Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia

In Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia, leading linguists, ethnographers, ethnohistorians, and archaeologists interpret their research from a unique nonessentialist perspective to form a more accurate picture of the ethnolinguistic diversity in ...

Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia

"A major contribution to Amazonian anthropology, and possibly a direction changer." -J. Scott Raymond,University of Calgary A transdisciplinary collaboration among ethnologists, linguists, and archaeologists, Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia traces the emergence, expansion, and decline of cultural identities in indigenous Amazonia. Hornborg and Hill argue that the tendency to link language, culture, and biology--essentialist notions of ethnic identities--is a Eurocentric bias that has characterized largely inaccurate explanations of the distribution of ethnic groups and languages in Amazonia. The evidence, however, suggests a much more fluid relationship among geography, language use, ethnic identity, and genetics. In Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia, leading linguists, ethnographers, ethnohistorians, and archaeologists interpret their research from a unique nonessentialist perspective to form a more accurate picture of the ethnolinguistic diversity in this area. Revealing how ethnic identity construction is constantly in flux, contributors show how such processes can be traced through different ethnic markers such as pottery styles and languages. Scholars and students studying lowland South America will be especially interested, as will anthropologists intrigued by its cutting-edge, interdisciplinary approach.

Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia

Although the contributors to Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia represent several disciplines and may employ slightly different definitions of ethnicity (e.g., DeBoer, this volume; Scaramelli and Scaramelli, this volume), they all make ...

Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia

"A major contribution to Amazonian anthropology, and possibly a direction changer." -J. Scott Raymond,University of Calgary A transdisciplinary collaboration among ethnologists, linguists, and archaeologists, Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia traces the emergence, expansion, and decline of cultural identities in indigenous Amazonia. Hornborg and Hill argue that the tendency to link language, culture, and biology--essentialist notions of ethnic identities--is a Eurocentric bias that has characterized largely inaccurate explanations of the distribution of ethnic groups and languages in Amazonia. The evidence, however, suggests a much more fluid relationship among geography, language use, ethnic identity, and genetics. In Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia, leading linguists, ethnographers, ethnohistorians, and archaeologists interpret their research from a unique nonessentialist perspective to form a more accurate picture of the ethnolinguistic diversity in this area. Revealing how ethnic identity construction is constantly in flux, contributors show how such processes can be traced through different ethnic markers such as pottery styles and languages. Scholars and students studying lowland South America will be especially interested, as will anthropologists intrigued by its cutting-edge, interdisciplinary approach.

A Companion to Ethnicity in the Ancient Mediterranean

“Ethnogenesis, Regional Integration, and Ecology in Prehistoric Amazonia.” Current Anthropology, 46.4: 589–620. Hornborg, Alf and Jonathan D. Hill, eds. 2011. Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia. Reconstructing Past Identities from ...

A Companion to Ethnicity in the Ancient Mediterranean

A Companion to Ethnicity in the Ancient Mediterranean presents a comprehensive collection of essays contributed by Classical Studies scholars that explore questions relating to ethnicity in the ancient Mediterranean world. Covers topics of ethnicity in civilizations ranging from ancient Egypt and Israel, to Greece and Rome, and into Late Antiquity Features cutting-edge research on ethnicity relating to Philistine, Etruscan, and Phoenician identities Reveals the explicit relationships between ancient and modern ethnicities Introduces an interpretation of ethnicity as an active component of social identity Represents a fundamental questioning of formally accepted and fixed categories in the field

Amazonian Kichwa of the Curaray River

In Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia: Reconstructing Past Identities from Archaeology, Linguistics, and Ethnohistory, edited by Alf Hornborg and Jonathan D. Hill, 259–77. Boulder: University of Colorado Press.

Amazonian Kichwa of the Curaray River

This ethnography explores ways in which Amazonian Kichwa narrative, ritual, and concepts of place link extended kin groups into a regional society within Amazonian Ecuador.

