The Experience Of Nothingness Sri Nisargadatta Maharaja S Talks On Realizing The Infinite

In this volume, Nisargadatta clearly demonstrates that logic and spirituality do not necessarily stand in opposition to one another.

The Experience Of Nothingness Sri Nisargadatta Maharaja S Talks On Realizing The Infinite

Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj (1897-1981), a revered master of the Tantric Nath lineage, is an inspiring example of an ordinary family man who attained complete realization of the Infinite. His words carry a rare potency that can jolt the listener or reader into a profound sense of awareness, which at the same time signifies true freedom-the freedom from all fear and mental suffering. In this volume, Nisargadatta clearly demonstrates that logic and spirituality do not necessarily stand in opposition to one another. In a chapter after which this book has been titled, Nisargadatta relentlessly pursues a logical argument with the visitor to its very end.

The Experience of Nothingness

In The Experience of Nothingness, Michael Novak has two objectives. First, he shows the paths by which the experience of nothingness is becoming common among all those who live in free societies.

The Experience of Nothingness

In The Experience of Nothingness, Michael Novak has two objectives. First, he shows the paths by which the experience of nothingness is becoming common among all those who live in free societies. Second, he details the various experiences that lead to the nothingness point of view. Most discussions of these matters have been so implicated in the European experience that the term nihilism has a European ring. Novak, however, articulates this experience of formlessness in an American context.In his new introduction, the author lists four requirements that must be met by an individual in order for the experience of nothingness to emerge: a commitment to honesty, a commitment to courage, recognition of how widespread the experience of nothingness is, and a virtue of will. Novak writes that these principles are what guide self-described philosophical nihilists. But many people simply borrow the nihilistic conclusions without observing the moral commitments to them. For this reason Novak believes that nihilism is fraudulent as a theory intended to explain the experience of nothingness. Nihilism in practice, he maintains, often results in a form of intolerance. The Experience of Nothingness is a work that will cause many scholars to rethink their beliefs. It should be read by philosophers, theologians, sociologists, political theorists, and cultural historians.

The Experience of Emptiness

" Mary-Anne Elwood "The story takes you places you don't want to leave as you are caught up in the adventure and mishaps of this banished man. You won't want to set the novel down to leave this man alone for a minute.

The Experience of Emptiness

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I Am that

I Am that


Nothingness and the Meaning of Life

“speaks” to man of Being in a way that verbal speech cannot, as for example in
the experience of nothingness'.19 This pre-ontic experience can be identified
with the idea of 'ontological truth' that Käufer finds in the early Heidegger. As we
saw ...

Nothingness and the Meaning of Life

What is the meaning of life? Does anything really matter? In the past few decades these questions, perennially associated with philosophy in the popular consciousness, have rightly retaken their place as central topics in the academy. In this major contribution, Nicholas Waghorn provides a sustained and rigorous elucidation of what it would take for lives to have significance. Bracketing issues about ways our lives could have more or less meaning, the focus is rather on the idea of ultimate meaning, the issue of whether a life can attain meaning that cannot be called into question. Waghorn sheds light on this most fundamental of existential problems through a detailed yet comprehensive examination of the notion of nothing, embracing classic and cutting-edge literature from both the analytic and Continental traditions. Central figures such as Heidegger, Carnap, Wittgenstein, Nozick and Nagel are drawn upon to anchor the discussion in some of the most influential discussion of recent philosophical history. In the process of relating our ideas concerning nothing to the problem of life's meaning, Waghorn's book touches upon a number of fundamental themes, including reflexivity and its relation to our conceptual limits, whether religion has any role to play in the question of life's meaning, and the nature and constraints of philosophical methodology. A number of major philosophical traditions are addressed, including phenomenology, poststructuralism, and classical and paraconsistent logics. In addition to providing the most thorough current discussion of ultimate meaning, it will serve to introduce readers to philosophical debates concerning the notion of nothing, and the appendix engaging religion will be of value to both philosophers and theologians.

A Psychology of Nothingness

For everyone who thinks that alienation is a symptom of illness, an experience to avoid, or a sign of personal failure, this book is happy--and mandatory--reading.--Adapted from dust jacket.

