Ethics Meaningfulness and Mutuality

In so doing, the book advances our understanding of the theory and practice of ethical organising.

Ethics  Meaningfulness  and Mutuality

There is an urgent need to understand how private and public organisations can play a role in promoting human values such as fairness, dignity, respect and care. Globalisation, technological advance and climate change are changing work, organisations and systems in ways which foster inequality, alienation and collective risk. Against this backdrop, organisations are being urged to make their contribution to the common good, take account of the interests of multiple stakeholders, and respond ethically as well as efficiently to complex challenges which transcend traditional organisational and state boundaries. Ethics, Meaningfulness, and Mutuality poses critical questions related to organisational design by challenging limits to current thinking, such as the neglect by political philosophers of markets, firms and stakeholders, or by organisational theorists of business ethics. In so doing, the book advances our understanding of the theory and practice of ethical organising. Specifically, meaningfulness and mutuality will be used to yield values and principles for a philosophy of ethical organising which includes an account of human values in morally desirable collective action, and examines the relationship of collective action to the contested concept of shared value creation. Within a philosophy of ethical organising, mutuality permits an examination of the unavoidable relational nature of collective action, whereas meaningfulness addresses fundamental human concerns for significance and leading a life we have reason to value. By addressing our status as relational beings with human needs for meaning, a philosophy of ethical organising brings critical thinking to the creation of morally informed organisational practices which are not only instrumentally beneficial for addressing wicked problems, but are normatively desirable for human flourishing.

Ethics Meaningfulness and Mutuality

In another thread of meaning, mutuality derives from mutare, mutuo, and mutates, associated with 'modify', 'move', ... with unexpected novelties, some monstrous, some generative, and therefore must be subject to moral judgement.

Ethics  Meaningfulness  and Mutuality

There is an urgent need to understand how private and public organisations can play a role in promoting human values such as fairness, dignity, respect and care. Globalisation, technological advance and climate change are changing work, organisations and systems in ways which foster inequality, alienation and collective risk. Against this backdrop, organisations are being urged to make their contribution to the common good, take account of the interests of multiple stakeholders, and respond ethically as well as efficiently to complex challenges which transcend traditional organisational and state boundaries. Ethics, Meaningfulness, and Mutuality poses critical questions related to organisational design by challenging limits to current thinking, such as the neglect by political philosophers of markets, firms and stakeholders, or by organisational theorists of business ethics. In so doing, the book advances our understanding of the theory and practice of ethical organising. Specifically, meaningfulness and mutuality will be used to yield values and principles for a philosophy of ethical organising which includes an account of human values in morally desirable collective action, and examines the relationship of collective action to the contested concept of shared value creation. Within a philosophy of ethical organising, mutuality permits an examination of the unavoidable relational nature of collective action, whereas meaningfulness addresses fundamental human concerns for significance and leading a life we have reason to value. By addressing our status as relational beings with human needs for meaning, a philosophy of ethical organising brings critical thinking to the creation of morally informed organisational practices which are not only instrumentally beneficial for addressing wicked problems, but are normatively desirable for human flourishing.

Meaningful Work and Workplace Democracy

This book is a timely revival of the social and political importance of meaningful work, which explores a philosophy of work based upon the value of meaningfulness and argues for the institution of a new politics of meaningfulness.

Meaningful Work and Workplace Democracy

This book is a timely revival of the social and political importance of meaningful work, which explores a philosophy of work based upon the value of meaningfulness and argues for the institution of a new politics of meaningfulness.

The Politics and Ethics of Contemporary Work

Schnell, T. (2011) 'Individual Differences in Meaning-Making: Considering the Variety of Sources of Meaning, Their Density and Diversity', ... Yeoman, R. (2020) Ethics, Meaningfulness, and Mutuality (New York: Routledge).

The Politics and Ethics of Contemporary Work

Bringing together leading international scholars within the fields of social and political theory and philosophy, this book explores how we should understand work and its role(s) in our lives and wider society. What challenges are posed by work in our changing economy and the new economic forms that are beginning to emerge, and how can we best address these challenges? In what ways do patterns of working, as well as work technologies, shape people’s lives within and outside work, in particular their life opportunities and their social and natural environment? How might we organize—or seek to reorganize—workplaces so that the experience of work better reflects our shared ethical ideals and normative principles? This volume examines these vital questions in a comprehensive and systematic manner in order to provide much needed theoretical insight and practical guidance in reflecting on the nature, problems, and possibilities of work currently. This book will be of interest to undergraduate and postgraduate students and established academics in the areas of contemporary political theory and philosophy, social theory, legal philosophy, labour studies, the sociology of work, practical ethics, critical theory, and political activism.

