Exploring Oral History

This valuable guide can be used as a supplement in a wide range of academic disciplines, including history, anthropology, sociology, folklore, communications, and social psychology.

Exploring Oral History

Written with clarity and without pretension, Exploring Oral History is a user-friendly guide to the systematic, interactive collection and analysis of peoples accounts of their lives and experiences. It is designed to help the reader understand the value of oral history as a method of social research that serves both basic academic and applied needs. Angrosino, who believes that one learns best by doing, excites interest in this research method by illustrating the how tos with his own fieldwork experiences and by describing sample projects so readers can immediately implement the guidelines he presents. Moreover, the text includes a listing of sources that can help readers explore the theory, method, and substantive data of oral history in greater detail. This valuable guide can be used as a supplement in a wide range of academic disciplines, including history, anthropology, sociology, folklore, communications, and social psychology.

Oral History Education and Justice

This book addresses oral history as a form of education for redress and reconciliation.

Oral History  Education  and Justice

This book addresses oral history as a form of education for redress and reconciliation. It provides scholarship that troubles both the possibilities and limitations of oral history in relation to the pedagogical and curricular redress of historical harms. Contributing authors compel the reader to question what oral history calls them to do, as citizens, activists, teachers, or historians, in moving towards just relations. Highlighting the link between justice and public education through oral history, chapters explore how oral histories question pedagogical and curricular harms, and how they shed light on what is excluded or made invisible in public education. The authors speak to oral history as a hopeful and important pedagogy for addressing difficult knowledge, exploring significant questions such as: how do community-based oral history projects affect historical memory of the public? What do we learn from oral history in government systems of justice versus in the political struggles of non-governmental organizations? What is the burden of collective remembering and how does oral history implicate people in the past? How are oral histories about difficult knowledge represented in curriculum, from digital storytelling and literature to environmental and treaty education? This book presents oral history as as a form of education that can facilitate redress and reconciliation in the face of challenges, and bring about an awareness of historical knowledge to support action that addresses legacies of harm. Furthering the field on oral history and education, this work will appeal to academics, researchers and postgraduate students in the fields of social justice education, oral history, Indigenous education, curriculum studies, history of education, and social studies education.

The Oral History Reader

38 SOUND, MEMORY AND DIS/PLACEMENT: EXPLORING SOUND, SONG AND PERFORMANCE AS ORAL HISTORY IN THE SOUTHERN AFRICAN BORDERLANDS

The Oral History Reader

The Oral History Reader, now in its third edition, is a comprehensive, international anthology combining major, 'classic' articles with cutting-edge pieces on the theory, method and use of oral history. Twenty-seven new chapters introduce the most significant developments in oral history in the last decade to bring this invaluable text up to date, with new pieces on emotions and the senses, on crisis oral history, current thinking around traumatic memory, the impact of digital mobile technologies, and how oral history is being used in public contexts, with more international examples to draw in work from North and South America, Britain and Europe, Australasia, Asia and Africa. Arranged in five thematic sections, each with an introduction by the editors to contextualise the selection and review relevant literature, articles in this collection draw upon diverse oral history experiences to examine issues including: Key debates in the development of oral history over the past seventy years First hand reflections on interview practice, and issues posed by the interview relationship The nature of memory and its significance in oral history The practical and ethical issues surrounding the interpretation, presentation and public use of oral testimonies how oral history projects contribute to the study of the past and involve the wider community. The challenges and contributions of oral history projects committed to advocacy and empowerment With a revised and updated bibliography and useful contacts list, as well as a dedicated online resources page, this third edition of The Oral History Reader is the perfect tool for those encountering oral history for the first time, as well as for seasoned practitioners.

Oral History Education and Justice

This book addresses oral history as a form of education for redress and reconciliation.

Oral History  Education  and Justice

This book addresses oral history as a form of education for redress and reconciliation. It provides scholarship that troubles both the possibilities and limitations of oral history in relation to the pedagogical and curricular redress of historical harms. Contributing authors compel the reader to question what oral history calls them to do, as citizens, activists, teachers, or historians, in moving towards just relations. Highlighting the link between justice and public education through oral history, chapters explore how oral histories question pedagogical and curricular harms, and how they shed light on what is excluded or made invisible in public education. The authors speak to oral history as a hopeful and important pedagogy for addressing difficult knowledge, exploring significant questions such as: how do community-based oral history projects affect historical memory of the public? What do we learn from oral history in government systems of justice versus in the political struggles of non-governmental organizations? What is the burden of collective remembering and how does oral history implicate people in the past? How are oral histories about difficult knowledge represented in curriculum, from digital storytelling and literature to environmental and treaty education? This book presents oral history as as a form of education that can facilitate redress and reconciliation in the face of challenges, and bring about an awareness of historical knowledge to support action that addresses legacies of harm. Furthering the field on oral history and education, this work will appeal to academics, researchers and postgraduate students in the fields of social justice education, oral history, Indigenous education, curriculum studies, history of education, and social studies education.