A Psychology of Nothingness

Is there a way to understand--and, more important, to make use of--the experiences and emotions that we usually think of as being entirely negative? How are we to make sense of life's apparent "non-sense": the loneliness, depression, anxiety, frustration, anger, apathy, and anguish that we are certain to encounter in the course of living? William F. Kraft, a practicing psychotherapist, maintains that we can use all of these experiences in the service of life and fulfillment--once we understand that they are part of the process of growth. It is only when people admit to pain and loneliness, he says, that they can begin to lead meaningful lives. The feelings of nothingness are essential for authentic living--inescapable and even necessary. Dr. Kraft discusses the experience of nothingness--as a fundamental life force and as creative suffering. Then he analyzes the language of nothingness: all the sad words for the bad emotions we meet. He explores the dynamics and meaning of "healthy" and "unhealthy," as applied to our feelings. Proposing that man discovers himself in his sense of nothingness at various stages of his life, Dr. Kraft explores the first emergence into a consciousness of nothingness, in adolescence, as a sense of boredom and cynicism. Next, he deals with the depression, loneliness, and frustration of early adulthood. In full adulthood, maintains the author, the sense of nothingness is banished by commitment and a search for authentic living. Then in middle and old age, he suggests, a positive approach must be forged for experiences of depression, guilt, anguish, and death. In his final chapters Dr. Kraft offers a new psychological approach to death and dying, which are the clearest articulations we know of nothingness. For everyone who thinks that alienation is a symptom of illness, an experience to avoid, or a sign of personal failure, this book is happy--and mandatory--reading.--Adapted from dust jacket.

The Bridge to Nothingness

In this work, Shoham deals with ideas that are common to Gnosticism, Kabala, and existentialism, irrespective of their historical interrelationships.

The Bridge to Nothingness

"In The Bridge to Nothingness, author Shlomo Giora Shoham explicates myth as a projection of human experience. Human development dynamics, according to Shoham, are represented by myths and reflected in religious creeds. Myths constitute projective evidence of the development of psychic processes at early orality; they at once reveal and conceal their psychological content. In this work, Shoham deals with ideas that are common to Gnosticism, Kabala, and existentialism, irrespective of their historical interrelationships. He compares the Heideggerian notion of the thrownness of the individual into the world with the Gnostic teaching of the divine descent and incarnation, the incarceration of the divine in objects and life forms. All three ideologies speak of God as the spiritual core of human being. Union with God is unachievable, but one can achieve symbiosis with God and humanness through creativity and revelation." "The author's integration of psychology and mythic symbolism is stimulating: The Bridge to Nothingness is filled with deep psychological and spiritual insights. His portrayal of kabalistic thought is perceptive and erudite. He makes use of the latest scholarship, and more importantly, what he says will contribute to the field and provoke discussion and debate. His sensitivity to the dynamics of mystical experience enables him to see clearly its positive dimension." "Very little has been written on the interface between Gnosticism, Kabala, and psychology. Shoham's work is original, provocative, and insightful; The Bridge to Nothingness will break new ground in these studies, and enrich the understanding of psychological and religious symbolism."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

From Phenomenology to Thought Errancy and Desire

In Heidegger's dialectic, anxiety, the most negative experience, experience of
nothingness itself, converts into the most positive experience, positing my
existence as my own, positing the world in its totality. The entry into the world as
my home ...

From Phenomenology to Thought  Errancy  and Desire

For both continental and analytic styles of philosophy, the thought of Martin Heidegger must be counted as one of the most important influences in contemporary philosophy. In this book, essays by internationally noted scholars, ranging from David B. Allison to Slavoj Zizek, honour the interpretive contributions of William J. Richardson's pathbreaking Heidegger: Through Phenomenology to Thought. The essays move from traditional phenomenology to the idea of essential (another) thinking, the questions of translation and existential expressions of the turn of Heidegger's thought, the intersection of politics and language, the philosophic significance of Jacques Lacan, and several essays on science and technology. All show the influence of Richardson's first study. A valuable emphasis appears in Richardson's interpretation of Heidegger's conception of die Irre, interpreted as Errancy, set in its current locus in a discussion of Heidegger's debacle with the political in his involvement with National Socialism.

Philosophers of Nothingness

In any case, at least as far as the notion of pure experience, which has come to
be recognized as the central notion of the book, we need to be a little more
sanguine. Actually, the idea of pure experience is only mentioned in the opening
and ...

Philosophers of Nothingness

The past twenty years have seen the publication of numerous translations and commentaries on the principal philosophers of the Kyoto School, but so far no general overview and evaluation of their thought has been available, either in Japanese or in Western languages. James Heisig, a longstanding participant in these efforts, has filled that gap with Philosophers of Nothingness. In this extensive study, the ideas of Nishida Kitaro, Tanabe Hajime, and Nishitani Keiji are presented both as a consistent school of thought in its own right and as a challenge to the Western philosophical tradition to open itself to the original contribution of Japan.

The Other Side of Nothingness

Suddenly you break through the barrier; you will astonish heaven and shake the
earth.9 On the other side of the experience of nothingness, a new vantage point
emerges as one discovers that samsara and nirvana are not dualistic states of ...

