Every Song Ever

This new age of listening brings with it astonishing new possibilities--as well as dangers. In Every Song Ever, the veteran New York Times music critic Ben Ratliff reimagines the very idea of music appreciation for our times.

Every Song Ever

What is music in the age of the cloud? Today, we can listen to nearly anything, at any time. It is possible to flit instantly across genres and generations, from 1980s Detroit techno to 1890s Viennese neo-romanticism. This new age of listening brings with it astonishing new possibilities--as well as dangers. In Every Song Ever, the veteran New York Times music critic Ben Ratliff reimagines the very idea of music appreciation for our times. In the age of the cloud, the genre of the recording and the intention of the composer matter less and less. Instead, we can savor our own listening experience more directly, taking stock of qualities like repetition, speed, density, or loudness. The result is a new mode of listening that can lead to unexpected connections. When we listen for slowness, we may detect surprising affinities between the drone metal of Sunn O))), the mixtape manipulations of DJ Screw, and the final works of Shostakovich. And if we listen for more elusive qualities like closeness, we might notice how the tight harmonies of bluegrass vocals illuminate the virtuosic synchrony of John Coltrane's quartet. Encompassing the sounds of five continents and several centuries, Ratliff's book is a definitive field guide to our musical habitat, and a foundation for the new aesthetics our age demands.

Our One Word

Listen to different types of music and describe what you are hearing. As Ben Ratliff writes in his book Every Song Ever: Twenty Ways to Listen in an Age of Musical Plenty1 “sounds are running ahead of our vocabularies for describing ...

Our One Word

• Author of best-selling book Love Feast • Chapters contain questions for group discussion and/or personal contemplation • Perfect for a Lenten practice that easily fits even a busy lifestyle Women live uniquely demanding lives as providers, managers, caretakers, and, amidst those many roles, both chosen and cast upon them, the individual spirit sometimes loses her voice. To awaken this voice, Martha Bourlakas began a group for women in the Diocese of Southwestern Virginia called “Our One Word” to pray about and observe the secular, holy, and personal significance of one word each week. This simple goal affects participants in profound ways, and now Bourlakas shares their practice with the rest of us in book form. She provides a structure and resource for those who want to start a group, as well as meditation for anyone who wants to expand her or his own spiritual horizons. The book encompasses words Bourlakas has offered to groups in the weekly format and at weekend retreats. Each chapter focuses on a different word, such as Joy, Heart, Change. There are brief quotations from religious texts, literature, music, etc. that explicate the word, combined with her own perspective. Our One Word offers a way for individuals or groups to cultivate a hospitable, constant presence, modeling the power of the Holy Spirit in our lives—a way to celebrate, pray, just be.

The Oxford Handbook of Sound Art

Iyer is asked what chapter he would add to music critic Ben Ratliff's Every Song Ever: Twenty Ways to Listen in an Age of Musical Plenty (2016a). Ratliff's book dispenses with traditional categories of music analysis in ...

The Oxford Handbook of Sound Art

Sound art has long been resistant to its own definition. Emerging from a liminal space between movements of thought and practice in the twentieth century, sound art has often been described in terms of the things that it is understood to have left behind: a space between music, fine art, and performance. The Oxford Handbook of Sound Art surveys the practices, politics, and emerging frameworks of thought that now define this previously amorphous area of study. Throughout the Handbook, artists and thinkers explore the uses of sound in contemporary arts practice. Imbued with global perspectives, chapters are organized in six overarching themes of Space, Time, Things, Fabric, Senses and Relationality. Each theme represents a key area of development in the visual arts and music during the second half of the twentieth century from which sound art emerged. By offering a set of thematic frameworks through which to understand these themes, this Handbook situates constellations of disparate thought and practice into recognized centers of activity.

Music and Death

Every song ever: Twenty ways to listen in an age of musical plenty. New York, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Rush. (1980). Permanent waves. Chicago, IL: Mercury Records. Snapcase. (1994). Lookinglasself. Chicago, IL: Victory Records.