Women s Words

Women's Words is the first collection of writings devoted exclusively to exploring the theoretical, methodological, and practical problems that arise when women utilize oral history as a tool of feminist scholarship.

Women s Words

Women's Words is the first collection of writings devoted exclusively to exploring the theoretical, methodological, and practical problems that arise when women utilize oral history as a tool of feminist scholarship. In thirteen multi-disciplin ary esays, the book takes stock of the implicit presuppositions , contradictions, and prospects of oral h

Oral History and Digital Humanities

Exploring the developments that have occurred in the practice of oral history since digital audio and video became viable, this book explores various groundbreaking projects in the history of digital oral history, distilling the insights of ...

Oral History and Digital Humanities

Exploring the developments that have occurred in the practice of oral history since digital audio and video became viable, this book explores various groundbreaking projects in the history of digital oral history, distilling the insights of pioneers in the field and applying them to the constantly changing electronic landscape of today.

Oral History

... history and Mass - Observation writings ; explore the theoretical and
methodological problems posed by oral history practice ; • take an option from
history , social science , gender studies or literature courses ; • work on their own
research ...

Oral History


Women s Oral History

The collection provides both "how to" interview guides and examples of current research in sections covering basic methodology and rationale; the myriad uses of women's oral history; and discoveries and insights gained from oral history ...

Women s Oral History

Women's Oral History: The "Frontiers" Reader is an essential guide to the practice of gathering and interpreting women's oral accounts of their lives. During the 1970s, whenøwomen's history was just developing, the lack of historical information about women's lives was glaring. Oral history quickly emerged as a vital and necessary tool for documenting the lives and experiences of women, who rarely recorded it for themselves?much less for posterity. Standard models of practicing oral history, however, were inadequate to the job of organizing and interpreting women's lives, and new models that addressed the distinctiveness of the lives of women?in all of their diversity?were needed. As one of the earliest journals devoted to feminist scholarship in the United States, Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies was in the vanguard of the emerging field of women's oral history when it published its first landmark issue on the subject in 1977. Three subsequent issues exploring the evolving field has secured Frontiers' reputation at the forefront of women's oral history. Women's Oral History includes nineteen essays, each addressing the particularity of women's lives and experience. The collection provides both "how to" interview guides and examples of current research in sections covering basic methodology and rationale; the myriad uses of women's oral history; and discoveries and insights gained from oral history applications. The essays raise thought-provoking questions, glean original insights about the lives of women and the practice of history, and call for women to write and record their own histories.

Oral History

In this book, the author uses autobiographies and oral histories to explore how
both black children and white children learned about race and were socialized
into their respective races during the time of Jim Crow. Rosenwald, G. C. &
Ochberg ...

Oral History

Part of the Understanding Statistics/Understanding Qualitative Researcch series, Oral History serves as a guide to properly recording oral histories. This volume also addresses the challenges of evaluating this material.

The Mezuzah in the Madonna s Foot

Recounts how Jews fleeing the Holocaust found unexpected sanctuary in fascist Spain

The Mezuzah in the Madonna s Foot

Recounts how Jews fleeing the Holocaust found unexpected sanctuary in fascist Spain

Exploring History in the School

A description of a local history course developed for year 6 students at Fairfield North Primary School in 1983.

Exploring History in the School

A description of a local history course developed for year 6 students at Fairfield North Primary School in 1983.

Oral History Association Newsletter

Just in the introductions , Enid Douglas talked about the founding of the Oral
History Association , Art Hansen recalled that a student nudged him into
exploring oral history , Valerie Matsumoto discovered oral history in an early
women's ...

Oral History Association Newsletter


Performing Race Performing History

The text argues that race is central to investigating the history of sundown towns and uses performance as an analytical tool to understand racial dimensions in community members' stories.