The Oxford Handbook of Meaningful Work

She writes on the importance of meaningful work and researches the ethics and practice of mutuality in co-owned and conventionally owned enterprises. Her book, Meaningful Work and Workplace Democracy: A Philosophy of Work and a Politics ...

The Oxford Handbook of Meaningful Work

The Oxford Handbook of Meaningful Work examines the concept, practices and effects of meaningful work in organizations and beyond. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this volume reflects diverse scholarly contributions to understanding meaningful work from philosophy, political theory, psychology, sociology, organizational studies, and economics. In philosophy and political theory, treatments of meaningful work have been influenced by debates concerning the tensions between work as unavoidable and necessary, and work as a source of self-realization and human flourishing. This tension has come into renewed focus as work is reshaped by technology, globalization, and new forms of organization. In management studies, much empirical work has focused on meaningful work from the perspective of positive psychology, but more recent research has considered meaningful work as a complex phenomenon, socially constructed from interactive processes between individuals, and between individuals, organizations, and society. This Handbook examines meaningful work in the context of moral and pragmatic concerns such as human flourishing, dignity, alienation, freedom, and organizational ethics. The collection illuminates the relationship of meaningful work to organizational constructs of identity, belonging, callings, self-transcendence, culture, and occupations. Representing some of the most up to date academic research, the editors aim to inspire and equip researchers by identifying new directions and methods with which to deepen scholarly inquiry into a topic of growing importance.

Work Appropriation and Social Inequality

Conceptualising Meaningful Work as a Fundamental Human Need. Journal of Business Ethics. 125(2), 235–251. Yeoman, R. (2020a). Ethics, Meaningfulness, and Mutuality. Abingdon and New York: Routledge Studies in Business Ethics.

Work Appropriation and Social Inequality

This volume is a collection of subject-oriented studies on paid work. Each chapter refers to the social structures that form conditions for peoples’ working contexts and interprets workers’ and employees’ narrations on work. Work appropriation—a process of formation of subjectivity, in which workers and employees relate to the social status of their occupations and the use-value of their work in actively dealing with the work’s content and conditions—serves as a comprehensive concept for each varying subject-oriented approach in the volume. ‘Work Appropriation and Social Inequality’ focuses on social inequality, understood as the distribution of life chances that privilege some and discriminate others and reveals the unequal conditions for, and outcomes of, work appropriation. By analyzing work appropriation, it uses a broader concept than that of ‘meaning of work’ or ‘meaningful work’ as it includes the practice and processes of working. The volume’s subject-oriented approach to work differs from the stream ‘subjectivation’ in going beyond individuals’ desires for self-realization in work and to companies’ requirements of accessing emotional and personal dimensions of their workforce. The volume contains three parts: the first lays out basic approaches to work appropriation and social inequality, the second analyses current threats to work appropriation in the UK and Germany, and the third consists of a philosophical outlook on work in the Anthropocene. The book’s impact lies in pushing forward the debate on how work appropriations are linked to unequal social structures. It will therefore appeal to social scientists interested in social inequality, sociology of work and organization, as well as students and teachers at the undergraduate and graduate level in the areas of social sciences.

Public Values for Cities and City Policy

Does meaning-making help during organizational change? ... Meaningful work and workplace democracy: A philosophy of work and a politics of meaningfulness. Palgrave Macmillan. ... Ethics, meaningfulness, and mutuality. Routledge.

Public Values for Cities and City Policy


Psychology of Ethics

... sublime , 187 Moral turpitude , 189 Living cost , 193 Morality , 19 , 23 , 116 , 131 , 166 Living is lifesaving , 144 Morality , medical , 140 Localization , xv , 117 Motivation , 165 Localization , of meaning , 90 Mutuality ...

Psychology of Ethics


Identity Formation Agency and Culture

Theseunderstandings give meaning to their willingness tobe responsiblebut mustalsoground their motivationtoadopt an ethical stanceon interactive mutuality. Any other orientation taken to themselves or others would, for them, only make ...