Music and Death

Music is often our companion when dealing with the incomprehensibility of loss. This edited collection speaks to the multifarious and complex ways in which music accompanies, supplements, and complements aspects of death and dying, whether this is the death of a loved one, or a celebrity from popular culture.

Encyclopedia of Great Popular Song Recordings

The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, second edition (29 volumes; Grove/MacMillan Publishers, 2001). Ben Ratliff, Every Song Ever: Twenty Ways to Listen In an Age of Musical Plenty (Farrar, Straus, & Giroux, 2016).

Encyclopedia of Great Popular Song Recordings

This masterful survey covers all genres of popular music, from pop, rock, soul, and country to jazz, blues, classic vocals, hip-hop, folk, gospel, and ethnic/world music. Collectors will find detailed discographical data while music lovers will appreciate the detailed commentaries and deep research on the songs, their recording, and the artists.

The Teaching of Instrumental Music

9. 10. 11. 12. Carl Fischer Music. Copland, A. (2002). What to Listen for in Music. New York: Signet Classics. Ratliff, B. (2016). Every Song Ever: Twenty Ways to Listen in an Age of Musical Plenty. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

The Teaching of Instrumental Music

The Teaching of Instrumental Music, Fifth Edition introduces music education majors to basic instrumental pedagogy for the instruments and ensembles commonly found in the elementary and secondary curricula. It focuses on the core competencies required for teacher certification in instrumental music, with the pervasive philosophy to assist teachers as they develop an instrumental music program based on understanding and respecting all types of music. Parts I and II focus on essential issues for a successful instrumental program, presenting first the history and foundations, followed by effective strategies in administrative tasks and classroom teaching. Parts III, IV, and V are devoted to the skills and techniques of woodwind, brass and percussion, and string instruments. In all, The Teaching of Instrumental Music is the complete reference for the beginning instrumental teacher, commonly retained in a student’s professional library for its unique and comprehensive coverage. NEW TO THIS EDITION: Revision and updating of curriculum developments, such as coordinating State Department of Education student learning objectives with the recent Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) New discussion of the NAfME National Standards as they relate to the teaching of instrumental music Revamping of rehearsing instrumental ensembles chapters, including new or expanded sections on programming, choosing quality music, and applying successful rehearsal techniques Updates on references, plus new discussion questions, and websites and internet links A chapter devoted to classroom guitar Updates on the use of technology for teaching and learning music More on healthy performance practice, marching band, and jazz band Online materials located in the eResources section on the Routledge website.

Ageing and Contemporary Female Musicians

Railton, D., and Watson, P. (2011) Music Video and the Politics of Representation. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. Ratliff, B. (2016) Every Song Ever: Twenty Ways to Listen in an Age of Musical Plenty. London: Picador.

Ageing and Contemporary Female Musicians

Ageing and Contemporary Female Musicians focuses on ageing within contemporary popular music. It argues that context, genres, memoirs, racial politics and place all contribute to how women are 'aged' in popular music. Framing contemporary female musicians as canonical grandmothers, Rude Girls, neo-Afrofuturist and memoirists settling accounts, the book gives us some respite from a decline or denial narrative and introduces a dynamism into ageing. Female rock memoirs are age-appropriate survival stories that reframe the histories of punk and independent rock music. Old age has a functional and canonical ‘place’ in the work of Shirley Collins and Calypso Rose. Janelle Monáe, Christine and the Queens and Anohni perform ‘queer’ age, specifically a kind of ‘going beyond’ both corporeal and temporal borders. Genres age, and the book introduces the idea of the time-crunch; an encounter between an embodied, represented age and a genre-age, which is, itself, produced through historicity and aesthetics. Lastly the book goes behind the scenes to draw on interviews and questionnaires with 19 women involved in the contemporary British and American popular music industry; DIY and ex-musicians, producers, music publishers, music journalists and audio engineers. Ageing and Contemporary Female Musicians is a vital intergenerational feminist viewpoint for researchers and students in gender studies, popular music, popular culture, media studies, cultural studies and ageing studies.