Performing Race  Performing History

Sundown towns are predominantly White communities with a history of excluding African Americans. Although sundown towns have inevitably changed over time, a number of them continue to be alarmingly White, and their reputations continue to persist. Sundown towns are widespread across the U.S. and despite their prevalence, very little research exists on the topic. Furthermore, sundown towns were largely maintained through oral tradition. In this dissertation, oral history interviews with community residents explore the history of sundown towns in southern Illinois. The text argues that race is central to investigating the history of sundown towns and uses performance as an analytical tool to understand racial dimensions in community members' stories. The author examines how everyday community narratives reveal racialized performances and construct current manifestations of sundown towns. Further examined is the process of translating these narratives into a staged performance. Ultimately, it is found that exploring everyday community narratives from the field to the stage allows a heuristic view of the living history of sundown towns.

Power to Explore

St COmYibUIIOn l0 module into the Hubble Space Telescope mock-up selence~
embOdylng its in MSF C 's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator, June 1992. dream of
forging instruments for exploring the heavens. NASM Oral History Project; ...

Power to Explore

This scholarly study of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center places the institution in social, political, scientific, and technological context. It traces the evolution of Marshall, located in Huntsville, Alabama, from its origins as an Army missile development organization to its status in 1990 as one of the most diversified of NASA's field Centers. Chapters discuss military rocketry programs in Germany and the United States, Apollo-Saturn, Skylab, Space Shuttle, Spacelab, the Space Station and various scientific and technical projects including the Hubble Space Telescope. It sheds light not only on the history of space technology, science, and exploration, but also on the Cold War, federal politics, and complex organizations.

Oral History

This guide seeks to address some of this by suggesting how modern approaches to oral history, that are complex and challenging, could be used to contribute towards the broader aim of teaching history." -- Provided by publisher.

Oral History


The Land Speaks

These essays suggest that oral history can serve both documentary and problem-solving functions as we grapple with these challenges.

The Land Speaks

The Land Speaks explores the intersection of two vibrant fields, oral history and environmental studies. Ranging across farm and forest, city and wilderness, river and desert, this collection of fourteen oral histories gives voice to nature and the stories it has to tell. These essays consider topics as diverse as environmental activism, wilderness management, public health, urban exploring, and smoke jumping. They raise questions about the roles of water, neglected urban spaces, land ownership concepts, protectionist activism, and climate change. Covering almost every region of the United States and part of the Caribbean, Lee and Newfont and their diverse collection of contributors address the particular contributions oral history can make toward understanding issues of public land and the environment. In the face of global warming and events like the Flint water crisis, environmental challenges are undoubtedly among the most pressing issues of our time. These essays suggest that oral history can serve both documentary and problem-solving functions as we grapple with these challenges.

America

Exploring Oral History LORESOURCE DIRECTORY i Teaching Resources ra
Historian ' s Toolbox Activity Exploring Oral History , found in the Unit 9 folder , p .
18 , provides a further example of what oral history can reveal about public affairs
 ...

America


Listening on the Edge

This dialogue, at the heart of this collection of oral history excerpts and essays, reveals new layers of the work of the oral historian.

Listening on the Edge

From the headlines of local newspapers to the coverage of major media outlets, scenes of war, natural disaster, political revolution and ethnic repression greet readers and viewers at every turn. What we often fail to grasp, however, despite numerous treatments of events is the deep meaning and broader significance of crisis and disaster. The complexity and texture of these situations are most evident in the broader personal stories of those whom the events impact most intimately. Oral history, with its focus on listening and collaborative creation with participants, has emerged as a forceful approach to exploring the human experience of crisis. Despite the recent growth of crisis oral history fieldwork, there has been little formal discussion of the process and meaning of utilizing oral history in these environments. Oral history research takes on special dimensions when working in highly charged situations often in close proximity to traumatic events. The emergent inclination for oral historians to respond to document crisis calls for a shared conversation among scholars as to what we have learned from crisis work so far. This dialogue, at the heart of this collection of oral history excerpts and essays, reveals new layers of the work of the oral historian. From the perspective of crisis and disaster oral history, the book addresses both the ways in which we think about the craft of oral hsitory, and the manner in which we use it. The book presents excerpts from oral histories done after twelve world crises, followed by critical analyses by the interviewers. Additional analytical chapters set the interviews in the contexts of pyschoanalysis and oral history methodology.