a solid foundation in both the practical and ethical components of forensic work. The book weaves together the discipline’s historical development; current field methods for analyzing crime, natural disasters, and human atrocities; an array of laboratory techniques; key case studies involving legal, professional, and ethical issues; and ideas about the future of forensic work--all from a global perspective. This fully revised second edition expands the geographic representation of the first edition by including chapters from practitioners in South Africa and Colombia, and adds exciting new chapters on the International Commission on Missing Persons and on forensic work being done to identify victims of the Battle of Fromelles during World War I. The Handbook of Forensic Anthropology and Archaeology provides an updated perspective of the disciplines of forensic archaeology and anthropology.

The Ethics of Anthropology and Amerindian Research

Collectively, the contributions in this volume, which extend across the disciplines of archaeology, anthropology, ethnohistory, ethnic studies, philosophy, and medicine, argue that the non-reporting of environmental mismanagement and ...

The Ethics of Anthropology and Amerindian Research

The decision to publish scholarly findings bearing on the question of Amerindian environmental degradation, warfare, and/or violence is one that weighs heavily on anthropologists. This burden stems from the fact that documentation of this may render descendant communities vulnerable to a host of predatory agendas and hostile modern forces. Consequently, some anthropologists and community advocates alike argue that such culturally and socially sensitive, and thereby, politically volatile information regarding Amerindian-induced environmental degradation and warfare should not be reported. This admonition presents a conundrum for anthropologists and other social scientists employed in the academy or who work at the behest of tribal entities. This work documents the various ethical dilemmas that confront anthropologists, and researchers in general, when investigating Amerindian communities. The contributions to this volume explore the ramifications of reporting--and, specifically,--of non-reporting instances of environmental degradation and warfare among Amerindians. Collectively, the contributions in this volume, which extend across the disciplines of archaeology, anthropology, ethnohistory, ethnic studies, philosophy, and medicine, argue that the non-reporting of environmental mismanagement and violence in Amerindian communities generally harms not only the field of anthropology but the Amerindian populations themselves.

Archeology of Violence

Furthermore , the path can be traveled in the opposite direction : a warlike society
could very well cease to be one , if a change in the tribal ethic or in the
sociopolitical environment alters the taste for war or limits its field of application .

Archeology of Violence

The posthumous publication in French of Archeology of Violence in 1980 gathered together Clastres's final groundbreaking essays and the opening chapters of the book he had begun before his death in 1977. Elaborating upon the conclusions of such earlier works as Society Against the State, Clastres turns around the analysis of power among South American Indians and rehabilitates violence as an affirmative act meant to protect the integrity of their societies and presents us with a generalogy of power in a native state. For him, tribal societies are not Rousseauist in essence; to the contrary, they practice systematic violence in order to prevent the rise in their midst of this "cold monster": the state. Only by waging war with other tribes can they maintain the dispersion and autonomy of each group. In the same way, tribal chiefs are not all-powerful; to the contrary, they are rendered weak in order to remain dependent on the community. In a series of groundbreaking essays, Clastres turns around the analysis of power among South American Indians and rehabilitates violence as an affirmative act meant to protect the integrity of their societies. These "savages" are shrewd political minds who resist in advance any attempt at "globalization".

The Ethics of Anthropology and Amerindian Research

Collectively, the contributions in this volume, which extend across the disciplines of archaeology, anthropology, ethnohistory, ethnic studies, philosophy, and medicine, argue that the non-reporting of environmental mismanagement and ...

The Ethics of Anthropology and Amerindian Research

The decision to publish scholarly findings bearing on the question of Amerindian environmental degradation, warfare, and/or violence is one that weighs heavily on anthropologists. This burden stems from the fact that documentation of this may render descendant communities vulnerable to a host of predatory agendas and hostile modern forces. Consequently, some anthropologists and community advocates alike argue that such culturally and socially sensitive, and thereby, politically volatile information regarding Amerindian-induced environmental degradation and warfare should not be reported. This admonition presents a conundrum for anthropologists and other social scientists employed in the academy or who work at the behest of tribal entities. This work documents the various ethical dilemmas that confront anthropologists, and researchers in general, when investigating Amerindian communities. The contributions to this volume explore the ramifications of reporting--and, specifically,--of non-reporting instances of environmental degradation and warfare among Amerindians. Collectively, the contributions in this volume, which extend across the disciplines of archaeology, anthropology, ethnohistory, ethnic studies, philosophy, and medicine, argue that the non-reporting of environmental mismanagement and violence in Amerindian communities generally harms not only the field of anthropology but the Amerindian populations themselves.

Ethics and Anthropology

present and past through scientific discourses such as cartography , geography ,
and archaeology . ... touring “ ancient Egypt " and the constitution of the “ heritage
industry ” in Egypt are factors indelibly intertwined with these acts of violence .

Ethics and Anthropology

Since the 1970s, anthropologists have moved into diverse workplaces, including private and public settings, that raise new issues for anthropology as a discipline as well as for the discourse on science more generally. In the context of increasing globalization, the articulation of new ethical dilemmas around such issues as technology, indigenous knowledge and rights, government regulation and bioethics among others, can and do inform and shape scientific public policy. The authors in this volume work in traditional research centres and universities, as well as in private and public sectors, and across specialties from medical anthropology and social medicine to archaeology and cyberspace. They explore the dimensions of an ethical anthropology in today's world, and the unique contribution of anthropology to the sciences.