The Routledge Companion to Popular Music History and Heritage

Theory and method in historical ethnomusicology. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books. Ratliff, B., 2016. Every song ever: twenty ways to listen in an age of musical plenty. New York: Farrar, Strauss and Giroux. Reigle, R., 2008.

The Routledge Companion to Popular Music History and Heritage

The Routledge Companion to Popular Music History and Heritage examines the social, cultural, political and economic value of popular music as history and heritage. Taking a cross-disciplinary approach, the volume explores the relationship between popular music and the past, and how interpretations of the changing nature of the past in post-industrial societies play out in the field of popular music. In-depth chapters cover key themes around historiography, heritage, memory and institutions, alongside case studies from around the world, including the UK, Australia, South Africa and India, exploring popular music’s connection to culture both past and present. Wide-ranging in scope, the book is an excellent introduction for students and scholars working in musicology, ethnomusicology, popular music studies, critical heritage studies, cultural studies, memory studies and other related fields.

The Cambridge Companion to Music in Digital Culture

Current of Music: Elements of a Radio Theory, edited and translated by Robert Hullot-Kentor. ... Journal of the Society of American Music 12(3): 233–67. ... Every Song Ever: Twenty Ways to Listen in an Age of Musical Plenty.

The Cambridge Companion to Music in Digital Culture

Digital technology has profoundly transformed almost all aspects of musical culture. This book explains how and why.

Frontiers of Creative Industries

J. (1999). music and adolescent identity. ... What does it mean to be a music critic in the age of the stealth release? retrieved from ... Every song ever: Twenty ways to listen in an age of musical plenty. london: penguin ...

Frontiers of Creative Industries

Creative industries are a growing and globally important area for both economic vitality and cultural expression of industrialized nations. This volume examines their institutional, categorical and structural dynamics to provide an overview of new trends and emerging issues in scholarship on this topic.

Switched on Pop

How Popular Music Works, and Why It Matters Nate Sloan, Charlie Harding. 123 125–126 126 127 It's all replayed, ... Every Song Ever: Twenty Ways to Listen in an Age of Musical Plenty (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2016), 7.

Switched on Pop

Pop music surrounds us - in our cars, over supermarket speakers, even when we are laid out at the dentist - but how often do we really hear what's playing? Switched on Pop is the book based on the eponymous podcast that has been hailed by NPR, Rolling Stone, The Guardian, and Entertainment Weekly for its witty and accessible analysis of Top 40 hits. Through close studies of sixteen modern classics, musicologist Nate Sloan and songwriter Charlie Harding shift pop from the background to the foreground, illuminating the essential musical concepts behind two decades of chart-topping songs. In 1939, Aaron Copland published What to Listen for in Music, the bestseller that made classical music approachable for generations of listeners. Eighty years later, Nate and Charlie update Copland's idea for a new audience and repertoire: 21st century pop, from Britney to Beyoncé, Outkast to Kendrick Lamar. Despite the importance of pop music in contemporary culture, most discourse only revolves around lyrics and celebrity. Switched on Pop gives readers the tools they need to interpret our modern soundtrack. Each chapter investigates a different song and artist, revealing musical insights such as how a single melodic motif follows Taylor Swift through every genre that she samples, André 3000 uses metric manipulation to get listeners to "shake it like a Polaroid picture," or Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee create harmonic ambiguity in "Despacito" that mirrors the patterns of global migration. Replete with engaging discussions and eye-catching illustrations, Switched on Pop brings to life the musical qualities that catapult songs into the pop pantheon. Readers will find themselves listening to familiar tracks in new waysand not just those from the Top 40. The timeless concepts that Nate and Charlie define can be applied to any musical style. From fanatics to skeptics, teenagers to octogenarians, non-musicians to professional composers, every music lover will discover something ear-opening in Switched on Pop.

