Evolutionary Relationships Among Rodents

Paradoxically, our understanding of the possible evolutionary relationships among different rodent families, as well as the possible affinities of rodents with other eutherian mammals, has not kept pace with this information "explosion.

Evolutionary Relationships Among Rodents

The order Rodentia is the most abundant and successful group of mammals, and it has been a focal point of attention for compar ative and evolutionary biologists for many years. In addition, rodents are the most commonly used experimental mammals for bio medical research, and they have played a central role in investi gations of the genetic and molecular mechanisms of speciation in mammals. During recent decades, a tremendous amount of new data from various aspects of the biology of living and fossil rodents has been accumulated by specialists from different disciplines, ranging from molecular biology to paleontology. Paradoxically, our understanding of the possible evolutionary relationships among different rodent families, as well as the possible affinities of rodents with other eutherian mammals, has not kept pace with this information "explosion. " This abundance of new biological data has not been incorporated into a broad synthesis of rodent phylo geny, in part because of the difficulty for any single student of rodent evolution to evaluate the phylogenetic significance of new findings from such diverse disciplines as paleontology, embryology, comparative anatomy, molecular biology, and cytogenetics. The origin and subsequent radiation of the order Rodentia were based primarily on the acquisition of a key character complex: specializations of the incisors, cheek teeth, and associated mus culoskeletal features of the jaws and skull for gnawing and chewing.

Evolutionary Relationships among Rodents

Several factors have contributed to the disagreements that surround analyses of rodent evolution. (1) The diversity of the group is a consequence of its extensive evolutionary radiation during Eocene–01igocene times, and the fossil ...

Evolutionary Relationships among Rodents

The order Rodentia is the most abundant and successful group of mammals, and it has been a focal point of attention for compar ative and evolutionary biologists for many years. In addition, rodents are the most commonly used experimental mammals for bio medical research, and they have played a central role in investi gations of the genetic and molecular mechanisms of speciation in mammals. During recent decades, a tremendous amount of new data from various aspects of the biology of living and fossil rodents has been accumulated by specialists from different disciplines, ranging from molecular biology to paleontology. Paradoxically, our understanding of the possible evolutionary relationships among different rodent families, as well as the possible affinities of rodents with other eutherian mammals, has not kept pace with this information "explosion. " This abundance of new biological data has not been incorporated into a broad synthesis of rodent phylo geny, in part because of the difficulty for any single student of rodent evolution to evaluate the phylogenetic significance of new findings from such diverse disciplines as paleontology, embryology, comparative anatomy, molecular biology, and cytogenetics. The origin and subsequent radiation of the order Rodentia were based primarily on the acquisition of a key character complex: specializations of the incisors, cheek teeth, and associated mus culoskeletal features of the jaws and skull for gnawing and chewing.

Evolution of the Rodents

A valuable resource for the latest research on rodents, highlighting links across palaeontology, developmental biology, functional morphology, phylogenetics and biomechanics.

Evolution of the Rodents

A valuable resource for the latest research on rodents, highlighting links across palaeontology, developmental biology, functional morphology, phylogenetics and biomechanics.

Wildlife Review

In : Evolutionary Relationships among Rodents - A Multidisciplinary Analysis . W. Patrick Luckett and Jean - Louis Hartenberger , editors . p . 1-33 . 1985. WR 214 ( School Med . , Univ . Puerto Rico , San Juan 00936 ) 89-006708 Huckle ...

Wildlife Review


The Tertiary Record of Rodents in North America

Li, C. K., and Ting, S. Y., 1985, Possible phylogenetic relationship of Asiatic eurymylids and rodents, with comments on mimotonids, in: Evolutionary Relationships among Rodents: A Multidisciplinary Analysis (W. P. Luckett and J.-L.

The Tertiary Record of Rodents in North America

Nearly half of the known species of mammals alive today (more than 1600) are rodents or "gnawing mammals" (Nowak and Paradiso, 1983). The diversity of rodents is greater than that of any other order of mammals. Thus, it is not surprising that the fossil record of this order is extensive and fossil material of rodents from the Tertiary is known from all continents except Antarctica and Australia. The purpose of this book is to compile the published knowledge on fossil rodents from North America and present it in a way that is accessible to paleontologists and mammalogists interested in evolutionary studies of ro dents. The literature on fossil rodents is widely scattered between journals on paleontology and mammalogy and in-house publications of museums and universities. Currently, there is no single source that offers ready access to the literature on a specific family of rodents and its fossil history. This work is presented as a reference text that can be useful to specialists in rodents (fossil or recent) as weIl as mammalian paleontologists working on whole faunas. Because the diversity of rodents in the world is essentially limitless, any monograph that included all fossil rodents would similarly be limitless. Hence, this book is limited to the re cord of Tertiary rodents of North America. The several species of South American (caviomorph) rodents that invaded North America near the end of the Tertiary are also not included in this text.