The Ethics of Violence

Ethics in the Lacanian sense has to go beyond calculation or the search for
recognition . Brother and sister , again , constitute a ... Lacan , op . cit . , 1992
p281 . Heidegger ' s existential archeology , Lacan provides us a 124 New
FORMATIONS.

The Ethics of Violence

This issue examines the concept of violence. It argues that ethics are deeply imbued with violence, and explores the ambiguous relations between them. The argument is that Kantian ethics are based on the violent split Kant makes between the physical - which includes the body - and spiritual worlds. This is why absolute ethical stances - for example that of Antigone, or of those who renounce their families in the name of a higher cause - are often perceived of as inhuman. Some contributors then go on to draw parallels between Kantian ethics and those of Sade, while others discuss the contextualisation of violence - the same act, body piercing, can be viewed as savage ritual or urban chic.

A History of Egyptian Archaeology

up violence . I have done violence to no man . I have not committed theft . I have
not slain man or woman . I have not made ... had is a moot question but the
requirements for entrance into the realm of Osiris did produce some ethical
standards .

A History of Egyptian Archaeology


Journal of Environment and Culture

The Ethics of Archaeology : Philosophical Perspectives on Archaeological
Practice . Scarre ... Modern Ghana News : http // www.modernghana.com/news/
233465/1/ Pollock S 2008 Archaeology as a means for Peace or a source of
violence ?

Journal of Environment and Culture


The South African Archaeological Bulletin

Working Together : Native American and Archaeologists . Washington ...
Situational ethics and engaged practice : the case of archaeology in Africa . In :
Meskell ... Sites of violence : terrorism , tourism and heritage in the
archaeological present ...

The South African Archaeological Bulletin


Warfare and Society

If it was not violence per se, it most certainly was a transformation of power and a
violent dislocation of political agency. Anthony Giddens' ... Paper presented at the
Conference 'Towards a More Ethical Mayanist Archaeology'. University of ...

Warfare and Society

This book deals with the interrelationship between society and war seen through the analytical eyes of anthropologists and archaeologists. War is a ghastly thing, which unfortunately thrives almost everywhere in the world today. We need, therefore, to have a better understanding of what war does to people and their societies. War produces change, and archaeologists and anthropologists are analytically equipped to pinpoint its direction, patterning, scale and content. The perspective -- and filter -- of time provides one important tool, while context and comparison provide other tools. Looking at the history of war studies, war is quite often perceived of and treated as something set aside from other practices; almost personified. However, the results published in this book allow us to say that it is never autonomous and self-regulating. War always forms part of something else. Numerous questions arise, and at least some answers -- often tentative and multifaceted -- are provided in the twenty-eight studies included in the book. They certainly add to an ongoing debate, hopefully qualifying it as well.

Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics S Z Index

Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics  S Z  Index

Applied ethics, a subdiscipline of philosophy, lends itself to an encyclopedia format because of the many industries and intellectual fields that it encompasses. The Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics is based on twelve major categories, such as Biomedical Ethics and Environmental Ethics. Religious traditions that embody normative beliefs, as well as classical theories of ethics, are explored in a non-judgmental manner. Each of the twelve categories is divided into discrete areas that are covered by 5,000-6,000 word articles. Each of the 281 articles begins with a definition of the subject and includes a table of contents, glossary of key terms, and bibliography. Second- and third- level headings, boxes, sidebars, and the like emphasize the reference-oriented nature of the material. The four volumes are arranged in an A-Z format, with a complete subject index at the end of the last volume. Articles are written by international experts, arranged alphabetically by title, not by subject, and cross-referenced so the reader can locate relevant information in other articles.

Sexual Violence in German Culture

and of values , morals , and ethics . They influence our understanding ... 17 Since
it cannot be the objective of this dissertation to write a complete " History of
Sexual Violence , " I follow Foucault ' s " archaeological " approach . By
delineating a ...

Sexual Violence in German Culture

The project examines fictional and non-fictional texts on sexual violence in German culture between 1774 and 1994. Specifically, it juxtaposes historical and contemporary Penal Codes and statistical records from Germany, theoretical scholarship and applie

Archaeological Review from Cambridge

North American Indigenous Warfare and Ritual Violence Edited by Richard J.
Chacon and Rubén G. Mendoza 2007. ... with a further chapter on ethics ,
discussing the rise of revisionism and the political implications of Archaeological
Review ...

Archaeological Review from Cambridge


The Ethics of Writing

136 The proper name upholds the route to the possibility of a “ pre - ethical
violence ” ! ... As always , this archeology is also a teleology and an eschatology ;
the dream of a full and immediate presence closing history , the transparence
and ...

The Ethics of Writing

This is a treatise on Jacques Derrida's educational texts - those writings concerned with the ethics and politics of the historico-philosophical structures constituting the scene of teaching. It addresses the importance of deconstruction.

Violence and Bloodshed in Nigerian Universities

This knowledge is guided by its ethics of truth , honesty and objectivity . ...
European Studies , Linguistics and African Languages , Communication and
Language Arts , Philosophy , Theatre Arts , Archaeology and Anthropology ,
Education ...

Violence and Bloodshed in Nigerian Universities