Identity  Formation  Agency  and Culture

The goal of Identity, Formation, Agency, and Culture is to lay the basis of a theory with which to better understand the difficulties and complexities of identity formation. It provides an extensive understanding of identity formation as it relates to human striving (agency) and social organization (culture). James E. Côté and Charles G. Levine have compiled state-of-the-art psychological and sociological theory and research into a concise synthesis. This volume utilizes a vast, interdisciplinary literature in a reader-friendly style. Playing the role of narrators, the authors take readers through the most important theories and studies of self and identity, focusing on pragmatic issues of identity formation--those things that matter most in people's lives. Identity, Formation, Agency, and Culture is intended for identity-related researchers in the behavioral and social sciences, as well as clinicians, counselors, and social workers dealing with identity-related disorders. It also serves as a main or supplemental text in advanced courses on identity, identity and human development, social development, moral development, personality, the sociology of identity, and the individual and society taught in departments of psychology, sociology, human development, and family studies.

Inherent and Instrumental Values

The third element in Buber's notion of Presence is a discovery that meaning revealed in the relationship of mutual action belongs to this world of ours. Meaning, in Buber's ethics, is not transcendental; it may depend on God, ...

Inherent and Instrumental Values

The essays in this book offer an in-depth exploration of value theory. Portions examine the theoretical foundations of values and valuation exploring the rational groundwork for judgments. Other aspects, appealing to value distinctions of inherent, intrinsic, and instrumental, bring to light matters of aesthetic, social political, ethical, and ontological issues.

Ethics and International Curriculum Work

We could, in our own case, refer instead to an 'immanent ethics', meaning both a set of practices and its theoretical underpinnings. 9. See Keller (2011) for a parallel ... The ethics of the concern of the Mutuality xxxii □ or Monopoly.

Ethics and International Curriculum Work

The widely cited, though highly contested, idea that “the world is flat” (Friedman, 2004) carries with it a call for education to provide a leveling effect across continents and cultures Students in Skokie or in Skopje, as the theory goes, are expected to experience a school curriculum that shares certain common elements, goals, and purposes. Such a globalized view is not, however, without its complications. This book addresses some of the issues that arise when the transmigration of educational ideas occurs, with a particular eye toward the ethical dilemmas that curriculum workers face in international contexts. The authors who have contributed to this volume explore, through case examples and critical reflection, what happens when ideas that are drawn from one set of cultural norms and experiences is introduced into other cultural contexts. In many cases these are the stories of “donors” and “hosts,” of structured inequities of power and influence, of disparities in material resources, and, as expressed in one of the cases, the dynamics of the “colonizer” and the “colonized.” A recurrent theme concerns the challenges faced by educators working internationally to reconcile their own ethical predispositions toward equity and cultural responsiveness with certain tacit assumptions about the appropriateness or value of curriculum practices brought from the “developed” world for teachers and students in the “developing” world. How these dilemmas are navigated forms the content of this collection of reports from the field written by those who engage in this complex and important work. While the content of this volume is situated at the intersection between the field of curriculum studies and comparative education, it is fundamentally a book about curriculum. Most of the authors come from various disciplinary backgrounds with specializations in curriculum development in content areas such as social studies, geography, or mathematics. As “outsiders looking in” on the field of international education and with thoughtful reflections grounded in practice, the authors provide a new set of insights into the challenges of international curriculum work. Finally, since many of the questions raised by the work included here are ethical in nature, the book begins and ends with analyses that link the practical realities presented in the cases with contemporary philosophical thought. This, then, can be seen as the primary contribution of the book to the educational literature as it offers a careful and well-articulated synthesis of theory and practice in the field of international curriculum work. This publication would make an important contribution to courses in curriculum theory and practice, comparative and international education, and international development outside of the field of education.

Reassessing the Gift Relationship

This thesis is based on a critical re-appraisal of Richard Titmuss' classic formulation of gift relationships, which has long been a point of reference for thinking about blood donation in Britain.