The Routledge Companion to the Study of Local Musicking

Every Song Ever: Twenty Ways to Listen in an Age of Musical Plenty. New York, NY: Farrar, Strous and Giroux. Rietveld, H. 2016. “Breaking the Electronic Sprawl.” In Keep It Simple, Keep It Fast: An Approach to Underground Music Scenes ...

The Routledge Companion to the Study of Local Musicking

The Routledge Companion to the Study of Local Musicking provides a reference to how, cross-culturally, musicking constructs locality and how locality is constructed by the musicking that takes place within it, that is, how people engage with ideas of community and place through music. The term "musicking" has gained currency in music studies, and refers to the diverse ways in which people engage with music, regardless of the nature of this engagement. By linking musicking to the local, this book highlights the ways in which musical practices and discourses interact with people’s everyday experiences and understandings of their immediate environment, their connections and commitment to that locality, and the people who exist within it. It explores what makes local musicking "local." By viewing musicking from the perspective of where it takes place, the contributions in this collection engage with debates on the processes of musicking, identity construction, community-building and network formation, competitions and rivalries, place and space making, and local-global dynamics.

Move On Up

American Music 22 (Summer 2004): 284–95. ———. Race Music: Black Cultures from Bebop to Hip-Hop. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004. Ratliff, Ben. Every Song Ever: Twenty Ways to Listen in an Age of Musical Plenty ...

Move On Up

A Chicago Tribune Book of 2019, Notable Chicago Reads A Booklist Top 10 Arts Book of 2019 A No Depression Top Music Book of 2019 Curtis Mayfield. The Chi-Lites. Chaka Khan. Chicago’s place in the history of soul music is rock solid. But for Chicagoans, soul music in its heyday from the 1960s to the 1980s was more than just a series of hits: it was a marker and a source of black empowerment. In Move On Up, Aaron Cohen tells the remarkable story of the explosion of soul music in Chicago. Together, soul music and black-owned businesses thrived. Record producers and song-writers broadcast optimism for black America’s future through their sophisticated, jazz-inspired productions for the Dells and many others. Curtis Mayfield boldly sang of uplift with unmistakable grooves like “We’re a Winner” and “I Plan to Stay a Believer.” Musicians like Phil Cohran and the Pharaohs used their music to voice Afrocentric philosophies that challenged racism and segregation, while Maurice White of Earth, Wind, and Fire and Chaka Khan created music that inspired black consciousness. Soul music also accompanied the rise of African American advertisers and the campaign of Chicago’s first black mayor, Harold Washington, in 1983. This empowerment was set in stark relief by the social unrest roiling in Chicago and across the nation: as Chicago’s homegrown record labels produced rising stars singing songs of progress and freedom, Chicago’s black middle class faced limited economic opportunities and deep-seated segregation, all against a backdrop of nationwide deindustrialization. Drawing on more than one hundred interviews and a music critic’s passion for the unmistakable Chicago soul sound, Cohen shows us how soul music became the voice of inspiration and change for a city in turmoil.

Cat Power s Moon Pix

His experience as a music writer intimidated but also made me see how a writer can grow. Ben Ratliff in discussion with ... Every Song Ever: Twenty Ways to Listen in an Age of Musical Plenty. Farrar, Straus and Giroux Farrar, ...

Cat Power s Moon Pix

Moon Pix was conceived during a hallucinatory waking nightmare in the South Carolina home of Chan Marshall one fateful day in 1997. Spirits violently swam up around her house, looming at the windows, beckoning her to join them. Her and her acoustic guitar warded them off song after song, nearly the entire album rushed forth onto a tape recorder that night. Facts, fictions and visions ripple throughout the accounts of Moon Pix from every angle- memories of screaming at an audience, spirals of drunkenness, swimming with sharks in Australia, intense, resonant lyrics and thunderstorms ringing through speakers. Like all legends, the aura surrounding them is an impression, a sensory feeling of unreliable memories: layers of stories become histories. Through interviews with key players, audience member accounts, fictional narrative imaginings, a collection of record reviews and other explorations of truth, this book, like Moon Pix itself, is an ode to the myth within the music and the music within the myth.