The Ashgate Research Companion to Anthropology

Keepers of the Sacred Chants: The Poetics of Ritual Power in an Amazonian Society. ... In Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia: Reconstructing Past Identities from Archaeology, Linguistics, and Ethnohistory, edited by Alf Hornborg and Jonathan ...

The Ashgate Research Companion to Anthropology

This companion provides an indispensable overview of contemporary and classical issues in social and cultural anthropology. Although anthropology has expanded greatly over time in terms of the diversity of topics in which its practitioners engage, many of the broad themes and topics at the heart of anthropological thought remain perennially vital, such as understanding order and change, diversity and continuity, and conflict and co-operation in the reproduction of social life. Bringing together leading scholars in the field, the contributors to this volume provide us with thoughtful and fruitful ways of thinking about a number of contemporary and long-standing arenas of work where both established and more recent researchers are engaged. The companion begins by exploring classic topics such as Religion; Rituals; Language and Culture; Violence; and Gender. This is followed by a focus on current developments within the discipline including Human Rights; Globalization; and Diasporas and Cosmopolitanism. It provides an interesting and challenging look at the state of current thinking in anthropology, serving as a rich resource for scholars and students alike.

Landesque Capital

“Village Size and Permanence in Amazonia: Two Archaeological Examples from Brazil. ... In Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia: Reconstructing Past Identities from Archaeology, Linguistics, and Ethnohistory, 129–151, edited by A. Hornborg and ...

Landesque Capital

This book is the first comprehensive, global treatment of landesque capital, a widespread concept used to understand anthropogenic landscapes that serve important economic, social, and ritual purposes. Spanning the disciplines of anthropology, human ecology, geography, archaeology, and history, chapters combine theoretical rigor with in-depth empirical studies of major landscape modifications from ancient to contemporary times. They assess not only degradation but also the social, political, and economic institutions and contexts that make sustainability possible. Offering tightly edited, original contributions from leading scholars, this book will have a lasting influence on the study long-term human-environment relations in the human and natural sciences.

Indigenous Youth in Brazilian Amazonia

In Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia: Reconstructing Past Identities fi'om Archaeology, Linguistics, and Ethnohistory, edited by Alf Hornborg and Jonathan D. Hill, 279498. Boulder: University Press of Colorado. . 2011b.

Indigenous Youth in Brazilian Amazonia

In Latin America, young indigenous people have become visible subjects in ethnic and interethnic encounters. Their engagement with the global world, institutions, technology, religious ideas, and politics tells us how indigenous groups adapt, transform, and innovate in relation to wider social and cultural trends, and how resilient modes of thinking and practices are. We need to consider their transition to adulthood as a core dimension of personhood. Equally, if we are to understand young people, we must know how they shape their values, actions, and identity. So how do Amazonian native young people perceive, question and/or negotiate the new kinds of social and cultural situations in which they find themselves? Virtanen looks at how current power relations constituted by ethnic recognition, new social contacts, and cooperation with different institutions have shaped the current native youth in Amazonia. Using detailed ethnographic account of the Manchineri community, the study examines at indigenous youths' new transition to adulthood, their responsibilities, and experiences related to, for instance, urbanization, and global youth cultures.

Language Coffee and Migration on an Andean Amazonian Frontier

“Ethnogenesis at the Interface of the Andes and the Amazon: Re-examining Ethnicity in the Piedmont Region of Apolobamba, Bolivia.” In Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia: Reconstructing Past Identities from Archaeology, Linguistics, ...

Language  Coffee  and Migration on an Andean Amazonian Frontier

"This ethnography takes us to remote Amazonian villages, dusty frontier towns, roadside bargaining sessions, and coffee traders' homes to offer a new view of settlement frontiers as they are negotiated in linguistic interactions and social relationships. The book brings together a fine-grained analysis of multilingualism with urgent issues in Latin America today. It is a timely on-the-ground perspective on the agricultural colonization of the Amazon, which has triggered an environmental emergency threatening the future of the planet"--

Religion and Politics in the Ancient Americas

Heckenberger, Michael 2002 Rethinking the Arawakan Diaspora: Hierarchy, Regionality, and the Amazonian Formative. ... Hill, Jonathan David, and Alf Hornborg 2011 Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia: Reconstructing Past Identities From ...