Reassessing the Gift Relationship

This thesis is based on a critical re-appraisal of Richard Titmuss' classic formulation of gift relationships, which has long been a point of reference for thinking about blood donation in Britain. It argues that Titmuss' interest in the intersections of social systems and health care, together with his concern with mutuality, has been lost in the characterisation of blood donation as a uniquely altruistic activity. This argument is applied to some key assumptions about blood donation in Britain in the thesis, which considers their historical and political contours, and interrogates them in the light of the development of large biobanks which require blood samples for genetic research. In examining the revival of this mobilising metaphor for genetic biobanks, interview data from UK National Blood Service donors and with others donating blood for a genetic research project is generated and analysed. This reveals that the notion of gifted blood has considerable acuity in summoning up social allegiances based on a sense of community. It is suggested however that mutuality (not one-dimensional altruism) is the model implied by these participants stance to blood donation or participation in research. This resonates with the re-evaluation of Titmuss' work, in which debates about practical mutual provision and social insurance are more prominent than is generally acknowledged. Biobanks, as with blood banks of a traditional kind, are bound up with an assertion of common interests. The tacit use of notions of gifted blood and solidarity in the context of contemporary policies on biobanks are revealed as problematic. The thesis concludes by underlining the importance of having an explicit political debate about the UK Biobank, and of developing mechanisms to negotiate and protect the collective interests to which it refers.

Good News

Clearly and accessibly written, with numerous real-life examples and a solid basis in ethical theory, Good News will be of interest to journalist, editors, and professionals in media management, as well as to professors and students of ...

Good News

Mass media ethics and the classical liberal ideal of the autonomous individual are historically linked and professionally dominant--yet the authors of this work feel this is intrinsically flawed. They show how recent research in philosophy and social science--together with a longer tradition in theological inquiry--insist that community, mutuality, and relationship are fundamental to a full concept of personhood. The authors argue that "persons-in-community" provides a more defensible grounding for journalists' professional moral decision-making in crucial areas such as truthtelling, privacy, organizational culture, and balanced coverage. With numerous examples drawn from life as well as from theory, this book will interest journalists, editors, and professionals in media management as well as students and scholars of media ethics, reporting, and media law.

Ethics A Pluralistic Approach to Moral Theory

The meaningfulness and moral significance of human suffering ... is “a Jihad in the name of a hundred narrowly conceived faiths against every kind of interdependence, every kind of artificial social cooperation and civic mutuality.

Ethics  A Pluralistic Approach to Moral Theory

ETHICS: A PLURALISTIC APPROACH TO MORAL THEORY, FIFTH EDITION provides a comprehensive yet clear introduction to the main traditions in ethical thought, including virtue ethics, utilitarianism, and deontology. Additionally, the book presents a conceptual framework of ethical pluralism to help students understand the relationship among various theories. Lawrence Hinman, one of today's most respected and accomplished educators in ethics and philosophy education, presents a text that gives students plentiful opportunities to explore ethical theory and their own responses to them, using fascinating features such as the Ethical Inventory sections that appear at the beginning and the end of the text. End-of-chapter discussion questions, and the use of current issues and movies help students retain what they've learned and truly comprehend the subject matter. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Teaching Business Ethics for Effective Learning

The instructor must encourage individuals to give and to get so that they develop their own meaningful ... To provide ambiguity , it is necessary to create an environment of mutuality ( two - sided exchange ) in which learning is self ...

Teaching Business Ethics for Effective Learning

The key to teaching business ethics successfully, says Sims, is to start with clear goals and a sensible expectation of outcomes, and with a true knowledge and appreciation of how people actually learn. Proceeding with the conviction that open communications between teacher and student before, during, and after the teaching experience is vital, Sims identifies key teaching processes, gives practical advice on designing and planning the curriculum, and offers guidance on how to develop a climate conducive to effective learning. He also emphasizes learning styles and experiential learning theory as cornerstones of teaching business ethics, an approach unlike any in the literature. An important guide for those who are new to teaching this essential subject, Sims' book will also help more experienced teachers who wonder why their own methods do not always work, or do not work as well as they think they should.

Good News

Mass media ethics and the classical liberal ideal of the autonomous individual are historically linked and professionally dominant--yet the authors of this work feel this is intrinsically flawed.