The Poetry of Pop

“Song has repetition built into it” Levitin, World in Six Songs, 126. ... “Certain pairings of singers” Ben Ratliff, Every Song Ever: Twenty Ways to Listen in an Age of Musical Plenty (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2016), 163.

The Poetry of Pop

From Tin Pan Alley to the Beatles to Beyoncé, "Mr. Bradley skillfully breaks down a century of standards and pop songs into their elements to reveal the interaction of craft and art in composition and performance." (The Wall Street Journal) Encompassing a century of recorded music, this pathbreaking book reveals the poetic artistry of popular songs. Pop songs are music first. They also comprise the most widely disseminated poetic expression of our time. Adam Bradley traces the song lyric across musical genres from early twentieth-century Delta blues to mid-century rock 'n' roll to today's hits. George and Ira Gershwin's "Fascinating Rhythm." The Rolling Stones' "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction." Rihanna's "Diamonds." These songs are united in their exacting attention to the craft of language and sound. Bradley shows that pop music is a poetry that must be heard more than read, uncovering the rhythms, rhymes, and metaphors expressed in the singing voice. At once a work of musical interpretation, cultural analysis, literary criticism, and personal storytelling, this book illustrates how words and music come together to produce compelling poetry, often where we least expect it.

Quadrophenia and Mod ern Culture

Kermode talks about the way the first song with lyrics on the album, “The Real Me” begins, “I went back to the doctor...” According to Kermode the first time he ... Every Song Ever: Twenty Ways to Listen in an Age of Musical Plenty.

Quadrophenia and Mod ern  Culture

This collection explores the centrality of The Who’s classic album, and Franc Roddam’s cult classic film of adolescent life, Quadrophenia to the recent cultural history of Britain, to British subcultural studies, and to a continuing fascination with Mod style and culture. The interdisciplinary chapters collected here set the album and film amongst critical contexts including gender and sexuality studies, class analysis, and the film and album’s urban geographies, seeing Quadrophenia as a transatlantic phenomenon and as a perennial adolescent story. Contributors view Quadrophenia through a variety of lenses, including the Who’s history and reception, the 1970s English political and social landscape, the adolescent novel of development (the bildungsroman), the perception of the film through the eyes of Mods and Mod revivalists, 1970s socialist politics, punk, glam, sharp suits, scooters and the Brighton train, arguing for the continuing richness of Quadrophenia’s depiction of the adolescent dilemma. The volume includes new interviews with Franc Roddam, director of Quadrophenia, and the photographer Ethan Russell, who took the photos for the album’s famous photo booklet.

Blues in the 21st Century Myth Self Expression and Trans Culturalism

He challenges musicians to discover other pathways to keeping this profound, powerful music creative and vital. References Barker, Steve. 2012a. ... Every Song Ever: Twenty Ways to Listen in an Age of Musical Plenty. New York: Picador.

Blues in the 21st Century  Myth  Self Expression and Trans Culturalism

The book is the fruit of Douglas Mark Ponton’s and co-editor Uwe Zagratzki’s enduring interest in the Blues as a musical and cultural phenomenon and source of personal inspiration. Continuing in the tradition of Blues studies established by the likes of Samuel Charters and Paul Oliver, the authors hope to contribute to the revitalisation of the field through a multi-disciplinary approach designed to explore this constantly evolving social phenomenon in all its heterogeneity. Focusing either on particular artists (Lightnin’ Hopkins, Robert Johnson), or specific texts (Langston Hughes’ Weary Blues and Backlash Blues, Jimi Hendrix’s Machine Gun), the book tackles issues ranging from authenticity and musicology in Blues performance to the Blues in diaspora, while also applying techniques of linguistic analysis to the corpora of Blues texts. While some chapters focus on the Blues as a quintessentially American phenomenon, linked to a specific social context, others see it in its current evolutions, as the bearer of vital cultural attitudes into the digital age. This multidisciplinary volume will appeal to a broad range of scholars operating in a number of different academic disciplines, including Musicology, Linguistics, Sociology, History, Ethnomusicology, Literature, Economics and Cultural Studies. It will also interest educators across the Humanities, and could be used to exemplify the application to data of specific analytical methodologies, and as a general introduction to the field of Blues studies.