Religion and Politics in the Ancient Americas

This exciting collection explores the interplay of religion and politics in the precolumbian Americas. Each thought-provoking contribution positions religion as a primary factor influencing political innovations in this period, reinterpreting major changes through an examination of how religion both facilitated and constrained transformations in political organization and status relations. Offering unparalleled geographic and temporal coverage of this subject, Religion and Politics in the Ancient Americas spans the entire precolumbian period, from Preceramic Peru to the Contact period in eastern North America, with case studies from North, Middle, and South America. Religion and Politics in the Ancient Americas considers the ways in which religion itself generated political innovation and thus enabled political centralization to occur. It moves beyond a "Great Tradition" focus on elite religion to understand how local political authority was negotiated, contested, bolstered, and undermined within diverse constituencies, demonstrating how religion has transformed non-Western societies. As well as offering readers fresh perspectives on specific archaeological cases, this book breaks new ground in the archaeological examination of religion and society.

Upper Peren Arawak Narratives of History Landscape and Ritual

In Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia: Reconstructing Past Identities from Archaeology, Linguistics, and Ethnohistory, ed. Alf Hornborg and Jonathan D. Hill, 259–77. Boulder: University Press of Colorado. ——— . 1993.

Upper Peren   Arawak Narratives of History  Landscape  and Ritual

Published through the Recovering Languages and Literacies of the Americas initiative, supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The rich storytelling traditions of the Alto Perené Arawaks of eastern Peru are showcased in this bilingual collection of traditional narratives, ethnographic accounts, women’s autobiographical stories, songs, chants, and ritual speeches. The Alto Perené speakers are located in the colonization frontier at the foot of the eastern Andes and the western fringe of the Amazonian jungle. Unfortunately, their language has a slim chance of surviving because only about three hundred fluent speakers remain. This volume collects and preserves the power and vitality of Alto Perené oral and linguistic traditions, as told by thirty members of the Native community. Upper Perené Arawak Narratives of History, Landscape, and Ritual covers a range of themes in the Alto Perené oral tradition, through genres such as myths, folk tales, autobiographical accounts, and ethnographic texts about customs and rituals, as well as songs, chants, and oratory. Transcribed and translated by Elena Mihas, a specialist in Northern Kampa language varieties, and grounded in the actual performances of Alto Perené speakers, this collection makes these stories available in English for the first time. Each original text in Alto Perené is accompanied by an English translation, and each theme is introduced with an essay providing biographical, cultural, and linguistic information. This collection of oral literature is masterful and authoritative as well as entertaining and provocative, testifying to the power of Alto Perené storytelling.

Amerindian Socio Cosmologies between the Andes Amazonia and Mesoamerica

“Too Many Owners: Mastery and Ownership in Amazonia.” In Animism in Rainforest and Tundra: Personhood, Animals, Plants and Things in contemporary Amazonia and Siberia, edited by Marc Brightman, ... Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia.

Amerindian Socio Cosmologies between the Andes  Amazonia and Mesoamerica

This book offers a new anthropological understanding of the socio-cosmological and ontological characteristics of the Isthmo–Colombian Area, beyond established theories for Amazonia, the Andes and Mesoamerica. It focuses on a core region that has been largely neglected by comparative anthropology in recent decades. Centering on relations between Chibchan groups and their neighbors, the contributions consider prevailing socio-cosmological principles and their relationship to Amazonian animism and Mesoamerican and Andean analogism. Classical notions of area homogeneity are reconsidered and the book formulates an overarching proposal for how to make sense of the heterogeneity of the region’s indigenous groups. Drawing on original fieldwork and comparative analysis, the volume provides a valuable anthropological addition to archaeological and linguistic knowledge of the Isthmo・Colombian Area.