The Other Side of Nothingness

Provides an innovative theology based in mysticism, one that acknowledges the pain of spiritual repression and values religious pluralism.

The Seed of Nothingness

This book breaks the realms of the mind, and goes a step further making a clear connection with a person's heart, and the mind by answering not only the question itself, but also making one face the source from where the question initially ...

The Seed of Nothingness

Every individual tends to stumble upon the blockages of their mind when it comes to finding their purpose of life. The mind intervenes and creates an illusion of thoughts and security around certain belief structures and conditionings. This book breaks the realms of the mind, and goes a step further making a clear connection with a person's heart, and the mind by answering not only the question itself, but also making one face the source from where the question initially arose. Once the mind and heart are at peace the world surrounding a person shows the true nature that indeed is paradise. All questions will disappear thus leading an individual to experience life as it is. Many books have been written on the subject, but they tend to be a good read but miss the potential to actually make an individual realize that life was not intended to follow behind the footsteps of others, neither does life resides in leading a group. Books on spirituality achieve a type of entertainment for the mind and numb it but the key is missing in making the connective bridge between the heart and the mind. In today's world each and every individual needs to find the inner connection in self and start a new generation of self-evolved beings for the stage that the world resides in today. The very foundation of life is shaken by the ideas of the mind. Most books propose to forget the mind, and be silent to just meditate thoughts away, shutting the mind down. This book paves a path from the mind to the heart, and creates a deeper understanding that one cannot just shut the mind out, but one can live in harmony by connecting the heart with the mind. This book is written in easy language making it easily readable without big words and terms for individuals to get lost in. It is more of a conversation within the mind and the heart thus opening new realizations towards life.

Religion and Nothingness

Religion and Nothingness represents the major work of one of Japan's most powerful and committed philosophical minds.

Religion and Nothingness

In Religion and Nothingness the leading representative of the Kyoto School of Philosophy lays the foundation of thought for a world in the making, for a world united beyond the differences of East and West. Keiji Nishitani notes the irreversible trend of Western civilization to nihilism, and singles out the conquest of nihilism as the task for contemporary philosophy. Nihility, or relative nothingness, can only be overcome by being radicalized to Emptiness, or absolute nothingness. Taking absolute nothingness as the fundamental notion in rational explanations of the Eastern experience of human life, Professor Nishitani examines the relevance of this notion for contemporary life, and in particular for Western philosophical theories and religious believes. Everywhere his basic intention remains the same: to direct our modern predicament to a resolution through this insight. The challenge that the thought of Keiji Nishitani presents to the West, as a modern version of an Eastern speculative tradition that is every bit as old and as variegated as our own, is one that brings into unity the principle of reality and the principle of salvation. In the process, one traditional Western idea after another comes under scrutiny: the dichotomy of faith and reason, of being and substance, the personal and transcendent notions of God, the exaggerated role given to the knowing ego, and even the Judeo-Christian view of history itself. Religion and Nothingness represents the major work of one of Japan's most powerful and committed philosophical minds.

Earth and Gods

144 The beforehand experience of nothingness in dread enables Dasein to
encounter beings, to reveal them, and to help them to be beings. For knowledge
of that which is, the knowledge of nothingness is presupposed. Since Dasein is ...

Earth and Gods

Earth and Gods is an attempt to introduce the reader to Heidegger's fully developed philosophy. The title Earth and Gods gives an im pression of not being a general study of Heidegger's philosophy. However, this is not true - the earth and the gods are fundamental ontological symbols of his fully developed philosophy, namely, his third and final phase of thought. This phase repeats the problems of both preceding phases in a fuller and more developed manner; hence, it implies them. The two preceding phases are the phase of Dasein and the phase of Being. These two phases are a natural flow of fundamental problems which reach their final formation and development in the phase of earth and gods. Dasein (the first phase) leads to Being, and Being (the second phase) bursts into fundamental ontological powers of Being (Seinsmiichte) which are earth and sky, gods and mortals (the third phase). Since earth is unthinkable without sky and since gods are gods in the world of mortals - of men, the title Earth and Gods is an abbreviation of these four fundamental powers of Being. Hence, an investigation of earth and gods is an attempt to present Heidegger's philosophy as a whole. Such a presentation provides the reader with the background necessary for a more adequate and efficient understanding of the writings of Heidegger himself. Thus, Earth and Gods may rightly be considered an introduction to Hei degger's philosophy.

The Problem of Freedom and Necessity in Human Action

There must be the experience of the presence of objects in order to experience
the absence of objects . This brings the discsussion into anotber important .
aspect of Nothingness . There is the experience of Nothingness in the world
because ...