Sonic Overload

Every Song Ever: Twenty Ways to Listen in an Age of Musical Plenty. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2016. Razlogov, K. E., and V. Yu. Khrapachev. “Muzïka v zvukozritel′nom sinteze (Teoriya i praktika: Interv′yu s kompozitorami E.

Sonic Overload

Sonic Overload offers a new, music-centered cultural history of the late Soviet Union. It focuses on polystylism in music as a response to the information overload swamping listeners in the Soviet Union during its final decades. It traces the ways in which leading composers Alfred Schnittke and Valentin Silvestrov initially embraced popular sources before ultimately rejecting them. Polystylism first responded to the utopian impulses of Soviet ideology with utopian impulses to encompass all musical styles, from "high" to "low". But these initial all-embracing aspirations were soon followed by retreats to alternate utopias founded on carefully selecting satisfactory borrowings, as familiar hierarchies of culture, taste, and class reasserted themselves. Looking at polystylism in the late USSR tells us about past and present, near and far, as it probes the musical roots of the overloaded, distracted present. Based on archival research, oral historical interviews, and other overlooked primary materials, as well as close listening and thorough examination of scores and recordings, Sonic Overload presents a multilayered and comprehensive portrait of late-Soviet polystylism and cultural life, and of the music of Silvestrov and Schnittke. Sonic Overload is intended for musicologists and Soviet, Russian, and Ukrainian specialists in history, the arts, film, and literature, as well as readers interested in twentieth- and twenty-first century music; modernism and postmodernism; quotation and collage; the intersections of "high" and "low" cultures; and politics and the arts.

Various Artists DJs do Guetto

7 Ben Ratliff, Every Song Ever: Twenty Ways to Listen in an Age of Musical Plenty (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2016), 8–9. 8 Noel Lobley, 'Hyperactive Musical Communities On- and Offline: Dancing and Producing Chicago Footwork, ...

Various Artists  DJs do Guetto

Call it batida, kuduro, Afro house, Lisbon bass: anyone with a keen ear for contemporary developments in global electronic dance music can't fail to have noticed the rise in popularity and influence of Lisbon-based DJs such as DJ Marfox, DJ Nervoso and Nídia. These DJs and producers have brought the sound of the Lisbon projects to the wider world via international club nights, festival appearances, recordings and remix projects for a range of international artists. This book uses the 2006 compilation DJs do Guetto as a prism for exploring this music's aesthetics and its roots in Lusophone Africa, its evolution in the immigrant communities of Lisbon and its journey from there to the world. The story is one of encounters: between people, sounds, neighborhoods, technologies and cultural contexts. Drawing on reflections by DJ Marfox and others, the book establishes DJs do Guetto as a foundation stone not only for a burgeoning music scene, but also for a newfound sense of pride in a place and a community.

Really the Blues

... for The New York Times since 1996 and has written four books including The Jazz Ear: Conversations over Music and Coltrane: The Story of a Sound. His latest book is Every Song Ever: Twenty Ways to Listen in an Age of Musical Plenty.

Really the Blues

Mezz Mezzrow was a boy from Chicago who learned to play the sax in reform school and pursued a life in music and a life of crime. He moved from Chicago to New Orleans to New York, working in brothels and bars, bootlegging, dealing drugs, getting hooked, doing time, producing records, and playing with the greats, among them Louis Armstrong, Bix Beiderbecke, and Fats Waller. Really the Blues, the jive-talking memoir that Mezzrow wrote at the insistence of, and with the help of, the novelist Bernard Wolfe, is the story of an unusual and unusually American life, and a portrait of a man who moved freely across racial boundaries when few could or did, “the odyssey of an individualist . . . the saga of a guy who wanted to make friends in a jungle where everyone was too busy making money.”