The Behavior of the Laboratory Rat

Journal of Mammalian Evolution 1:127-147. Luckett WP and Hartenberger J-L (1985) Evolutionary relationships among rodents: comments and conclusions. In: Evolutionary relationships among rodents: a multidisciplinary analysis (Luckett WP ...

The Behavior of the Laboratory Rat

Both seasoned and beginning investigators will be amazed at the range and complexity of rat behavior as described in the 43 chapters of this volume. The behavioral descriptions are closely tied to the laboratory methods from which they were derived, thus allowing the investigator to exploit both the behavior and the methods for their own research. It will also serve as an indispensable reference for other neuroscientists, psychologist, pharmacologists, geneticists, molecular biologists, zoologists, and their students and trainees.

Rodent Societies

The evolution of eusociality in molerats (Bathyergidae): A question of risks, numbers, and costs. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 28:37–45. ... In Evolutionary relationships among rodents: A multidisciplinary analysis, ed.

Rodent Societies

Rodent Societies synthesizes and integrates the current state of knowledge about the social behavior of rodents, providing ecological and evolutionary contexts for understanding their societies and highlighting emerging conservation and management strategies to preserve them. It begins with a summary of the evolution, phylogeny, and biogeography of social and nonsocial rodents, providing a historical basis for comparative analyses. Subsequent sections focus on group-living rodents and characterize their reproductive behaviors, life histories and population ecology, genetics, neuroendocrine mechanisms, behavioral development, cognitive processes, communication mechanisms, cooperative and uncooperative behaviors, antipredator strategies, comparative socioecology, diseases, and conservation. Using the highly diverse and well-studied Rodentia as model systems to integrate a variety of research approaches and evolutionary theory into a unifying framework, Rodent Societies will appeal to a wide range of disciplines, both as a compendium of current research and as a stimulus for future collaborative and interdisciplinary investigations.

The Biology of the Naked Mole Rat

In Chemical Signals in Vertebrates 4: Ecology, Evolution, and Comparative Biology. ... Evolution of sociality in insects. Q. Rev. Biol. 47:131–159. ... In Evolutionary Relationships among Rodents: A Multidisciplinary Analysis.

The Biology of the Naked Mole Rat

This volume brings together more than a decade of information collected in the field and lab on the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber), a northeast African mammal unique for its physical characteristics and eusociality. Nearly blind and virtually hairless, naked mole-rats inhabit large subterranean colonies in which only one female and her one to three mates conceive offspring, while the young from previous litters maintain and defend the group as do workers in colonies of the social insects. In this first major treatise on naked mole-rats an international group of researchers covers such topics as the evolution of eusociality, phylogeny and systematics of the rodent family Bathyergidae, population and behavioral ecology and genetics of naked mole-rats in the field, vocal and nonvocal behaviors, social organization and divisions of labor within colonies, and climatic, social, and physiological factors affecting growth, reproduction, and reproductive suppression. In addition to the editors, the contributors are D. H. Abbott, M. W. Allard, N. C. Bennett, R. A. Brett, S. H. Braude, B. Crespi, S. V. Edwards, C. G. Faulkes, L. M. George, R. L. Honeycutt, E. A. Lacey, C. E. Liddell, E. McDaid, K. Nelson, K. M. Noonan, J. O'Riain, J. W. Pepper, H. K. Reeve, and D. A. Schlitter. Originally published in 1991. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Mammal Species of the World

Comparative biology and evolutionary relationships of tree shrews. Plenum Press, New York, 314 pp. Luckett, W. P. 1985. Superordinal and intraordinal affinities of rodents: Developmental evidence from the dentition and placentation.

Mammal Species of the World

This indispensable reference work belongs in public and academic libraries throughout the world and on the shelf of every biologist who works with mammals.

Current Mammalogy

McKenna, M. C., 1961, A note on the origin of rodents, Am. Mus. Novit. 2037:1–5. ... Novacek, M. J., 1985, Cranial evidence for rodent affinities, in: Evolutionary Relationships among Rodents (W. P. Luckett and J.-L. Hartenberger, eds.) ...