The Problem of Freedom and Necessity in Human Action


Nothingness in Asian Philosophy

A variety of ideas about nothingness gained profound philosophical prominence
in a number of South and East Asian ... how we experience loss in our temporal
and very ephemeral existence, how death is taken to be a form of nothingness, ...

Nothingness in Asian Philosophy

A variety of crucial and still most relevant ideas about nothingness or emptiness have gained profound philosophical prominence in the history and development of a number of South and East Asian traditions—including in Buddhism, Daoism, Neo-Confucianism, Hinduism, Korean philosophy, and the Japanese Kyoto School. These traditions share the insight that in order to explain both the great mysteries and mundane facts about our experience, ideas of "nothingness" must play a primary role. This collection of essays brings together the work of twenty of the world’s prominent scholars of Hindu, Buddhist, Daoist, Neo-Confucian, Japanese and Korean thought to illuminate fascinating philosophical conceptualizations of "nothingness" in both classical and modern Asian traditions. The unique collection offers new work from accomplished scholars and provides a coherent, panoramic view of the most significant ways that "nothingness" plays crucial roles in Asian philosophy. It includes both traditional and contemporary formulations, sometimes putting Asian traditions into dialogue with one another and sometimes with classical and modern Western thought. The result is a book of immense value for students and researchers in Asian and comparative philosophy.

Work Death and Life Itself

The Experience of Nothingness The experience of hopelessness and despair
which result from such cases may be within ... But rationalizations and shut-
downs are, from abroaderperspective of human life, only very crucial experiences
 ...

Work  Death  and Life Itself

This unusual and thought-provoking work questions current mainstream approaches to organizational psychology. Grounded in organizational symbolism the author depicts the potential meaning of work in the broader context of life and death. Thus Siever's book is a fundamental critique of motivation, participation and leadership research. With human mortality in mind, organization and management appear in a different light: motivation as a surrogate for meaning, participation and management as a quarrel about immortality, and leadership as a perpetuation of immaturity. Sievers advocates a "management of wisdom".

Mystic Experience The

... instantaneous decision: I could enter the light into which I would merge and be
gone or stop and end the experience. ... At first I was but aware of a blissful
nothingness; that is, the first awareness was simply of being aware while awash
1 1.

Mystic Experience  The

Explores the human experience of mysticism and looks at it within the spiritual traditions around the world.

The Existentialist s Guide to Death the Universe and Nothingness

Basic distinctions, divisions and differences arise that always involve
nothingness or negation – here is not there, this is not ... arguing that we do not
actually experience time and space, but rather that we experience in terms of
time and space.

The Existentialist s Guide to Death  the Universe and Nothingness

The Existentialist's Guide to Death, the Universe and Nothingness is an entertaining philosophical guide to life, love, hate, freedom, sex, anxiety, God and death; a guide to everything and nothing. Gary Cox, bestselling author of How to Be an Existentialist and How to Be a Philosopher, takes us on an exciting journey through the central themes of existentialism, a philosophy of the human condition. The Existentialist's Guide fascinates, informs, provokes and inspires as it explores existentialism's uncompromising view of human reality. It leaves the reader with no illusions about how hard it is to live honestly and achieve authenticity. It has, however, a redeeming humour that sets the wisdom of the great existentialist philosophers alongside the wit of great musicians and comedians. A realistic self-help book for anyone interested in personal empowerment, The Existentialist's Guide offers a wealth of profound philosophical insight into life, the universe and everything.

Mystical Moments and Unitive Thinking

Experiences of mystical nothingness have also been produced experimentally
through hetero-hypnotic work with very deep trance states. Unity may be
experienced on the way to nothingness. Just before the climactic experience of
nothing, ...

Mystical Moments and Unitive Thinking

Merkur proposes an alternative to the traditional psychoanalytic explanation of mystical experiences as regression to the solipsism of earliest infancy. He does this by viewing unitive thinking as a line of cognitive development, and mystical moments as creative inspirations on unitive topics. Utilizing classical self-reports by Christian, Jewish, and Muslim mystics, Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras, and modern Western peak experiences, Merkur argues that experiences of mystical union are manifestations of a broader category of psychological processes that manifest in scientific and moral thought, as well as in mysticism. Unconscious as well as conscious, unitive thinking is sometimes realistic and sometimes fantastic, in patterns that are consistent with cognitive development in general. Mystical moments of unitive thinking may be considered moments of creative inspiration that happen to make use of unitive ideas. Building on the psychoanalytic object-relations theory that the self is always in relationship with an object, Merkur argues that the solipsism of some varieties of mystical union always implies unconscious ideas of a love object who is transcendent.