Rethinking the Andes Amazonia Divide

'An Attempt to Understand Panoan Ethnogenesis in Relation to LongTerm Patterns and Transformations of Regional Interaction in Western Amazonia'. In Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia: Reconstructing Past Identities from Archaeology, ...

Rethinking the Andes   Amazonia Divide

Nowhere on Earth is there an ecological transformation so swift and so extreme as between the snow-line of the high Andes and the tropical rainforest of Amazonia. The different disciplines that research the human past in South America have long tended to treat these two great subzones of the continent as self-contained enough to be taken independently of each other. Objections have repeatedly been raised, however, to warn against imagining too sharp a divide between the people and societies of the Andes and Amazonia, when there are also clear indications of significant connections and transitions between them. Rethinking the Andes–Amazonia Divide brings together archaeologists, linguists, geneticists, anthropologists, ethnohistorians and historians to explore both correlations and contrasts in how the various disciplines see the relationship between the Andes and Amazonia, from deepest prehistory up to the European colonial period. The volume emerges from an innovative programme of conferences and symposia conceived explicitly to foster awareness, discussion and co-operation across the divides between disciplines. Underway since 2008, this programme has already yielded major publications on the Andean past, including History and Language in the Andes (2011) and Archaeology and Language in the Andes (2012).

The Only True People

Ethnic Groups and Boundaries: The Social Organization of Cultural Difference. Boston: Little, Brown. ... In Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia: Reconstructing Past Identitiesfrom Archaeology, Linguistics, and Ethnohistory, ed.

 The Only True People

"The Only True People" is a timely and rigorous examination of ethnicity among the ancient and modern Maya, focusing on ethnogenesis and exploring the complexities of Maya identity—how it developed, where and when it emerged, and why it continues to change over time. In the volume, a multidisciplinary group of well-known scholars including archaeologists, linguists, ethnographers, ethnohistorians, and epigraphers investigate ethnicity and other forms of group identity at a number of Maya sites and places, from the northern reaches of the Yucatan to the Southern Periphery, and across different time periods, from the Classic period to the modern day. Each contribution challenges the notion of ethnically homogenous "Maya peoples" for their region and chronology and explores how their work contributes to the definition of "ethnicity" for ancient Maya society. Contributors confront some of the most difficult theoretical debates concerning identity in the literature today: how different ethnic groups define themselves in relation to others; under what circumstances ethnicity is marked by overt expressions of group membership and when it is hidden from view; and the processes that transform ethnic identities and their expressions. By addressing the social constructs and conditions behind Maya ethnicity, both past and present, "The Only True People" contributes to the understanding of ethnicity as a complex set of relationships among people who lived in real and imagined communities, as well as among people separated by social boundaries. The volume will be a key resource for Mayanists and will be of interest to students and scholars of ethnography, anthropology, and cultural studies as well. Contributors: McCale Ashenbrener, Ellen E. Bell, Marcello A. Canuto, Juan Castillo Cocom, David A. Freidel, Wolfgang Gabbert, Stanley P. Guente, Jonathan Hill, Charles Andrew Hofling, Martha J. Macri, Damien B. Marken, Matthew Restall, Timoteo Rodriguez, Mathew C. Samson, Edward Schortman, Rebecca Storey

Amazonian Cosmopolitans

“Utilização das fotografias aéreas nas explorações geográficas.” Revista Brasileira de Geografia 12, no. 2: 51–268. Hornborg, Alf, and Jonathan D Hill. 2011. Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia: Reconstructing Past Identities from Archaeology ...

Amazonian Cosmopolitans

Amazonian Cosmopolitans explores how two Kawaiwete Indigenous leaders, Sabino and Prepori, lived in a much more complicated and globally connected Amazon than most people realize.

Amazonian Spanish

In A. Hornborg & J. D. Hill (Eds.), Ethnicity in ancient Amazonia (pp. 225–236). Denver, CO: University Press of Colorado. Carvalho, A. M. (Ed). (2009). Português em contato. Madrid, Spain/Frankfurt, Germany: Iberoamericana/Vervuert.