Current Mammalogy

When I first proposed a series entitled Current Mammalogy to the pub lishers, they were reluctant to undertake such a project because they viewed the field of mammology as overly fragmented. At first I found this idea to be difficult to accept; however, upon reflection, I came near to agreeing with it. Although many of us work on mammals, we gen erally feel more allegiance to our specialties, such as systematics, ge netics, cytogenetics, ecology, behavior, pest control, paleontology, wildlife management, primatology, and marine mammalogy, than we do to the general field of mammalogy. However, rather than becoming discour aged from pursuing this project, I became more certain than ever that a series such as Current Mammalogy was needed. We hope to make this series a place where specialists can present their ideas not only to other members of their specialty, but to those outside the area as well. Hopefully, this exchange of ideas will be a mutually beneficial exercise. The Editorial Board of Current Mammalogy has decided to keep the range of subjects in each volume as broad as possible rather than concentrating on one or two topics, in the hope that this will keep the series as useful as possible to the broadest range of readers.

Rat

'Evolutionary Trends in the Enamel of Rodent Incisors', in W. P. Luckett and J. L. Hardenberger, eds, Evolutionary Relationships among Rodents: A Multidisciplinary Analysis (London, 1985), p. 405. 10 Thomas Martin, 'Early Rodent Incisor ...

Rat

The rat has been described as the shadow of the human: from ancient times through today, it has followed man via routes of commerce and conquest to eventually inhabit nearly every part of the world. Rats have a bad reputation—they spread disease, destroy agricultural produce, and thrive in the darkest corners of human habitation—but they have recently found credibility as a major resource for scientific experimentation. Jonathan Burt here traces the fortunes of the rat in history, myth, and culture. Central to Rat is the history of the relationship between humans and rats and, in particular, the complex human attitudes toward these shrewd creatures. Burt examines why the rat is viewed as more loathsome and verminous than other parasitic animals and considers why humans have had diametrically opposed attitudes about the rat: some cultures greatly admire the rat for its skills, while others consider the rat the scourge of the earth. Burt also draws on a wide range of examples to explore the rat's role in science, culture, and art, from its appearances in children's literature such as The Wind in the Willows to Victorian rat- and dog-baiting pits to its symbolic roles in folklore. Rat offers an intriguing and richly illustrated study of one of nature's most remarkable creatures and ultimately finds that the rat exists as a perverse totem for the worst excesses of human behavior.

Tooth Enamel Microstructure

Possible phylogenetic relationships of Asiatic eurymylids and rodents, with comments on mimontonids. In LUCKETT , W.P. & HARTENBERGER , J.L. (eds), Evolutionary Relationships among Rodents, pp. 35–58. New York: Plenum Press.

Tooth Enamel Microstructure

Enamel, the shiny material covering the teeth of vertebrates is the hardest tissue the vertebrate body can produce and one of the most impressive products of biomineralization. This hard tissue is closely related to feeding, the first part in the energy intake process so basic to vertebrate life. Enamel has a complex internal microstructure full of phylogenetic and biomechanic information. Topics covered: Ontogeny; Crystallite level; Prism level; Enamel type level; Schmelzmuster level; Dentition level; Evolution; Biomechanical level; Glossary.

The Beginning of the Age of Mammals

Comparative Biology and Evolutionary Relationships of Tree Shrews . Plenum Press , New York . 1985. Superordinal and intraordinal affinities of rodents : Developmental evidence from the dentition and placenta- tion ; pp .

The Beginning of the Age of Mammals

Publisher description

Primates and Their Relatives in Phylogenetic Perspective

The pattern of mammalian evolution and the relative rate of molecular evolution. Genetics 124:165–173. Fong, S.-L., Fong, ... Evolutionary Relationships among Rodents: A Multidisciplinary Analysis, pp. 453–474. Plenum Press, New York.

Primates and Their Relatives in Phylogenetic Perspective

This unique volume investigates the relationships of primates at the ordinal and higher classificatory levels from a variety of interdisciplinary viewpoints. Individual chapters examine the origin and evolution of gliding in early Cenozoic Dermoptera, the ontogeny of the tympanic floor in Archontans, the role of the neurosciences in primate evolutionary biology, and many other subjects. The work will be of particular interest to primatologists, zoologists, and systematists.

Capybara

Sahni A (1985) Enamel structure of early mammals and its role in evaluating relationships among rodents. In: Luckett WP, Hartenberger JL (eds) Evolutionary relationships among rodents: a multidisciplinary analysis.