Good News

Mass media ethics and the classical liberal ideal of the autonomous individual are historically linked and professionally dominant--yet the authors of this work feel this is intrinsically flawed. They show how recent research in philosophy and social science--together with a longer tradition in theological inquiry--insist that community, mutuality, and relationship are fundamental to a full concept of personhood. The authors argue that "persons-in-community" provides a more defensible grounding for journalists' professional moral decision-making in crucial areas such as truthtelling, privacy, organizational culture, and balanced coverage. With numerous examples drawn from life as well as from theory, this book will interest journalists, editors, and professionals in media management as well as students and scholars of media ethics, reporting, and media law.

Aesthetic Ecology of Communication Ethics

There is a mutuality regarding the notion of participation in the part–whole relationship that facilitates the emergence and continuous unfolding of meaning. Gadamer (2007) refers to the Greek word methexis in discussing participation, ...

Aesthetic Ecology of Communication Ethics

This book introduces the framework of aesthetic ecology to communication studies as well as the study of communication ethics underlining the importance of the interplay between our sensuous and interpretive engagements in/with the world.

Jewish Religious and Philosophical Ethics

... being is an integral part of the reciprocity of relation, a meaning Buber says “one should not try to dilute. ... “rational agents” with whom ethical theory often has been preoccupied, underscores the uniqueness of the mutual, ...

Jewish Religious and Philosophical Ethics

Twentieth century continental thinkers such as Bergson, Levinas and Jonas have brought fresh and renewed attentions to Jewish ethics, yet it still remains fairly low profile in the Anglophone academic world. This collection of critical essays brings together the work of established and up-and-coming scholars from Israel, the United States, and around the world on the topic of Jewish religious and philosophical ethics. The chapters are broken into three main sections – Rabbinics, Philosophy, and Contemporary Challenges. The authors address, using a variety of research strategies, the work of both major and lesser-known figures in historical Jewish religious and philosophical traditions. The book discusses a wide variety of topics related to Jewish ethics, including "ethics and the Mishnah," "Afro Jewish ethics," "Jewish historiographical ethics," as well as the conceptual/philosophical foundations of the law and virtues in the work of Martin Buber, Hermann Cohen, and Baruch Spinoza.The volume closes with four contributions on present-day frontiers in Jewish ethics. As the first book to focus on the nature, scope and ramifications of the Jewish ethics at work in religious and philosophical contexts, this book will be of great interest to anyone studying Jewish Studies, Philosophy and Religion.

Just Love

Winner of the 2008 Grawemeyer Award in Religion This long-awaited book by one of American Christianity's foremost ethicists proposes a framework for sexual ethics whereby justice is the criterion for all loving, including love that is ...

Just Love

Winner of the 2008 Grawemeyer Award in Religion This long-awaited book by one of American Christianity's foremost ethicists proposes a framework for sexual ethics whereby justice is the criterion for all loving, including love that is related to sexual activity and relationships. It begins with historical and cross-cultural explorations, then addresses the large questions of embodiment, gender, and sexuality, and finally delineates the justice framework for sexual ethics. Though Just Love's particular focus is Christian sexual ethics, Farley's framework is broad enough to have relevance for multiple traditions. Also covered are specific issues in sexual ethics, including same-sex relationships, marriage and family, divorce and second marriage.

Global Pandemics and Epistemic Crises in Psychology

It is a relational good, for instance, when a person chooses suffering or sadness for the sake of a meaningful relationship. ... There is a “moral” or lesson to everyone's story that cannot be avoided: relational ties of mutuality and ...

Global Pandemics and Epistemic Crises in Psychology

Using COVID-19 as a base, this groundbreaking book brings together several renowned scholars to explore the concept of crisis, and how this global event has shaped the discipline of psychology. It engages directly with the challenges that psychology continues to face when theorizing societal issues of gender, race, class, history, and culture, while not disregarding "lived" experiences. This edited volume offers a set of pathways to rethink psychology beyond its current scope and history to become more apt to the conditions, needs, and demands of the 21st century. The book explores topics like resilience, interpersonal relationships, mistrust in the government, and access to healthcare. Dividing the book into three distinct sections, the contributors first examine the current crisis within psychology, then go on to explore how psychology theorizes the subject and the other in a social world of perpetual political, economic, cultural, and social crises, and lastly consider the role of crises in the creation of new theorizing. This is essential reading for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students of theoretical and philosophical psychology, social psychology, community psychology, and developmental psychology.