Amazonian Spanish

Amazonian Spanish: Language contact and evolution explores the unique origins, linguistic features, and geo-political situation of the Spanish that has emerged in the Amazon. While this region boasts much linguistic diversity, many of the indigenous languages found within its limits are now being replaced by Spanish. This situation of language expansion, contact, and bilingualism is reshaping the sociolinguistic landscape of the Amazon by creating a number of Spanish varieties with innovative linguistic features that require closer scholarly attention. The current book documents this situation in detail. The chapters in this volume include work on distinct geographical regions of the Amazon, with primary data collected using different methodologies and language contact situations. The scholars in this volume specialize in an array of fields, including anthropological linguistics, bilingualism, language contact, dialectology, and language acquisition. Their work represents both formal and functional approaches to linguistics.

Approaches to Measuring Linguistic Differences

In Handbook of Amazonian languages, Vol 1, Desmond Derbyshire and Geoffrey Pullum (eds.) ... In Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia: Reconstructing Past Identities from Archaeology, Linguistics, and Rthnohistory, Alf Hornborg, and Jonathan D.

Approaches to Measuring Linguistic Differences

The present volume collects contributions addressing different aspects of the measurement of linguistic differences, a topic which probably is as old as language itself butat the same timehas acquired renewed interest over the last decade or so, reflecting a rapid development of data-intensive computing in all fields of research, including linguistics.

Languages of the Amazon

Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia. Denver: University Press of Colorado. Huber, R. Q. and R. B. Reed. 1992. Comparative vocabulary. Selected words in indigenous languages of Colombia. Santafe ́ de Bogota ́: Asociacio ́n Instituto Lingu ...

Languages of the Amazon

The first guide to Amazonia's over 300 languages compares their features, sets out their characteristics, and describes the cultures of those who speak them. Clearly written and brought vividly to life with anecdotes from the author's fieldwork, this is both an essential reference and an accessible introduction for linguistics and anthropologists.

South American Contributions to World Archaeology

Neves, E. G. (2011). Archaeological cultures and past identities in the pre-colonial Central Amazon. In A. Hornborg & J. D. Hill (Eds.), Ethnicity in ancient Amazonian: Reconstructing past identities from archaeology, linguistics and ...

South American Contributions to World Archaeology


Hunter gatherers in a Changing World

Archaeological cultures and past identities in the pre-colonial Central Amazon. In A. Hornborg & J. D. Hill (Eds.), Ethnicity in ancient Amazonia: Reconstructing past identities from archeology, linguistics, and ethnohistory (pp.

Hunter gatherers in a Changing World

This book compiles a collection of case studies analysing drivers of and responses to change amongst contemporary hunter-gatherers. Contemporary hunter-gatherers’ livelihoods are examined from perspectives ranging from historical legacy to environmental change, and from changes in national economic, political and legal systems to more broad-scale and universal notions of globalization and acculturation. Far from the commonly held romantic view that hunter-gatherers continue to exist as isolated populations living a traditional lifestyle in harmony with the environment, contemporary hunter-gatherers – like many rural communities around the world - face a number of relatively new ecological and social challenges to which they are pressed to adapt. Contemporary hunter-gatherer societies are increasingly and rapidly being affected by Global Changes, related both to biophysical Earth systems (i.e., changes in climate, biodiversity and natural resources, and water availability), and to social systems (i.e. demographic transitions, sedentarisation, integration into the market economy, and all the socio-cultural change that these and other factors trigger). Chapter 10 of this book is open access under a CC BY 4.0 license.

The Oxford Handbook of Caribbean Archaeology

Rethinking the Arawakan Diaspora: Hierarchy, Regionality, and the Amazonian Formative. In Comparative Arawakan Histories: ... Ethnicity in Ancient Amazonia: Reconstructing Past Identities from Archaeology, Linguistics, and Ethnohistory.

The Oxford Handbook of Caribbean Archaeology

This volume brings together examples of the best research to address the complexity of the Caribbean past.