Capybara

The capybara is the neotropical mammal with the highest potential for production and domestication. Amongst the favorable characteristics for domestication we can list its high prolificacy, rapid growth rate, a herbivorous diet, social behavior and relative tameness. The genus (with only two species) is found from the Panama Canal to the north of Argentina on the east of the Andes. Chile is the only country in South America where the capybara is not found. The species is eaten all over its range, especially by poor, rural and traditional communities engaged in subsistence hunting. On the other hand, in large urban settlements wildlife is consumed by city dwellers as a delicacy. The sustainable management of capybara in the wild has been adopted by some South American countries, while others have encouraged capybara rearing in captivity.

Tangled Trees

Additional studies of the phylogenetic relationships within the hosts or the parasites are now needed for a better resolution of the ... Amino acid sequence data and evolutionary relationships among Hystricognaths and other rodents.

Tangled Trees

In recent years, the use of molecular data to build phylogenetic trees and sophisticated computer-aided techniques to analyze them have led to a revolution in the study of cospeciation. Tangled Trees provides an up-to-date review and synthesis of current knowledge about phylogeny, cospeciation, and coevolution. The opening chapters present various methodological and theoretical approaches, ranging from the well-known parsimony approach to "jungles" and Bayesian statistical models. Then a series of empirical chapters discusses detailed studies of cospeciation involving vertebrate hosts and their parasites, including nematodes, viruses, and lice. Tangled Trees will be welcomed by researchers in a wide variety of fields, from parasitology and ecology to systematics and evolutionary biology. Contributors: Sarah Al-Tamimi, Michael A. Charleston, Dale H. Clayton, James W. Demastes, Russell D. Gray, Mark S. Hafner, John P. Huelsenbeck, J.-P. Hugot, Kevin P. Johnson, Peter Kabat, Bret Larget, Joanne Martin, Yannis Michalakis, Roderic D. M. Page, Ricardo L. Palma, Adrian M. Paterson, Susan L. Perkins, Andy Purvis, Bruce Rannala, David L. Reed, Fredrik Ronquist, Theresa A. Spradling, Jason Taylor, Michael Tristem

Mammals of Africa Volume III

The gastric morphology of the white-tailed rat Mystromys albicaudatus (A. Smith 1834) and preliminary ... Phylogenetic relationships and mitochondrial DNA sequences evolution in the African rodent subfamily Otomyinae (Muridae).

Mammals of Africa  Volume III

Mammals of Africa (MoA) is a series of six volumes which describes, in detail, every currently recognized species of African land mammal. This is the first time that such extensive coverage has ever been attempted, and the volumes incorporate the very latest information and detailed discussion of the morphology, distribution, biology and evolution (including reference to fossil and molecular data) of Africa's mammals. With more than 1,160 species and 16-18 orders, Africa has the greatest diversity and abundance of mammals in the world. The reasons for this and the mechanisms behind their evolution are given special attention in the series. Each volume follows the same format, with detailed profiles of every species and higher taxa. The series includes hundreds of colour illustrations and pencil drawings by Jonathan Kingdon highlighting the morphology and behaviour of the species concerned, as well as line drawings of skulls and jaws by Jonathan Kingdon and Meredith Happold. Every species also includes a detailed distribution map. Edited by Jonathan Kingdon, David Happold, Tom Butynski, Mike Hoffmann, Meredith Happold and Jan Kalina, and written by more than 350 authors, all experts in their fields, Mammals of Africa is as comprehensive a compendium of current knowledge as is possible. Extensive references alert readers to more detailed information. Volume III, edited by David Happold, has profiles of 395 species of rodents, comprising the squirrels, dormice, jerboas, blind mole-rats, African root-rats, pouched rats and mice, Swamp Mouse, climbing mice, fat mice, White-tailed Rat, rock mice, voles, Maned Rat, spiny mice, brush-furred mice, gerbils, jirds, taterils, African Forest Mouse, rats and mice, vlei rats, whistling rats, anomalures, springhares, gundis, African mole-rats, porcupines, Noki (Dassie Rat), cane rats and Coypu. The volume concludes with 13 species of hares and rabbits.

Systematics and Evolutionary Relationships of Spiny Pocket Mice Genus Liomys

A selection of lectotypes of American rodents in the collection of the British Museum . Ann . Mag . Nat . Hist . , ser . 9 , 19 : 545-554 . TIPTON , V. J. , R. M. ALTMAN , AND C. M. KEENAN . 1966 . Mites of the subfamily Laelaptinae in ...

Systematics and Evolutionary Relationships of Spiny Pocket Mice  Genus Liomys


Paleogene Mammals

Li, C. and Ting, S., 1985, Possible phylogenetic relationship of Asiatic eurymylids and rodents, with comments on mimotonids; in Luckett, W. P. and Hartenberger, J.-L., eds., Evolutionary relationships among rodents: A multidisciplinary ...

Paleogene Mammals